South Korea expects positive economic growth – Lowell Sun | Instant News


The Associated Press

Latest about pandemic coronavirus. New Coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people. For some people, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, can cause more severe illness or death.

TOP HOUR

– South Korea’s top bankers expect slow but positive economic growth.

– Australia has the lowest increase in corona virus cases in three weeks.

– Japan says the country has more than 500 new cases for the first time.

– New Zealand recorded the lowest number of new corona virus cases in almost three weeks.

___

SEOUL, South Korea – South Korea’s central banker said he expects slow but positive economic growth for a country that is dependent on trade this year despite shocks worldwide caused by the corona virus.

Bank of Korea Governor Lee Ju-yeol’s assessment on Thursday came after the bank kept its policy rate at 0.75% despite calls for lower borrowing costs. The bank’s monetary policy makers say it is necessary to wait for the effects of financial tools that have been used to spur the economy.

Lee said his forecasts for economic growth were based on expectations that the global pandemic would start slowing in the second quarter and stable in the second half of the year.

“We expect the South Korean economy to manage positive growth this year, but it will be difficult for the growth rate to reach 1%,” Lee said. “Ultimately, the flow and (economic) aspects will depend on how the COVID-19 situation develops.”

The Bank of Korea has lowered its annual growth forecast for the economy from 2.3% to 2.1% in February.

The bank last month cut emergency interest rates 0.5 to bring its policy rate to an all-time low of 0.75%. It also expands short-term loans to banks and other financial institutions through repurchase agreements to calm the coronavirus crisis-stricken market.

Some experts say it is not clear whether traditional financial tools to increase money supply will be effective now when the global pandemic has damaged supply and demand, destroyed industrial centers in China and Italy and forced millions of people to live in homes under tightened quarantine.

___

SEATTLE – About 1,000 patients at the Washington state hospital have confirmed or suspected a coronavirus diagnosis, according to new counts that showed previous surveys had lowered the admission rate.

The Seattle Times reports that the statistics of the Washington State Hospital Association, currently on April 7, include 664 confirmed and 331 other suspected cases of disease caused by coronavirus.

Cassie Sauer, associate’s executive director, said the updated amount came from a new statewide reporting system that took effect on April 2. Authorities say the new inpatient rates, although much higher than the previous number, are still roughly tracking with models showing Washington is flattening the coronavirus curve.

Governor Jay Inslee on Wednesday decided to return to the federal government field hospital that was established about a week ago at Seattle’s Century Field Event Center to help the health care system cope with what is expected to be a surge of patients.

___

SYDNEY – Australia has recorded the lowest increase in coronavirus cases in more than three weeks.

Health Minister Greg Hunt said on Thursday there were 96 new cases, the first time there were less than 100 new cases since March 17. The climax is on March 28, when 457 new cases were recorded. In total there are more than 6,000 cases and 51 deaths in Australia due to this virus.

Trying to limit its impact on the economy, lawmakers passed a wage subsidy scheme on Wednesday night worth 130 billion Australian dollars ($ 81 billion).

___

TOKYO – The Japanese Ministry of Health said Thursday that the country had more than 500 new cases for the first time on Wednesday, bringing the national total to 4,768 – excluding hundreds of cruise ships quarantined near Tokyo earlier this year.

The ascent continued two days after Prime Minister Shinzo Abe declared a state of emergency in Tokyo and six other hard-hit prefectures, while asking people to reduce at least 70% human interaction. This move allows Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike and six other prefectural leaders to issue stricter measures to maintain social distance, but without punishment for violators. So far, Koike has only issued requests to stay at home to residents. Requests for business closures and important afternoon services are still ongoing.

Many people were seen commuting to their offices Thursday morning in downtown Tokyo, because many Japanese companies were slow to allow remote workers for their employees, raising doubts about how effective measures could be taken under emergency measures.

___

WELLINGTON, New Zealand – Halfway through the planned four-week lockdown, New Zealand has recorded the lowest number of new corona virus cases in nearly three weeks.

Health officials said Thursday there were 29 new cases, the fourth consecutive daily decline since 89 new cases were recorded on Sunday.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern also announced tighter border measures that require all returning citizens to go to quarantine facilities that are managed for two weeks. Previously, citizens who returned without symptoms of COVID-19 were allowed to isolate themselves at home.

___

SEOUL, South Korea – South Korea says it has reported 39 more cases of corona virus during the past 24 hours, in a continuous slowdown of the virus outbreak in Asian countries.

The Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a statement Thursday that additional cases increased the country’s total to 10,423. It said 6,973 of them had been found and released from quarantine. The center said deaths from the corona virus rose four to 204.

But, 39 new cases are the smallest daily jump since February 20. South Korea recorded 47 and 53 new cases on Tuesday and Wednesday.

There are still concerns about a steady increase in infections related to international arrivals, which have helped increase the caseload in the densely populated metropolitan area of ​​Seoul.

As many as 22 of the 39 new cases have been reported in Seoul and surrounding areas in Gyeonggi province.

___

CARSON CITY, Nev. – The Nevada governor on Wednesday ordered the closure of golf courses, open house real estate, religious meetings of 10 or more people and additional restrictions to try to stop the spread of the corona virus.

Governor Steve Sisolak said he added restrictions because some people had created unnecessary risks by trying to avoid the rules he had made. Other restrictions are designed to reduce the amount of time people spend next to others, he said.

The governor last month ordered the closure of non-essential businesses, including gambling and casinos, and issued directives telling Nevadans to stay at home, although exceptions were made for people who went outside to exercise.

Sisolak said at a press conference late Wednesday that he ordered the closure of sports and recreational facilities where people gather, such as golf courses, tennis courts, basketball courts, and swimming pools. He said that despite his decision last month to leave the golf course open, he had seen photos sent to him about people riding on golf carts and standing together on green fields.

The governor said the new directives he signed the store bar did not have self-service foods such as salads or bulk food salads without packages, where customers would touch the same spoon and server. This also limits barber and hairdressers from offering services at home to anyone outside their immediate household.

___

BEIJING – The Chinese National Health Commission on Thursday reported 63 new COVID-19 cases, including 61 cases that were said to be imported infections in recent arrivals from abroad and two “original” cases in the southern province of Guangdong.

No new cases have been reported in Hubei, the central province hardest hit by a coronavirus outbreak. But two new deaths were reported, both in Hubei.

The capital of Wuhan province, where the virus first appeared, ended locking 76 on Wednesday. Long lines form at airports and train and bus stations as thousands of people flow out of the city to return to their homes and jobs elsewhere.

The National Health Commission also reported 56 new cases of people who tested positive for COVID-19, but showed no symptoms. In total, 77,370 people in China have recovered from illness and 3,335 people have died, according to the commission.

___

WASHINGTON – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has new guidelines for important workers because it takes a small step towards reopening the country.

This guideline applies to important workers, such as those in the health care industry and food supply, who are already within 6 feet of someone who has a confirmed or suspected case of a new corona virus.

CDC Director Robert Redfield said employees can return to work as long as they measure temperature before they go to work, wear face masks at all times and practice maintaining social distance when they are at work.

Redfield said employees must continue to stay at home if they are sick.

He also said employers in critical industries must measure the temperature of a worker before allowing them to return to work.

Redfield announced new guidelines during the daily White House briefing about US efforts to stop the spread of the virus.

New guidelines will be posted on cdc.gov.

___

WASHINGTON – Vice President Mike Pence said Philadelphia emerged as a potential hot spot for the corona virus and urged its residents to heed social distance guidelines.

Pence said he spoke with Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf, and he said Pittsburgh was also monitored for possible increases in cases.

___

WASHINGTON – US Customs and Immigration Enforcement reports an increasing number of prisoners in detention who have tested positive for the new corona virus.

ICE said there were 32 confirmed cases. 13 cases were reported on Tuesday. The biggest concentration is at the detention center in San Diego, where five detainees have tested positive. The agency said not all of those who tested positive remained in custody.

The US holds about 35,000 people in immigration detention. Immigration supporters have called for the release of immigration detainees because of the risks to those detained as well as detention staff and the health care system in the nearby community.

ICE said 11 of its employees working in detention operations had tested positive.

___

WASHINGTON – The general who heads the Army Corps of Engineers said the community was running out of time to build new medical facilities for every overflow of coronavirus patients that could not be handled by the local hospital.

Lt. Gen. Todd Semonite told reporters that he was confident the Corps would finish starting a new project in about a week. He said government leaders “must think of the worst cases and move on while they have time.”

If a city thinks they will see a peak of virus patients around April 24, and they have not yet made the decision to build more rooms, it may be too late, he said.

So far, 17 facilities, with around 15,000 beds, have been built, and 17 others have been planned by the Corps and developed by the local community and contractors. 23 other facilities are waiting, but it is unclear how many of them can actually be built.

___

PORTLAND, Ore – Governor Kate Brown said Oregon’s K-12 schools will remain closed despite the end of the academic year due to a coronavirus outbreak, placing more than 550,000 students and their teachers in the state as regions with very different resources. plan for distance learning for weeks.

Seniors who have graduation grades and are on the right track to graduate when an order stay in the state begins in mid-March will be able to graduate, Brown said.

___

PARIS – French President Emmanuel Macron has a video conference call with the leader of the World Health Organization on Wednesday.

In a conversation with Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Macron reiterated “his belief that WHO is the key to responding” to the coronavirus crisis, following criticism by US President Donald Trump.

Macron tweeted that they also discussed the evolution of the pandemic, strategies to deal with it in France and in the world, research on vaccinations and preparation of initiatives for the African continent.

At the White House on Tuesday, Trump first said the United States would “withhold” WHO funding, and then revise it by saying, “We will look to end funding.”

___

SEATTLE – Washington Governor Jay Inslee said a Defense Department field hospital that had been set up by the soccer field where the Seattle Seahawks game would be returned to the Federal Emergency Management Agency so it could be deployed to other countries facing more coronavirus crises.

Late last month Inslee announced 300 soldiers from the 627th Army Hospital in Fort Carson, Colorado, had been deployed to Seattle to become hospital staff, which was expected to produce up to 250 hospital beds for non-COVID-19 cases .

Inslee said the decision to send field hospitals to other places was made after consulting with local, state and federal leaders.

___

BELGRADE, Serbia – The Serbian president said his older son had been hospitalized after infection with a new corona virus.

President Aleksandar Vucic said on Instagram that his 22-year-old son Danilo had been treated at the Infectious Disease Clinic in Belgrade.

Vucic said “my first son had been infected with the corona virus and his clinical condition was such that he was hospitalized” at the clinic. Vucic added, “Child, you will win this.” No other details are immediately available.

Danilo Vucic was the son of the Serbian president from his first marriage. Vucic also has a daughter and another son.

___

Follow AP news coverage on the coronavirus pandemic at https://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak



image source

to request modification Contact us at Here or [email protected]

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here