Category Archives: Marshall islands

Covid 19 coronavirus: The government is expanding pre-departure tests for more travelers | Instant News


The government has officially required nearly every traveler to New Zealand to test negative for Covid-19 before boarding a plane.

The new rules will come into effect at 11:59 p.m. on Monday, January 25 – this is in an effort to minimize disruption to passengers leaving soon.

This regulation was signed last week by Covid-19 Minister Chris Hipkins. Previously, only travelers from the UK and US needed to test negative in order to come to New Zealand.

Starting January 25, it has been extended to any incoming tourists, except Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Island nations.

But not all Pacific Island countries are excluded – Papua New Guinea, which has nearly 1,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19, is not on the list.

Likewise with French Polynesia, where 17,000 cases have been confirmed and 126 people have died from Covid-19.

Hipkins also said that the Government was “exploring several possibilities” whether they could get a small amount of the Covid-19 vaccine to frontline workers earlier than previously hinted at.

“If we can do it, we will be able to do it very quickly – but it all depends on whether the vaccine company will supply it,” he told a news conference this afternoon.

He would not elaborate because it is “quite a sensitive international negotiation”.

Hipkins said the new measures would not stop Covid from entering the country, but the government’s aim was to reduce the number of cases.

He said nearly all travelers had complied with the rules so far, and airlines were “very supportive”.

“New Zealand is not alone here – many countries are now proposing this.”

Hipkins said airlines have been vigilant to ensure travelers have followed the rules before they board their flights to NZ.

Asked about New Zealand’s access to the Covid vaccine, Hipkins said “we are very close to the front of the queue”. The first deliveries will arrive in the first quarter – “that’s the earliest time we can get … that’s the reality of manufacturing”.

Starting February 8, all passengers arriving in New Zealand – except those from exempt countries – without evidence of an approved negative test or medical certificate will be subject to an offense fee or a fine of up to $ 1000.

Hipkins said that so far only one person from the US or UK has not tested negative for Covid-19.

He added that airlines are increasingly refusing to board people who fail to produce negative tests.

But he said the Government could increase the fine if there was a higher level of non-compliance.

In addition to the new pre-departure requirements, the Government has also changed the rules surrounding Covid-19 testing in New Zealand’s managed isolation and quarantine (MIQ) facilities.

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From now on, travelers arriving to New Zealand will be required to take the test on arrival – again, except for Australia, Antarctica and most Pacific Island countries.

They still have to undergo quarantine for 14 days, and undergo routine tests on the third and 12th day.

“New Zealand already has some of the strictest border protection measures in the world,” Hipkins said this morning.

“Today’s amendments further strengthen that position in line with the Government’s overall elimination strategy, and more actions can be added as needed.”

Asked about potential contact between people at MIQ facilities, such as in designated smoking areas, Hipkins said the Government has tightened social distancing measures.

Hipkins said the primary obligation was on travelers to comply with regulations – but airlines were also expected to play a role in checking whether passengers had negative test evidence.

Full list of countries and territories not included in the expanded pre-departure requirements:

• Antarctica
• Australia
• Cook Islands
• Federated States of Micronesia
• Fiji
• Kiribati
• Marshall Island
• Nauru
• New Caledonia
• Niue
• Palau
• Samoa
• Solomon Islands
• Tokelau
• Tonga
• Tuvalu
• Vanuatu
• Wallis and Futuna.

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USS Russell engaged with partners during the Oceania transit | Instant News


PACIFIC SAMUDERA – The Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Russell (DDG 59) completed its transit and presence operations in Oceania on 18 January, interacting with partners and enforcing commitments with the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia and Papua New Guinea.

Russell makes a brief stop to refuel at Majuro, RMI, January 7. After successfully completing refueling and refueling at Majuro, Russell undertook a cooperative deployment with two patrol boats of the FSM National Police Maritime Surveillance Division around Pohnpei, FSM. The ship completes its transit through Oceania, rich in fisheries, by patrolling the offshore enclave of the Compact of Free Association (COFA) state to prevent illegal, unregulated, unreported (IUU) fishing.

“USS Russell is honored to work with the state of COFA to foster our lasting partnership in the region,” said Cmdr. Ryan Rogers, commander Russell. “Our operation shows our support for these wonderful countries in a beautiful region of the world that is rich with naval history.”

The COFA agreement establishes free association relations between the United States and the three Pacific Island sovereign states of the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.

“All countries benefit from free and open access to the sea,” said Captain Steve McDowell, Commodore, Squadron of Twenty-Three Destroyers. “Together with our allies and partners, we can ensure maritime security and adherence to international rules and norms that allow all countries to continue to prosper. We are very proud to operate with our COFA partners and continue to enhance our strong partnerships. “

Russell’s transits and operations across Oceania demonstrate the US commitment to upholding its agreements with COFA countries, while also building trust with emerging strategic partners such as PNG, in supporting advancing international rules and norms on the high seas.

“My crew and I enjoy the opportunity to undertake a Cooperative Deployment with USS Russell,” said Lt. Cmdr. Paulino Yangitesmal, Commander of the Palikir FSS. “Even without COVID interfering with our ability to complete training at sea with like-minded partners, we rarely come across a warship of this size and capability. We look forward to further opportunities as they become available. “

Russell, part of Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike 7, is on a scheduled deployment to the US 7th Fleet’s operations area. The 7th Fleet remains ready to respond to the crisis in Oceania, supporting the region in the event of a Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR) operation, while supporting COFA commitments. The Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Russell (DDG 59) completed its Oceania transit operation and presence on January 18 interacting with partners and upholding commitments with the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia and Papua New Guinea.

Russell made a brief stop for fuel at Majuro, RMI January 7. After successfully completing refueling and refueling at Majuro, Russell undertook a Cooperative Deployment with two FSM National Police Maritime Surveillance Division patrol boats around Pohnpei, FSM. The ship completes its transit through Oceania, rich in fisheries, by patrolling the offshore enclave of the Compact of Free Association (COFA) state to prevent illegal, unregulated, unreported (IUU) fishing.

“USS Russell is honored to work with the state of COFA to foster our lasting partnership in the region,” said Cmdr. Ryan Rogers, commander Russell. “Our operation shows our support for these wonderful countries in a beautiful region of the world that is rich with naval history.”

The COFA agreement establishes free association relations between the United States and the three Pacific Island sovereign states of the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.

“All countries benefit from free and open access to the sea,” said Captain Steve McDowell, Commodore, Squadron of Twenty-Three Destroyers. “Together with our allies and partners, we can ensure maritime security and adherence to international rules and norms that allow all countries to continue to prosper. We are very proud to operate with our COFA partners and continue to enhance our strong partnerships. “

Russell’s transits and operations across Oceania demonstrate the US commitment to upholding its agreements with COFA countries, while also building trust with emerging strategic partners such as PNG, in supporting advancing international rules and norms on the high seas.

“My crew and I enjoy the opportunity to undertake a Cooperative Deployment with USS Russell,” said Lt. Cmdr. Paulino Yangitesmal, Commander of the Palikir FSS. “Even without COVID interfering with our ability to complete training at sea with like-minded partners, we rarely come across a warship of this size and capability. We look forward to further opportunities as they become available. “

Russell, part of Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group, is on a scheduled deployment to the US 7th Fleet’s operations area. The 7th Fleet remains ready to respond to the crisis in Oceania, supporting the region in the event of a Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR) operation, while supporting COFA commitments.

As the US Navy’s largest forward fleet, the US 7th Fleet routinely operates between 50-70 ships and submarines and 140 aircraft with about 20,000 Sailors. The 7th Fleet’s operating area covers more than 124 million square kilometers, stretching from the International Date Line to the India / Pakistan border; and from the Kuril Islands in the North to Antarctica in the South Pacific, providing security and stability in the region. The 7th Fleet interacts with 35 other maritime nations to build partnerships that foster maritime security while undertaking a variety of missions to support humanitarian efforts and enforce international law and maritime freedoms. ) completed the transit operation and Oceania presence on 18 January interacting with partners and enforcing commitments with the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia and Papua New Guinea.

Russell made a brief stop for fuel at Majuro, RMI January 7. After successfully completing refueling and refueling at Majuro, Russell undertook a Cooperative Deployment with two FSM National Police Maritime Surveillance Division patrol boats around Pohnpei, FSM. The ship completes its transit through Oceania, rich in fisheries, by patrolling the offshore enclave of the Compact of Free Association (COFA) state to prevent illegal, unregulated, unreported (IUU) fishing.

“USS Russell is honored to work with the state of COFA to foster our lasting partnership in the region,” said Cmdr. Ryan Rogers, commander Russell. “Our operation shows our support for these wonderful countries in a beautiful region of the world that is rich with naval history.”

The COFA agreement establishes free association relations between the United States and the three Pacific Island sovereign states of the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.

“All countries benefit from free and open access to the sea,” said Captain Steve McDowell, Commodore, Destroyer Squadron 23. “Together with our allies and partners, we can ensure maritime security and adherence to international rules and norms that apply to all countries. to continue to prosper. We are very proud to operate with our COFA partners and continue to enhance our strong partnerships. “

Russell’s transits and operations across Oceania demonstrate the US commitment to upholding its agreements with COFA countries, while also building trust with emerging strategic partners such as PNG, in supporting advancing international rules and norms on the high seas.

“My crew and I enjoy the opportunity to undertake a Cooperative Deployment with USS Russell,” said Lt. Cmdr. Paulino Yangitesmal, Commander of the Palikir FSS. “Even without COVID interfering with our ability to complete training at sea with like-minded partners, we rarely come across a warship of this size and capability. We look forward to further opportunities as they become available. “

Russell, part of Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group, is on a scheduled deployment to the US 7th Fleet’s operations area. The 7th Fleet remains ready to respond to the crisis in Oceania, supporting the region in the event of a Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR) operation, while supporting COFA commitments.

As the US Navy’s largest forward fleet, the US 7th Fleet routinely operates between 50-70 ships and submarines and 140 aircraft with about 20,000 Sailors. The 7th Fleet’s operating area covers more than 124 million square kilometers, stretching from the International Date Line to the India / Pakistan border; and from the Kuril Islands in the North to Antarctica in the South Pacific, providing security and stability in the region. The 7th Fleet interacts with 35 other maritime nations to build partnerships that promote maritime security while undertaking various missions to support humanitarian efforts and enforce international law and maritime freedoms.

As the US Navy’s largest forward fleet, the US 7th Fleet routinely operates between 50-70 ships and submarines and 140 aircraft with about 20,000 Sailors. The 7th Fleet’s operating area covers more than 124 million square kilometers, stretching from the International Date Line to the India / Pakistan border; and from the Kuril Islands in the North to Antarctica in the South Pacific, providing security and stability in the region. The 7th Fleet interacts with 35 other maritime nations to build partnerships that promote maritime security while undertaking various missions to support humanitarian efforts and enforce international law and maritime freedoms.



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Australia’s human rights record will be assessed this week | Instant News


United Nations member states will this week berate Australia over human rights issues as part of its Universal Periodic Review (UPR).

The study involves assessing the extent to which the 193 UN member states are meeting their human rights obligations.

UPR Working Group will examine Australia’s human rights record for the third time on Wednesday, the UN Human Rights Council said in a statement on Friday.

Review – who will broadcast on UN Web TV – will be based on reports provided by the Australian government, reports from human rights groups, and information provided by other stakeholders.

Attorney General’s Department first assistant Andrew Walter will lead the Australian delegation, while Italy, the Marshall Islands and Senegal will be the reporters.

In its report to the Human Rights Council, the government said Australia had “made significant achievements in the realization of human rights” since its last review in November 2015, including “significant investments to address domestic and domestic violence, human trafficking and modern slavery and legalization of marriage. Same-sex “.

“Australia welcomes the opportunity to participate in the third cycle of the UPR and to discuss achievements and opportunities for improvement in protecting and promoting human rights,” he wrote.


Read more: A national human rights charter could aid public acceptance of the government’s decision-making process, the Law Council said


A number of member states have raised questions to Australia ahead of Wednesday’s review, touching on issues ranging from racism to immigration detention and the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in prisons.

Poland has asked what precautions have been taken to stop children from entering the justice system, while Germany wants to know what is stopping Australia from raising the age of criminal responsibility from 10 to at least 14.

Meanwhile, Panama has asked what action has been taken to tackle rampant expressions of racism, racial discrimination and xenophobia in Australia.

Britain, on the other hand, has asked Australia to explain its plans to “work with, and listen to, Indigenous elders and leaders to cast a national voice to Parliament for Indigenous peoples”.

The Australian Government will have the opportunity to express its views on any recommendations made during its review later this month.

The 37th UPR was planned to be held in November 2020, but was postponed due to the corona virus pandemic.


Read more: ‘We need to have a tough conversation’: Rosalind Croucher on human rights reform




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Glenn Grosshuesch | Obituary | yankton.net | Instant News


Glenn Grosshuesch, Yankton’s 95 year old, died January 16, 2021 at Avera Majestic Bluffs in Yankton. Due to COVID-19 a family and dhikr service will be held by the end of 2021.

Glenn was born April 13, 1925 in Yankton, SD and is the third son of Oscar and Leona (Auch) Grosshuesch. He attended Yankton public school until he answered the call for duty, serving in the US Navy as a member of the Armed Guard, manning weapons on merchant ships. The first act experienced was in the Marshall Islands. On board the SS Glackens, he received several large bruises when there was a shipwreck in the China Strait near New Guinea. Aboard the SS Sioux Falls he invaded Okinawa. He is also a charter member of the National Guard unit in Springfield, SD, serving six years.

Returning to Yankton after the war, he married the love of his life, Phyllis Brunick June 20, 1948. They met and dated while he was on leave from the Marines. They have three children, Mike, Debra and Roger.

Glenn received his high school diploma by taking the GED test. He earned a BS at Southern State college in Springfield and a Masters degree at CSU in Fort Collins, CO. He taught college for 30 years, first teaching body repair and then head of the Vocational Teacher Education Department and held the position until the college closed in 1984. His program was transferred to Dakota State College in Madison and after teaching there for one year, he receive early retirement.

He is an active member of the Mount Zion Masonic Lodge working through the chair and serving as District Teacher. He is also a member of the Springfield fire department and a member of the city council. As a member of the UCC church in Springfield, he loves to accompany and is also a member of several church boards.

After retiring in 1985, Glenn and Phyllis became snowbirds, towing the 5th wheel trailer. After selling their home to Mike and Carla, they became full-time RVers, camping in Florida, Texas, and Arizona. They are charter members of the Saguaro Coop in Benson, AZ. The most memorable trip was via the Alcan Highway to Alaska and arriving back at Benson five months later.

Glenn is survived by his beautiful 72 year old wife, Phyllis; Mike and Carla from Springfield, Debra and Ray Madzia from Sierra Vista, AZ and Roger and Jack Bradley from Homosassa, FL; grandson of Cory and Nikki of Sioux Falls; stepson of Ashley Pruss; great-granddaughter of Emma Sue and stepdaughter of Andy Jacobs of Springfield.

He was preceded by death by his parents; brothers Jerry and wives Dorothy Gross and Col Lee and wife Andi Grossheusch; brother-in-law Stanley and Marjory’s wife Orville and wife Janice, Lloyd and wife Reva Brunick and sisters-in-law Bea and Marvin Auch.

The family would like to thank the nursing home and Majestic Bluffs for all the love and care they have given Glenn during her time in their care.

The Goglin Funeral Home is honored to serve Glenn Grosshuesch’s family and friends, www.goglinfh.com

Yankton Press & Dakotan

19 January 2021

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Ince Piraeus added lateral recruiting to expand the dispatch team | Instant News


International legal and professional services firm Ince has announced the recruitment of Konstantinos (Dinos) Mexias as Partner at Piraeus, to strengthen its already world-leading shipping team.

Dinos is an accomplished finance specialist, with skills in all aspects of ship finance. During his career, most recently at Watson Farley & Williams, he has advised and acted on behalf of major banks, private equity investors and shipping companies, both private and listed. His expertise in ship finance includes loan financing, sale and leaseback transactions, restructuring and transfer of loan portfolios, as well as issues related to company acquisitions and ship sales and purchases. Dinos also advises on the Marshall Islands and Liberia’s maritime and corporate legal issues.

Recognized for practicing law in Greece, New York, England & Wales and the Marshall Islands, Dinos is a multi-faceted lawyer capable of handling complex shipping and financial matters, across multiple jurisdictions and listed as a new star in shipping finance by Legal 500 EMEA and a leading practitioner based on the IFLR 1000 legal directory.

The subsequent recruitment of Dinos demonstrates Ince’s continued commitment to growing and investing in its international maritime finance offering. Stuart McAlpine joined the firm of Clyde & Co as Global Head of Marine Projects last year, and his consultancy launched a new business in the Middle East, offering clients worldwide end-to-end transactions and consulting capabilities for all of their maritime. financial need.
Speaking about his new role, Dinos Mexias stated: “I am delighted to be joining Ince and being part of an established legal team, with some of the best lawyers in the maritime sector. The company’s growing shipping finance team would be the ideal platform for me to provide high-quality services to clients and expand my shipping practices. I look forward to joining Robin Parry and Ronan Le Du and their teams in this well-known ship finance practice and to work with my new colleagues at Ince to further strengthen the company’s highly regarded service offering. “

Commenting on the appointment, Paul Herring, Head of Office, Ince Piraeus said: “Last year we saw a significant record number of recruits across our international shipping team and I am pleased to demonstrate our continued commitment to investing in our team since the start of the year. Joining Dinos in our business in Greece will strengthen our shipping finance practices and help bring our leading services in the maritime sector closer to current and potential clients. “

Julian Clark, Senior Global Partner, said: “I am delighted to have Dinos on board. There is no doubt that Ince is back leading from the front and the addition of Dinos to the team underlines our commitment to the maritime sector. “
Source: Ince



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