‘Fast fashion’ is killing the planet – and British buyers are the most wasteful | Instant News


‘Fast fashion’ is slowly helping to kill the planet – and British buyers are the most extravagant, a study has warned.

The clothing industry produces more than 92 million tons of waste per year and consumes around 1.5 trillion tons of water per year.

Developing countries bear most of this excess burden.

In the UK, more garments are bought per person per year than anywhere else in Europe – an amazing weight of 59 pounds.

This is more than double the global average of 29 lbs – and nearly double that of fashion conscious Italian consumers, who buy an average of 32 lbs each.

Meanwhile, the Germans – the second most extravagant – bought only £ 37 per person.

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‘Fast fashion’ is slowly helping to kill the planet – and British buyers are the most extravagant, a study has warned. The clothing industry produces more than 92 million tons of waste per year and consumes around 1.5 trillion tons of water per year

“Consequently, the timing of garment use decreased 36 percent compared to 2005,” said paper writer and design researcher Kirsi Niinimaki from Aalto University in Finland.

“There is evidence in the United Kingdom, Norway and elsewhere that suggests disposal after little use, especially for impulsive purchases.”

Fast mode is based on low-priced, trend-led products – and relies on ‘repeat consumption’. This practice is a ‘major environmental threat’, said Professor Niinimaki.

The constant change in the contents of the wardrobe must be stopped – and replaced by new trends dubbed ‘slow style’, the researchers said.

Shoes, dresses, shirts, trousers and coats need to last for years – not months – to combat climate change, they added.

Buyers also have to pay more, with the ‘environmental impact’ of their purchases reflected in prices, the team concluded.

According to Professor Niinimaki, consumers should start to see clothing ‘more as a functional product than entertainment.’

‘Slow mode is the future. But we need an understanding of the whole new system of how to transition to this model, ‘he added.

“This requires creativity and collaboration between designers and producers, various stakeholders – and consumers.”

“Consumers also have an important role and must change their consumption habits.”

“They must be prepared to pay a higher price that takes into account the environmental impact of fashion – namely reducing clothing purchases and increasing the lifetime of the garment.”

Fashion is now the second largest industrial polluter after aviation, accounting for 10 percent or more than 1.7 billion tons of global carbon dioxide emissions each year

Fashion is now the second largest industrial polluter after aviation, accounting for 10 percent or more than 1.7 billion tons of global carbon dioxide emissions each year

Fashion is now the second largest industrial polluter after aviation, which accounts for 10 percent or more than 1.7 billion tons of global carbon dioxide emissions each year.

Textile care and dyeing is responsible for one third of the micro-plastic pollution in the oceans – 190,000 tons per year.

Global clothing production has doubled in 15 years. The British spend around 2.7 billion pounds on items that we wear only once.

“Global consumption has increased to around 62 million tons of textile products per year, and is projected to reach 102 million by 2030,” said Professor Niinimaki.

“As a result, fashion brands now produce almost double the amount of clothing now compared to before 2000.”

Consumer thirst for the latest clothing has been triggered by social media.

Every year, clothing worth around £ 140 million goes to landfill.

“However, this industry continues to grow, although awareness of the environmental impact is increasing, in part due to the increasing rapid mode,” said Professor Niinimaki.

“That depends on cheap manufacturing, frequent consumption, and the use of short-lived garments.”

“Global consumption has increased to around 62 million tons of textile products per year, and is projected to reach 102 million by 2030,” said Professor Niinimaki. “As a result, fashion brands now produce almost double the amount of clothing now compared to before 2000 ‘

In their study, Professor Niinimaki and colleagues identified the environmental impact of fast fashion, from production to consumption.

They focus on water use, chemical pollution, carbon dioxide emissions and textile waste.

The findings, said Professor Niinimaki, ‘highlighted the need for substantial changes in the industry, including a slowdown in manufacturingctouring and introduction of sustainable practices throughout the supply chain.

A joint approach is needed, the team added, with investments in cleaner technology, sustainable business models and stronger laws by the government.

“This change emphasizes the need for an urgent transition back to” slow “mode, minimizing and reducing adverse environmental impacts,” said Prof. Niinimaki.

Full findings from this study were published in the journal Nature & Earth Reviews.

Fashion designer Stella McCartney, in the picture, has urged people to wash clothes - including underwear - less frequently. The more you wash clothes, the faster it wears out. In fact, it is estimated that the average life span for clothing items in the UK is only 2.2 years

Fashion designer Stella McCartney, in the picture, has urged people to wash clothes – including underwear – less frequently. The more you wash clothes, the faster it wears out. In fact, it is estimated that the average life span for clothing items in the UK is only 2.2 years

Fashion designer Stella McCartney has urged people to wash clothes – including underwear – less frequently.

The more you wash clothes, the faster it wears out. In fact, it is estimated that the average life span for clothing items in the UK is only 2.2 years.

Ms. McCartney recently revealed that she doesn’t wash bras every day – and avoids cleaning anything if possible.

‘The rule on bespoke settings is you don’t clean it. You don’t touch it. You let the soil dry and you brush it, ‘he said.

‘Basically, in life, a rule of thumb: if you don’t really have to clean anything, don’t clean it.

“I’m not going to change bras every day and I’m not just throwing things in the washing machine because it’s been used.

“I’m very hygienic myself, but I’m not a fan of dry cleaning or cleaning anything, really.”

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