Coronavirus Germany: The epidemic peaked below 1,500 deaths | Instant News


German today saw a sharp decline in his daily deaths and the number of toll cases, fueling hopes that had never happened before coronavirus lockdown works.

Health officials recorded only 3,677 new cases – the lowest number since March 22 – and 92 deaths, one day of the fewest deaths a week.

But Germany, which has recorded fewer than 1,500 deaths, is not the only European country whose outbreak seems flat.

Data collected by World Health Organization to show ItalyThis deadly virus outbreak is slowing down or at least stabilizing.

But Italy’s cumulative death rate at the time seemed to reach its ‘peak’ more than six times that of Germany, at 9,140.

Spain, Belgium, Norway and Austria all also appear to have peaked cases and deaths in the past two weeks.

Despite promising improvements, the possibility of increasing new daily records cannot be ruled out because the pandemic is not over.

Elsewhere in Europe, Britain, France, Sweden and Denmark all seem to be at their peak, or close to it.

At present the British daily death doll doubles every two or three days. But cases and deaths seem to grow at a slower rate.

The number of German daily deaths today has fallen to only 92. The dramatic decline in daily deaths occurred nine days after its peak in the case on March 28, indicating that its worst outbreak has passed. Spain and Italy also report lower deaths every day

How many cases are recorded by European countries per day: Some seem to come out of the other side of their outbreak, including Italy, Germany, Spain and the Netherlands

How many cases are recorded by European countries per day: Some seem to come out of the other side of their outbreak, including Italy, Germany, Spain and the Netherlands

A man wearing a mask in Berlin today, because Germany recorded the lowest case of the virus since March 22

A man wearing a mask in Berlin today, because Germany recorded the lowest case of the virus since March 22

A woman walks to the temporary care center 19 at Signal Iduna Park, home of Borussia Dortmund, on Monday

A woman walks to the temporary care center 19 at Signal Iduna Park, home of Borussia Dortmund, on Monday

The number of daily deaths in Germany today drops to only 92, only 24 hours after the country reports the highest number of daily deaths of 184.

New infections also fell for the fourth day to 3,677, raising hopes that coronavirus locking worked.

The dramatic decline in daily deaths occurred nine days after its peak in the case on March 28, indicating that its worst outbreak had passed.

A woman stands in a temporary coronavirus treatment center at Signal Iduna Park, home of Borussia Dortmund, on Monday

A woman stands in a temporary coronavirus treatment center at Signal Iduna Park, home of Borussia Dortmund, on Monday

COUNTRIES THAT THEY MAY HAVE?

German

Peak cases: March 28 6,294 new cases were recorded

Death peak: April 5, 184 new deaths recorded

Italy

Peak cases: March 22, 6557 new cases were recorded

Mortality peak: March 28, 971 new deaths recorded

Spanish

Peak cases: April 1, 9,222 new cases were recorded

Death peak: April 3, 950 new deaths were recorded

Netherlands

Peak cases: March 28, 1,172 new cases were recorded

Death peak: April 1, 175 new deaths are recorded

Belgium

Peak cases: March 29, 1,850 new cases were recorded

Death peak: April 1, 192 new deaths recorded

Norway

Peak cases: March 28, 425 new cases were recorded

Death peak: April 3, 10 new deaths recorded

Austria

Top cases: 27 March, 1,141 new cases recorded

Mortality peak: March 21, 22 new deaths recorded

The data shows death rates lagging behind cases around four to seven days, which is why for a period of time the cases appear to be slowing while deaths continue to increase.

The Italian outbreak shows the same pattern – the highest jump in new cases was recorded on March 22. Eight days later, on April 5, his daily death rate reached an all-time high.

The country has consistently recorded lower rates every day for more than a week – around 4,500 new cases and 700 new deaths – giving hope that it will eventually come out of the dark.

Both countries have the same average number for new daily cases during the peak – 6,300 for Germany and 6,560 for Italy. But Germany is testing far more people.

Their total cases are also not far from each other, with Italy reporting 124,632 today, and Germany 95,391.

But the mortality rates of the two countries differ dramatically. On Italy’s worst day of death recorded, it already had a total of 9,136 deaths, compared to 1,434 Germans.

Spain also has more than 10,000 total deaths on the bleakest day so far – on April 3, when 950 deaths were reported in 24 hours.

Italy continues to be reluctant to lead deaths due to the corona virus, with a total of 15,362.

Figures show Britain’s peak is looming, with officials predicting it will be in six to nine days, possibly on Easter Sunday.

Last week, the NHS England announced new daily death highs, reaching a peak of 708 on Saturday.

Over the past two days, it has dropped to 621 and 403. Statistics are a ray of hope because today’s increase in mortality is the lowest since March 31, when it was 381.

However, yesterday’s case jumped 5,903 – the highest yet. With the death rate lagging a few days behind, it might be too early to say that the burden of the plague is over.

Yesterday, the British case jumped 5,903 - the highest yet. With the death rate lagging a few days behind, it might be better to feel hope that the peak of the plague is behind us

Yesterday, the British case jumped 5,903 – the highest yet. With the death rate lagging a few days behind, it might be better to feel hope that the peak of the plague is behind us

Has GERMANY RUN LIGHT?

Germany seems to have escaped the global pandemic lightly compared to its neighbors.

Although the case is not far behind Spain and Italy, the death rate is much lower – around 1.6 percent, when dividing reported cases by deaths.

The number of daily deaths in Germany today drops to only 92, only 24 hours after the country reports the highest number of daily deaths of 184.

New infections also fell for the fourth day to 3,677 amid hopes that the corona virus locking worked.

But Dr Derek Gatherer, an infectious disease expert, said it was still too early for Germany to win over the numbers.

He said: “Today is Monday, and if there is less testing over the weekend, there are always lower numbers on Monday, so we have to watch Germany tomorrow to see if this applies there too.”

This is why the number of German deaths may be lower:

Testing

This is the decision of Germany to implement extensive testing of people suspected of having coronavirus.

About 500,000 residents are being tested a week, according to Professor Christian Drosten, the virologist who is responsible for the country’s response.

Germany seems to be able to get tests from domestic producers while Britain has to import it.

Germany is home to a strong network of biotech and pharmaceutical companies, including Landt, which has created and helped distribute four million COVID-19 tests, Bloomberg report.

It is believed that Germany will also take the lead with a highly sought-after antibody test, which can see if someone already has a virus and builds immunity.

Such checks could potentially allow people to be issued with certificates stating that they are safe to return to work, allowing the economy to start over.

National private laboratories are free to offer tests. But in the UK, UK Public Health is reluctant to expand testing facilities outside 12 centralized labs.

Germany conducted testing in mid-February, epidemiology professor Nathan Grubaugh, at the Yale School of Public Health, told Business Insider.

On April 2, a private laboratory in Germany helped the country test one million people for COVID-19.

Age of infected person

The average age of patients is lower than in countries like Italy, which has a very old population, which means they are more likely to die.

The majority – 80 percent – of all people infected in Germany younger than 60, according to official figures from the Robert Koch Institute.

There is speculation that the first group of cases came from ‘super-spreaders’ who returned from skiing trips in Austria and Italy, who might be fitter and younger.

Strong health care system

Hospitals in Germany are better prepared, Wired report.

This country has the most intensive care per person than any other country in Europe.

A 2011 study found that the bed had 29.2 intensive care places per 100,000 people – far more than 12.5 per 100,000 in Italy, 9.7 in Spain or only 6.6 in the UK.

Officials say German hospitals are already in a condition to deal with the epidemic, with beds and ventilators that are quite intensive. Meanwhile, Italian hospitals have been overwhelmed and there are fears the British health system will be under pressure.

How the country reports death

Dr Gatherer said that each country reports its death differently, which may be behind different mortality rates.

“It is very difficult to know why various countries in Europe have different numbers of deaths,” he said. “It might have something to do with the way deaths were recorded, for example a distinction might be made between deaths with COVID-19 and deaths from COVID-19.”

France, Sweden and Denmark are in the same position, having seen a jump in the daily case of the past few days.

In the initial stages of this pandemic, it is difficult to draw firm conclusions about how countries deal with one another.

It should also be noted that the figures do not adjust for reporting delays, which are the time between deaths occur, and are announced. Delay reporting does not have to be the same in every country.

But there is a clear link between the country’s response to the pandemic, and the scale of its spread so far.

Germany has been praised for handling an unprecedented situation, and the British government was ridiculed for not following in its footsteps.

His low death rate – around 1.6 percent – has been attributed in large part to a strict testing regime, tracking anyone who has come in contact with positive cases.

About half a million people are being tested per week. In comparison, UK testing capacity is around 70,000 a week.

This is for a number of reasons, including Germany being able to increase domestic testing capacity.

Professor Lawrence Young, virologist and professor of molecular oncology at the University of Warwick, noted that German testing was not carried out by one central authority – such as British Public Health – but by around 400 public health offices.

This allows laboratories to be stretched throughout the country which acts largely autonomously from central control. On April 2, the private laboratory tested one million amazing people, People in business report.

Professor Young told MailOnline: ‘Strong supervision (testing) to find, isolate, track and handle every case is what happened in Germany and South Korea.

‘German public health services have also assisted with 400 public health offices run by municipal and rural district administrations throughout the Federal republic.

‘But also the fact that the Robert Koch Institute in Germany supports this public health office and facilitates engagement with the German biotech industry to produce tests in mid-January and then launch it throughout the country.

“Germany also has more virologists who are mobilized early and respond quickly to work with industry to produce diagnostic tests.”

Official figures from the Robert Koch Institute show the majority of infected people in Germany under the age of 60, which can explain why fewer people are dying.

Italy has a very old population, which according to experts explains a higher mortality rate – 12 percent when dividing reported cases by death.

Dr Derek Gatherer, an infectious disease expert, said it was still too early for Germany to win over the numbers.

He said: “Today is Monday, and if there is less testing over the weekend, there are always lower numbers on Monday, so we have to watch Germany tomorrow to see if this applies there too.

‘I think we might revise these figures for a while. However, decreasing the number of deaths consistently, but they are noted, in any country, will be one signal that locking can be reduced. ‘

Figures show Belgium and the Netherlands have come out from the other side, reporting a total of 1,283 and 1,651 deaths respectively.

At its peak, on April 1, they each reported between 150-200 deaths per day, quite unscathed compared to their European neighbors.

Further behind are Austria and Norway, who reported 22 and 10 deaths respectively in their worst days. They each had 186 and 50 total deaths.

Both countries impose locking when the number of cases is below 3,000.

In comparison, Prime Minister Boris Johnson closed Britain on March 24, when there were 6,650 cases and 335 deaths.

Their testing capacity is also unmatched in Europe – the government tests between 12,000 and 19,000 per million population every day.

The British testing regime, which reaches a small number of people in hospitals, has been severely criticized for failing to paint an accurate picture of how many people are infected.

Imperial College London maps how each country responds to a pandemic

Imperial College London maps how each country responds to a pandemic

HOW IS EVERY STATE COMPARED?

English

Lockdown takes effect: March 24

Cases and deaths when locked: 6,650 / 335

Testing: 2,895 per 1 million

German

Lockdown takes effect: March 22

Cases and deaths when locked: 21,463 / 67

Testing: 11,046 per 1 million

Italy

Lockdown takes effect: March 11

Cases and deaths when locked: 10,149 / 631

Testing: 10,896 per 1 million

Spanish

Lockdown takes effect: March 14

Cases and deaths when locked: 4,231 / 120

Testing: 7,596 per 1 million

Austria

Lockdown takes effect: March 16

Cases and deaths when locked: 959/1

Testing: 12,502 per 1 million

France

Lockdown takes effect: March 17

Cases and deaths when locked: 6,573 / 148

Testing: 3,346 per 1 million

Belgium

Lockdown takes effect: March 18

Cases and deaths when locked: 1,486 / 14

Testing: 1,594 per 1 million

Denmark

Lockdown takes effect: March 18

Cases and deaths when locked: 977/4

Testing: 8,306 per 1 million

Switzerland

Lockdown takes effect: March 20

Cases and deaths when locked: 3,863 / 33

Testing: 17,904 per 1 million

Norway

Lockdown takes effect: March 24

Cases and deaths when locked: 2,371/8

Testing: 19,000 per 1 million

Netherlands

Lockdown takes effect: March 15

Cases and deaths when locked: 959/12

Testing: 4,328 per 1 million

Sweden

Locked locked: Not locked

Current cases and deaths: 6,443 / 373

Testing: 4,306 per 1 million

How Europe plans to lock up: Austria will open small shops next week, Denmark wants to ‘stagger’ back to work and Germany can reopen schools if infection rates remain low

With the Stickings Team

When Britain and America begin to make plans for life after closure, they may seek inspiration from European countries coronavirus The crisis has shown signs of mounting.

Austria today became the first country to set a detailed plan to end the impasse, with small shops reopening on April 14 and larger ones on May 1.

Denmark also plans to start lifting restrictions after Easter, but wants people to ‘work in a more staggered way’ to avoid crowding on trains and buses.

Meanwhile German willing to reopen schools by region and allow a small number of people to enter restaurants if infection rates remain low.

In Italy, which has been locked longer than other European countries, officials speak of a ‘phase two’ in which people learn to ‘live with a virus’ by wearing masks and doing more tests.

Italy and Germany are among the countries that observe smartphone tracking, which can enable them to carry out new outbreaks without sending everyone back inside.

All of these countries, along with Spain, have seen signs of an increase in their latest figures offering hope that the crisis has passed its peak. That moment will still come for Britain and America, who are preparing for one of their bleakest weeks.

However, health officials across Europe warned that life could not return ‘from 0 to 100’ immediately and many locking actions would remain in force for several weeks at least.

Spain is planning more tests and some are returning to work

135,032 confirmed cases, 13,055 deaths

Spain has been locked since March 14 because it fought one of the worst outbreaks in the world, with the number of cases now higher than in Italy.

However, new infection rates have fallen to record lows, offering hope that the action is successful.

Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said that some economic restrictions could be lifted after Easter, allowing some people in non-essential jobs to return to work.

However, shops, bars and restaurants will remain closed, and many locking actions will likely last beyond the current deadline on April 26.

Nadia Calvino, minister of economics in the Sanchez government, told El Pais that the ministers had begun to discuss a way out of the lockdown.

“We must establish measures and conditions that minimize the risk of prolonged transmission, which will allow us to keep the virus from being held. It is not possible to process 0 to 100 in one day, ‘he said.

Calvino refused to answer whether workers should return to their jobs wearing masks and gloves.

The government says one million test kits will arrive in Spain on Sunday and Monday, and will act as ‘rapid screening’ in places such as hospitals and nursing homes.

The number of daily Spanish infections has fallen sharply from its peak, and today's increase of 3.3 percent is the smallest

The number of daily Spanish infections has fallen sharply from its peak, and today’s increase of 3.3 percent is the smallest

This chart shows the number of daily deaths in Spain, which also shows signs of falling from the recent peak

This chart shows the number of daily deaths in Spain, which also shows signs of falling from the recent peak

Austria will reopen the store but prohibit public meetings

12,008 cases, 220 deaths

Small shops like this on the Vienna market will reopen next week in Austria

Small shops like this on the Vienna market will reopen next week in Austria

Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz today became the first European leader to give a specific date for the end of the lockdown.

Kurz said the aim was to reopen small shops soon after April 14, with a bigger one and a shopping center opening on May 1 if all went well.

“The aim is that from April 14 … small shops up to 400 square meters in size, hardware stores and parks can be reopened, under tight security conditions of course,” Kurz told a press conference.

Customers will be asked to wear masks when the store reopens, extending the requirements that already apply to supermarkets. Masks will also be required for public transportation.

Hotels and restaurants may reopen in mid-May, with a decision later this month. Schools will remain closed until mid-May and public events will remain banned until the end of June, Kurz said.

The Austrian health ministry said the rate of new infections has dropped significantly, and Kurz wants to “gradually and carefully return to normal after Easter” as long as “we all remain disciplined during Easter week”.

If the numbers get worse again, the government “always has the possibility to apply emergency brakes” and reintroduce restrictions, he said.

Denmark wants to ‘stagger’ back to work because restrictions abate after Easter

4,647 cases, 179 deaths

Denmark wants to avoid overcrowding on trains such as the Copenhagen metro service (photo)

Denmark wants to avoid overcrowding on trains such as the Copenhagen metro service (photo)

Denmark has been locked since March 11, but wants to start lifting steps after Easter if there is no surge in new cases.

In an interview with DK Last night, Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen said the government hoped for “Denmark’s gradual, controlled and calm reopening”.

He suggested that people go to work ‘in a more staggered way’ to avoid excessive crowds on public transportation.

The PM gave no details about what the ‘staggered’ return to work would be like.

However, he warned that ‘we will not return to Denmark as before’ when the first restriction was lifted.

“We will not be able to get together on trains, buses and subways in the way we normally do,” he said.

“Or stand very close together with many others and have a good party together.”

Italy plans to ‘live with the virus’ using more masks and special hospitals

128,948 confirmed cases, 15,887 deaths

Italy openly talks about ‘phase two’ in which people must ‘create conditions for living with viruses’ until vaccines are developed.

Health Minister Roberto Speranza said more testing and an improved local health system would be needed to ease lockdown.

He said the social distance must remain in place, with wider use of personal protective equipment such as face masks.

Testing and ‘contact tracking’ will be expanded, including with the use of smartphone applications, to accommodate new outbreaks.

A network of hospitals will also be formed which is specifically dedicated to virus patients, after doctors in the existing wards explain having to make life or death decisions on access to intensive care.

“There are difficult months ahead. Our task is to create conditions for living with the virus, ‘at least until the vaccine is developed, the health minister told the La Repubblica newspaper.

National lockdown, which strictly limits people’s movements and freezes all non-essential economic activities, will officially take place at least April 13 but is widely expected to be extended.

Italy's daily infection count reaches a peak of 6,557 on March 21, but hasn't been above 5,000 in the past few days

Italy’s daily infection count reaches a peak of 6,557 on March 21, but hasn’t been above 5,000 in the past few days

Italy recorded 969 deaths in one day on March 27, but the figure has dropped since then, as shown on this graph

Italy recorded 969 deaths in one day on March 27, but the figure has dropped since then, as shown on this graph

Germany plans to open schools, shops and restaurants if infection rates remain low

95,391 cases, 1,434 deaths

Germany has set a plan to lift the restrictions as long as the infection rate remains below 1. That means each patient infects on average less than one other person.

If that is achieved, schools can be reopened regionally, shops can open their doors and restaurants can open with a limited number of people in closed spaces.

The plan was set out in an interior ministry document which also said that masks might become mandatory in any public building or on trains and buses.

The ministry announced plans today to place all travelers arriving in quarantine for 14 days, although not including health workers who live nearby.

Germany is also among the countries that suggest that antibody tests can signal a way out of locking, by allowing people with immunity to leave home.

This so-called ‘immunity passport’ can enable people to return to work and travel around Germany without worrying that they will spread the virus.

Christian Drosten, head of virology at the Charite hospital in Berlin, said the test could also ease the supply of medical equipment, because immune doctors would need less protective equipment. “These tests are the only practical way to bring things back to normal,” he told the NDR podcast recently.

The ministers also look to South Korea as a model for how to use smartphone tracking, although there are strict privacy laws in Germany where surveillance is a sensitive subject.

One German institution is developing an application that allows proximity and duration of contact between people to be stored for two weeks on the phone anonymously and without using location data.

Chancellor Angela Merkel said she would recommend using a tracking application if the tests on them proved successful.

Germany's biggest jump in the case so far is 6,294 announced on March 28, but today's number is only 3,677

Germany’s biggest jump in the case so far is 6,294 announced on March 28, but today’s number is only 3,677

The number of German daily deaths fell sharply to 92 today after previously showing signs of peaking by leveling around 140 days

The number of German daily deaths fell sharply to 92 today after previously showing signs of peaking by leveling around 140 days

France says lockdown cannot happen ‘one way and for everyone’

70,478 cases, 8078 deaths

France seems less close to lockdown, with figures improving less clearly than in Italy or Spain.

Deputy interior minister Laurent Nunez has warned that ‘the end of the confinement is not yet on the card, the deadline has not been set’.

“I remind you of the rules … someone comes out only when it’s really needed,” he said.

When asked about the matter last week, prime minister Edouard Philippe warned that the lock could not be lifted even once.

“It is very likely that we are not going to general deconfinement in one go and for everyone,” he told parliament via video link.

Philippe said the government was “struggling every hour” to ward off shortages of important drugs used to keep patients alive in intensive care.

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