Dismantling corona virus conspiracy in ‘Plandemic’ viral video| Instant News


Some “fake news” is more dangerous than others. Lies, distortions, and misinformation about the corona virus can be very deadly, which is why YouTube and Facebook must continue to delete posts for videos that have circulated widely on social media, gathering millions of viewers. The title, “Plandemic,” provides the premise: that the COVID-19 outbreak, and efforts to control it, are part of an evil conspiracy by people we trust to keep us safe.

fired from the Peterson Whittemore Institute for Neuro-Immune Disease in 2011 after his research on chronic fatigue syndrome was discredited and withdrawn. & nbsp; “data-reactid =” 26 “> 26-minute video, supposedly part of an older documentary” To be released this summer, starring Dr. Judy Mikovits – a scientist fired from the Peterson Whittemore Institute for Neuro-Immune Disease in 2011 after his research on chronic fatigue syndrome was discredited and withdrawn.

according to the New York Times involved in making videos “Bernie or Bust” and “Never Hillary” during the 2016 presidential campaign. “data-reactid =” 27 “> This video was produced by Mikki Willis, who according to the New York Times involved in making videos “Bernie or Bust” and “Never Hillary” during the 2016 presidential campaign.

“The coronavirus epidemic is very fertile soil for all types of coronavirus conspiracy theories. And I think this video is actually really a good indication for us about how much wrong information can come out quickly on social media, “Dr. Dara Kass, professor of emergency medicine at Columbia University Medical Center and medical contributor to Yahoo News. .

Judy A. Mikovits at the Peterson Whittemore Institute for Neuro-Immune Diseases in 2011 – the year she was fired there. (David Calvert for AP Pictures)

Yahoo News talks with Kass and Dr. Michael Saag, an epidemiologist at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, about the “Plandemic” viral video, and asked them to discuss some of his many medical claims.

“If we see things that will not only mislead people, but actually harm them, it is our duty to talk and say, ‘That’s not true,'” Saag told Yahoo News.

“Plandemic” is just one of many videos that blurt out baseless claims that we will likely encounter during the coronavirus pandemic, Saag and Kass said. Kass said the effect was “distracting people from whatever we are trying to say to those who may be uncomfortable, or difficult, or work hard, or may take longer than they want to hear.”

“The most important thing people can do is find out who their trusted advisors are, who are health professionals, policy makers, politicians they trust, if they can find it, and only listen to them,” he added.

Some “Plandemic” topics discussed – fake – include:

This video made several attempts to smear Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the ubiquitous facial response of the U.S. coronavirus One charge related to the controversial drug hydroxychloroquine. Mikovits mocked Fauci’s insistence that we only had anecdotal evidence supporting the use of chloroquine hydroxy for COVID-19 patients; he claims it is “an essential drug, and they protect it from people.”

released Friday found that “there was no benefit” for COVID-19 patients and could actually cause other health complications. & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; & nbsp; “data-reactid =” 47 “> Hydroxychloroquine, which is FDA-approved for treating malaria, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, has been described as a possible treatment for COVID-19, and is often cited as a” game changer “by President Trump. But as Fauci and others maintain, the effectiveness of the drug in treating COVID-19 has not been proven.Two studies released Friday found that “there was no benefit” for COVID-19 patients and could actually cause other health complications.

“It turns out that because more research has been done there may be a slight advantage in using hydroxychloroquine, but there are also risks in terms of heart rhythm problems that can cause sudden death,” Saag said. “What did Dr. Fauci says is, let’s study this carefully before we start promoting it. And actually that’s what happened. There are many studies now that will give us answers in a few months. But it is wrong to promote treatment where there is only anecdotal data, only a few cases here and there, especially when treatment can be dangerous in the setting of COVID-19. ”