The Wānaka tiny house dispute will likely end in court | Instant News


Krissy Bain and her sons Liam, 6, and Olly, 5, planned to live in their new tiny house in Wānaka but the landlord refused her access to her workplace to remove it.

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Krissy Bain and her sons Liam, 6, and Olly, 5, planned to live in their new tiny house in Wānaka but the landlord refused her access to her workplace to remove it.

The ongoing dispute over the tiny house of a single Wānaka-mother looks set to end in court.

Krissy Bain has built a $ 70,000 home on the Luggate property owned by Daniel Taylor’s parents under an informal agreement between the two.

However, when he decided to finish building elsewhere, Taylor locked the gates and prevented him from claiming them.

Three weeks ago he informed Goods she would free the house once Bain paid the two outstanding bills, signed the legal agreement and tidied up the section.

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The tiny house that Krissy Bain built to share with his sons.

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The tiny house that Krissy Bain built to share with his sons.

Since then Bain has paid lawyers to write a deal, based on the one proposed by Taylor, that includes a commitment to pay him the unpaid $ 1000 when he gets his hands on his tiny house.

She had paid him $ 8,000 for the work he had done on the house, he said.

Bain has also paid the remainder of the bill, owed an independent worker, and promised to clear up the portion when he gets access, he said.

Following his attorney’s advice, he also filed a lawsuit with the Dispute Court, which he hopes will not be necessary, with a court date set for December 9.

Taylor has not responded to him or his lawyer, and has not returned calls from Goods.

His father, Graham Taylor, said he had seen the official letter and was sure it would leave the Taylors open to further claims.

He wanted Bain to write a letter that would relieve them of any responsibility, instead of providing a legal agreement, and wanted Bain to pay the money owed directly to Taylor’s account.

RYAN ANDERSON / STUFF

Island Children’s Charity Trust Manager Danielle Bergin has built a tiny house on her property to accommodate those in need. (The video was first published in October 2020).

Bain says he is happy to do it, but needs a signed legal agreement to protect him as there is no trust between the parties.

Bain and sons Liam, 6, and Olly, 5, were expected to move into the house at the weekend but now face further delays.

“I have done everything in my power to solve this problem. I just want my house back, “he said.



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