Tag Archives: Airlines companies

American Airlines to Resume Hiring of Pilots this Fall as Travel Demand Recovers | Instant News



American Airlines Flight 718, the first U.S. commercial Boeing 737 MAX flight since regulators lifted a 20-month grounding in November, takes off from Miami, Florida, United States on December 29, 2020.Marco Bello | American Airlines plans to resume hiring pilots this fall, the carrier told Airmen on Tuesday, as a rebound in demand prompts airlines to rethink their future staffing. when the demand for travel fell. Last week, American announced plans to fly over 90% of its 2019 domestic schedule this summer. Bookings have since picked up, led by vacationers traveling to the United States, airlines recently reported. Also to restart hiring of pilots next month, while low cost carrier Spirit Airlines began training new pilots in March. JetBlue Airways also plans to start hiring pilots later this year. The Americans plan to start hiring 300 new pilots by the end of the year and plan to double that number in 2022, said Chip Long, vice -United States President of Air Operations. in a staff note, which was viewed by CNBC The Fort Worth-based carrier has around 15,000 pilots, though hundreds have retired early or are expected to quit flying in the coming years at age 65 , compulsory retirement age for airlines. Businesses and long-haul international demand remain weak as travel restrictions persist and large network operators continue to lose money. United on Monday reported a loss of $ 1.4 billion in the first quarter, while Delta Air Lines said last week that it lost nearly $ 1.2 billion in the first three months of the year. the market opens up. .



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Airlines are stepping up their summer schedules in the US with big planes | Instant News



The two-aisle Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner has a range of over 7,500 nautical miles, enough to carry passengers for 15 hours non-stop from Los Angeles to Sydney. This summer, American Airlines plans to use the 285-seater plane on several much shorter routes, such as Chicago to Orlando. With many overseas trips still entrenched in the pandemic, American and Delta Air Lines are choosing to put some of their large airliners on board. working on national routes or for shorter international trips is one of the ways airlines are rethinking their service in the pandemic. Planes are meant to fly long distances, filling up with better-paid passengers traveling overseas. If demand for international travel returns, as Americans expect this fall, the airline will end the practice. “It’s like buying a Porsche to drive it to church on Sunday,” said Brian Znotins, US vice president of network planning. there is usually at least one domestic service using jumbo jets on high-demand routes or to position planes in cities for long-haul flights, but the carrier is stepping up its domestic service with them. Executives say, but international reservations and service are still depressed due to quarantine requirements, closed attractions and outright entry bans such as that imposed on most non-citizens of much of the country. Europe entering the United States and vice versa. to fly Boeing 777s, its largest aircraft, from its Miami hub to John F. Kennedy International Airport in Los Angeles and New York. It will use 787s on some flights between Philadelphia and Orlando, and in Las Vegas from Philadelphia, Chicago and Miami. Delta uses Boeing 767s it would typically use for long-haul international flights on routes from Atlanta to Denver, Las Vegas, San Diego and its hub in Minneapolis-St. Paul. These planes and its Airbus A330 will fly to Hawaii from Seattle, Salt Lake City and Minneapolis-St. Paul, but also shorter flights like the Twin Cities to Phoenix. The idea is to “fill up the biggest boat you can find with very cheap seats and hope the fares come in,” said Robert Mann, industry analyst and former airline. The American is optimistic. “During the Easter break and spring break, the jumbo jets we were operating performed well on those days, but if you had a random Tuesday in mid-April, you’re not really going to run very full. anywhere in the system let alone on a large body, ”Znotins said.“ But as we move into Memorial Day and summer, just like a typical year, all the days of the week start to grow. fill in and that’s where we start to see the higher load factors. ”3,104 two-aisle flights on domestic routes in July and August, up from 563 a year ago and 2,846 in the same months of 2019, according to data from Ascend by Cirium, an aeronautical consultancy firm, aggressive major carriers by capitalizing on the rebound in domestic leisure travel, the upside of travel as coronavirus cases have declined from their peak and vaccination rates increase, and that attractions like Disneyland reopen. American said on Tuesday it plans to restore capacity to more than 90% of its 2019 domestic schedule this summer. “The Americans’ current strategy seems to be to fly as much as they can and worry about returns later,” said Brett Snyder, former director of the airline. who runs an air travel assistance company, Cranky Concierge, and writes the Cranky Flier blog. Single-aisle planes like those of the Boeing 737 and Airbus A320 families still account for the vast majority of flights in the United States, including that Americans. Its departures with single-lane mainline jets will increase to 189,862 in July and August, up from 92,391 last year and 155,084 in the summer of 2019, according to Cirium data. At American, Delta and United Airlines, these types of aircraft represent more than 70% of the domestic capacity expected in July and August, as before the pandemic. This year, the flight was hampered by the effective grounding of its fleet of Boeing 777s with Pratt and Whitney 4000 engines awaiting inspections after a failure shortly after take-off from a flight to Hawaii from Denver in February. .



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Up, up and away: the travel industry braces for a post-pandemic surge | Instant News



It seems that if we’ve learned anything after a year of staying home, it’s how much we love to get away from it all. And with the CDC’s restrictions easing and the number of people vaccinated each day, the virus travel is erupting everywhere, says National Geographic. collaborator Heather Greenwood Davis. Correspondent Tracy Smith asked, “Now that things are slackening off a bit, what do you see happening?” “We saw the ‘gray wave’, which is, you know, all the people who were sort of over the age of 65, who were getting these vaccines first – by the time they got them. received, they took off. They had all of these stations and beaches to themselves, “Davis said.” And now that the CDC is relaxing the guidelines for the rest of Americans, I think we’re about to see a great travel boom. People nibbled a bit to get out. And now that they have the chance, I think they will go “And they are going, okay: According to the Transportation Security Administration, more than 1.5 million people passed through airport security last Sunday. only. On the same day last year, the number was below 91,000. “It’s a brave new world right now,” said Peter Greenberg, editor of CBS News. He thinks that by summer the sky could be as crowded as ever. “We’re sitting in an airport,” Smith said. “This airport is not empty.” “I flew on the plane today, not a single seat available on the plane,” Greenberg said. “We’re back to the days when planes were full. All the airlines are unloading their planes. They’re taking them out of the warehouse. And by mid-May they’ll all be back in the air. . ” Passengers wearing face masks check in at the Delta Air Lines ticket counter at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in Atlanta on Wednesday, April 7, 2021. US airlines bring back more pilots as they fly are preparing for an expected rebound in travel. Elijah Nouvelage / Bloomberg via Getty Images Of course, plane ticket prices could skyrocket, too, after a year of massive cuts. When asked how cheap plane tickets were obtained, Greenberg replied, “They’ve gotten to the point of stupid. A month ago a one-way trip from Los Angeles to New York, nonstop in American, was $ 90. Today is $ 203. Next week it will be $ 278. And within three weeks, we’ll be back in 2019 “And here’s the interesting thing: in November and December, when people started traveling, even when the CDC recommended not to, where were they going? Were they going to visit granny? Was it a family trip? No, they went wherever they could. They just said, “Get me out of here,” and that’s where they went. And this trend continues now. “” Do people just want to hang out anywhere? “” Pick a place, come on. “And if you’re a city based on tourism, these travelers can’t go fast enough. Las Vegas, Nevada is a place pretty much built on other people’s money. So last spring, when travel dried up, Sin City closed its doors and thousands of people, like artists Anna and Hamish McCann, were left out. Lost their livelihoods, in a way, overnight, and their identities, “Anna said. . Hamish, who performs with the Absinthe show at Caesar’s Palace, got stuck at the house. “I thought it would only be three weeks. I was, like, ‘Oh, we’ll see everyone in three weeks.’ And it was exactly one year and two days later that we reopened. ”Anna is also a professional acrobat at another show. But her show days are on hold right now: she is seven months pregnant. Smith said, “Alright, so my next question about what you did during the pandemic -” “Isn’t that obvious?” Hamish replied. “I watch the plants grow,” Anna said. “And then I later watched something else grow. “Talk about seeing something grow: the brand new addition in West Hall at the Las Vegas Convention Center started long before the pandemic, and has yet to host a single conventioneer.” It’s just fun to be a part of something so spectacular, “said Steve Hill, the head of the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority. Smith asked,” Were you worried this place would be empty for a while? ? ”“ Well, you know, these decisions are made with a 30- or 40- or 50- year old in mind, ”Hill said.“ It was always the right decision to do it. support: in In June, they will organize the first big convention since the closing, and they have reserved 30 more until the end of the year. Like most everyone Smith has spoken to, Billy Vassiliadis of advertising agency R&R Partners is hoping Las Vegas can return. “We have always bounced back dramatically,” he said. “And the reason is that Vegas is a need. It’s a need. People come here, they have to come here. It’s the one place where they completely get lost and turn into whatever they want that is legal. ” “And people need this now, maybe more than ever?” Smith asked. “More than ever, yes.” But if you want to go to Vegas, or somewhere else, you might want to take a reservation soon, says Heather Greenwood Davis: “Right now I’ve heard that booking a trip for Christmas is very difficult to get. something for Christmas. I also know some hotels where you won’t be able to get anything unless you look for 2022. “” What? 2021 is already sold out? “asked Smith. “Sure. The kind of boutique, the posh properties, there are a few that are definitely sold out.” She also says that if living well is really the best revenge, so that might be reason enough for some people to pack their bags and hit the road, with a vengeance. “The ‘journey of revenge’ is the idea that after a year at home, people are going to come back to the pandemic, and actually go out and live their best lives by traveling,” she said. “So it’s kind of like, take this, pandemic, am I going out?” Smith asked. “Absolutely right! So they go as far as they can. They do the things that they always dreamed of. And the idea is that we are going to live our best lives. We saw how We ended up. by losing the opportunity to get out. And so, we won’t let it go again. “For more information: Story produced by John D’Amelio. Publisher: Lauren Barnello. .



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Vaccinated countries wary of reopening air travel in case of relapse | Instant News


Photographer: Wei Leng Tay / Bloomberg Photographer: Wei Leng Tay / Bloomberg Countries that have quickly rolled out coronavirus vaccines are only cautiously reopening for international travel, a sign that it will take time for a hoped-for rebound in air traffic expands. capacity remains stuck at around a tenth of 2019 levels, as the government sets the May 17 target of restarting international travel. Israel, where nearly 55% of the population has been fully vaccinated, is preparing to welcome visitors in groups from May 23 if they can show they have received the vaccine. Policymakers face a difficult balance. A second consecutive summer without major air travel would spell a major setback for an already struggling aviation industry, as well as hotels, shops and restaurants that depend on tourism. Meanwhile, there are fears that premature reopening may help spread new strains of the coronavirus and jeopardize progress towards slowing the spread of the disease. The capacity of still anchored seats remains blocked despite high vaccination levels Source: OAG United States can provide a test case. The country struggles to keep infection rates low, even as a powerful vaccination campaign accelerates. While international travel to most destinations is still prohibited, domestic capacity is increasing, with airlines planning to add flights in the coming weeks. Chile is already in full retreat. The Latin American country obtained its supplies from the Chinese company Sinovac Biotech Ltd. and has fully immunized more than a quarter of its population. After reopening for air travel in November, it has now backed down, closing its borders to most this month in response to a spike in Covid-19 cases. Cautious approach In the UK, around half of the population has received at least one dose. The government, determined to protect the hard-earned success of reducing infection rates, said it would review data early next month on which countries should be greenlisted in its traffic light system, before making a final decision on the month of May. 17 objective of lifting the ban on non-essential travel. Airlines have called for Britain to clear the way for a reopening in the region. Wizz Air Holdings Plc CEO Jozsef Varadi said this week he no longer expected a rebound in European air travel during the peak season this summer, citing travel restrictions and problems with vaccine deployment. Keen to restart tourism, the government announced that it would only reopen in stages from May 23. The groups will start because they are easier to monitor, according to Haaretz. No date has been set to allow individual travelers and health officials will monitor infection rates before making a decision. Neighboring UAE has remained open to air travel for months, while focusing on rapid vaccinations. However, its long-distance hubs in Dubai and Abu Dhabi revolve around 50% of their capacity, depending on large countries in Europe and Asia to lift the borders. Asia has generally relied on social distancing measures to keep infection rates low. Singapore has one of the highest vaccination rates in the region, with around 20% of its population receiving at least one dose. Visits to low-risk countries like New Zealand are permitted under certain circumstances. As part of one program, business travelers stay in a confined area near Changi Airport and hold meetings with locals through a glass wall. Dominant Singapore Airlines Ltd. The government is in talks with several countries to set up air bubbles, including Hong Kong and Australia. Hungary has administered at least a first dose of vaccine to over 30% of its population. Yet daily infection levels remain high and virus mortality is among the highest in Europe. Although foreigners are still barred from entry for personal travel, the Eastern European country has kept its open borders for the transit of goods. With air capacity 92% below 2019 levels, the government looks forward to welcoming football fans in June to the Euro 2021 football tournament. – With help from Marton Eder, Kyunghee Park, Corinne Gretler and Layan Odeh. Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE .



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Airline, travel stocks plummet after US recommends break in J&J Covid vaccine | Instant News



Passengers board an American Airlines flight at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Virginia on April 11, 2021.Andrew Caballero-Reynolds | AFP | The airline and other travel stocks fell on Tuesday after U.S. officials called for a halt in use of Johnson & Johnson’s Covid-19 vaccine due to rare reports of blood clotting. The Food and Drug Administration urged states to stop using the single-dose vaccine after six people in the United States developed a rare blood clotting disorder after receiving the vaccine. J&J said “no clear causal relationship” had been identified between the blood clots and the vaccine and said it was working with regulators to assess the problem. The recommendation comes just as airlines and d other travel agencies have reported improved bookings after the drop in coronavirus cases. peaked earlier this year and more people are being vaccinated. Shares of Delta Air Lines and United Airlines each fell more than 3% in morning trading. American Airlines shares fell about 5%. The Fort Worth-based carrier on Tuesday estimated its first-quarter revenue to be 62% lower than in the first quarter of 2019. The United States said it expected to post a net loss of 2.7 to $ 2.8 billion for the quarter, excluding federal payroll assistance for the sector. The airline said its daily cash consumption during the quarter averaged around $ 27 million per day, including $ 9 million per day in debt and severance, below the $ 30 million mark. dollars that she had previously estimated. , while Marriott and Hilton fell more than 1% each. .



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