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USWNT wins are not about perfection and more about passing important examinations | Instant News


Watch United States of America the women’s national team is an exercise similar to finding flaws in the Sistine Chapel. Most days, there are no imperfections to be found. But on the rare occasions when a flaw is found in the American game, there is discussion to be had about whether it is simple nitpicking or whether the alarm bell should really ring.

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So what makes Sunday 2-0 win above Brazil, who only won the SheBelieves Cup?

In many ways, the US is doing what it usually does. That took up most of the game, and was finally broken through with goals by Christen Press and substitute Megan Rapinoe. The defenses are bent, but still solid. The results are less about perfection and more about efficiency, especially in both penalty areas.

The win was the 15th consecutive win under manager Vlatko Andonovski, who replaced Jill Ellis following the US team’s second consecutive World Cup win in 2019. And it cannot be ignored that the US won against the currently occupying Brazilian side. ranks eighth in the latest FIFA rankings.

Looking beyond those metrics, Brazil certainly has enough talent to threaten the US. There’s been Marta’s longtime attacking lynchpin, even as she has played in a wider role for manager Pia Sundhage. Forwards Debinha and Ludmila were skilled and mobile enough to threaten any team in the world, and do so today. Add in the fact that many US players are still in pre-season mode, and there is every reason to think that Americans are in solid form as this summer Olympics are increasingly in focus.

Dunn explains why USWNT represents the national anthem
– Foudy: What the USWNT needs to do to stay on top

“It’s funny because I think every time I’m in this team, wearing this jersey, I feel like everyone expects us to never take a shot at our goal, or that no team has ever created a chance,” said defender Crystal Dunn. “And I can sit here and say I think we played a great game. I think Brazil is a talented group of players.”

But part of the reason why US women have dominated for so long is precisely because the team is held to high standards, although sometimes expectations border on ridiculous. And there are enough flaws in Sunday’s match to think that there are some issues to watch out for as departure for Tokyo draws near.

The US put on a smoother performance against Brazil than at the tournament opener against Canada. That’s partly because Brazil is bolder in attacking, leading to a more open affair.

But in both games, the US conceded several chances wide open in a transition that didn’t convert. In some situations, the US has helped itself with some clever closing tackles, such as when Dunn slid in the 13th minute to block Ludmila’s shot, or when Julie Ertz’s recovery went right before halftime to spoil the Brazilian counter-attack. Goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher also contributed with Ludmila’s first-half save.

But on another occasion it was a poor finish by an opponent that kept the US goal from being scored. Debinha will still think about the opportunities she wasted in the 82nd minute. It is something the US cannot continue to rely on to move forward.

Right-back Emily Sonnet’s play is also a concern, as she has been second best in a number of duels, although Andonovski defended the player as she spent most of the day against Marta.

“Several times I thought he could do a better job,” he said. “But overall he played against one of the best players in the world right now, and he was able to move up front, denying some of the passes that came in. He could get the ball a few times so it’s a good overall performance.

To Andonovski’s credit, the transition chances seen in the first half remained largely under control after halftime thanks to some tactical adjustments. This included dropping Ertz a little deeper to limit space for Debinha and Ludmila, as well as providing added protection for center-backs Abby Dahlkemper and Becky Sauerbrunn. The US is also doing a better job of pressing the ball in midfield and slowing down Brazil’s efforts to play in transition.

“We know that if we give them a lot of space as a unit they will expose it, and I think in the first half, we didn’t do a pretty good job closing down the space,” said Andonovski. “After we adjusted the structure a little bit, I think we did a wonderful job maintaining their transition.”

However it is worth mentioning that in the previous match against Canada some transition opportunities were also conceded. There’s certainly no time to panic when it comes to US defense, but there are reasons to be wary of how teams appear to be exploiting weaknesses.

There seems to be a bit more patience attached to the team’s attack, with Lindsay Horan’s two assists in the spotlight, along with Rapinoe’s “Rock the Baby” celebration, an ode to team-mates Ali Krieger and Ashlyn Harris adopting a baby last week. Horan’s appearance is a reminder that Andonovski has options behind injured Sam Mewis. The press shows their quality too with well-taken goals.

The return of Alex Morgan is also a plus, considering it is his first start in the national team since giving birth last year. He did 71 minutes of active shifts.

All that said, the US team needs to be tested in this tournament, and that’s what for Andonovski has been the main point of this game so far.

“We want to play our best,” he said. “We want to play against a different type of opponent, an opponent who will present a different challenge, for a reason. So we can go back into the room now, go back to the office and learn, why they can get 10 shots on goal? What can we do? do differently? And we hope we can be better than him. “

Regarding perfection, the US hopes it happens later this summer.

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Why Brazilian club Corinthians continues to be such a big fan of Taylor Swift | Instant News


Sunday is a fairy tale for fans of Brazilian club Corinthians.

The last few years have not been easy for a giant club, perhaps the second most popular in the country. In 2012, they finally won the Copa Libertadores, the South American Champions League, and ended the year with a beat Chelsea and won the Club World Cup. A period of supremacy seemed guaranteed.

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This is a newly established club in Brazil, counting on the fanatical support of former president Luiz Inacio Lula de Saliva. And another dream will come true soon. Corinthians play at the Pacaembu stadium – well located near the heart of Sao Paulo, but owned by the city government and often shared with Sao Paulo, Palmeiras and Santos. For decades, plans had been foiled for Corinthians to get their own home, but thanks to the 2014 World Cup, the wait has ended. New land was built in Itaquera, to the east of the city, and once Brazil ’14 is over, it will belong to Corinthians. The good times will roll in soon.

And there are good times. Corinthians won the Brazilian Championship in real style in 2015 – a victory that catapulted coach Tite into the job of the Brazilian national team – and repeated the feat in a more pragmatic manner two years later. They also won the local Sao Paulo title three years in a row between 2017-2019.

But their ‘East Side Story’ had a problem. Having your own stadium is great. Paying for it, however, has been a tremendous headache. It proved to drain club finances to such an extent that a mighty club was forced into a low-budget organization, with obvious consequences on the pitch.

A few years ago, the idea of ​​Corinthians in the middle of the league table would have been seen as a disaster. However, at this moment, it even felt like a relief. The club have been looking anxiously over their shoulder in the relegation zone of late.

Even worse, historic rivals Palmeiras have found a much better way to handle the transition to a new (in this case rebuilt) stadium. And supported by rich sponsors, they have been able to put together a deep squad and challenge for the top trophy. They were champions of Brazil in 2018, and are set to advance to the semi-finals of the Copa Libertadores for the second time in three years.

If there is one consolation for Corinthians fans, it is the problem of their other city rivals, Sao Paulo. Long held as an example of a well-run club, Sao Paulo has recently been in turmoil. Their only title in more than a decade was the Copa Sudamericana (South America’s Europa League equivalent) in 2012. So Corinthians fans can find comfort in the way Sao Paulo amasses frustration and humiliation.

But in recent months, with brave coach Fernando Diniz finally finding the right balance for his side, Sao Paulo has soared to the top of the league standings. They go to the new Corinthians stadium with a 17-game unbeaten run in the league that puts them seven points clear of their closest challengers.

But Corinthians found hope in an unexpected quarter. Some fans with time on their hands and despair in their hearts have stumbled upon the game of stats. In Taylor Swift’s 15 year musical career, Corinthians was unbeatable in the game before and after every album she released. And on the Friday before the match, the country singer released her ninth album ‘Evermore’ – a name that might even refer to the effectiveness of the spell she had clearly placed on Corinthians.

Because it worked again. Sao Paulo was very slow, while Corinthians were fearless, and deserved their 1-0 win.

Corinthians supporters will be anxiously awaiting Swift’s next release. But unless the pop star starts making a new album every week, Corinthians will need to find other sources of inspiration to change their fortunes.

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Bayern v Dortmund in the DFL-Supercup have a chance to judge Germany’s top two well after a bad weekend | Instant News


With 2020 being an unlikely year due to the pandemic, it’s no surprise that Wednesday’s DFL-Supercup match watch LIVE on ESPN +, 2.30p ET (US only) – german giant, Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund, bringing dynamism and nuance different from the usual. While high-profile matches since first coming under the umbrella of the DFL (German Football League) in 2010 have catered for appetites for the upcoming Bundesliga season, this year given the busy calendar, it has landed midweek the 2nd round into the campaign. wild league.

LIVE Streaming: DFL Super Cup, Bayern vs. Dortmund, Weds. 30/9, 2.30p ET

Bayern and Dortmund, in that order, have represented Germany’s gold standard in recent years, but neither side shone in last weekend’s incredible away defeat. Hoffenheim and Augsburg show that with smart tactics properly executed, the league’s “big two” can be beaten.

Hoffenheim, the first team to overcome Champion record in any competition since 7 December 2019, ending Bayern’s 32 match unbeaten run in all competitions, now coached by Sebastian Hoeness. Yes, Hoeness is from the same parish as the rarely silent honorary president of Bavaria, Uli. In fact, his nephew. I have to admit, I doubt I will ever contemplate Hoeness beating Bayern!

Why did Bayern slump so spectacularly in Sinsheim? As well as the fatigue factor stemming from their grueling 120 minutes against Sevilla in the UEFA Super Cup in Budapest earlier that week, both Hoffenheim and Hoeness came in preparations for Bayern’s usual high-pressure approach and largely overturned it by playing directly over the press. . There are 31 long passes from the goalkeeper Oliver Baumann; in one case, it resulted in a goal five touches later.

Aware of Bayern’s high rank, Hoffenheim used a fast and sharp ball into the wobbly belly of the rearguard. It helps, of course, to have an authoritative attacker Andrej Kramaric caused havoc, and it’s no surprise that Bayern legend Lothar Matthäus, now a TV analyst, recommended that his former club sign the agile Croatia international.

In wide-open play, Hoffenheim created more chances than European club champions with even less possession, putting eight of their 17 attempts on target. Hoeness also ensured his team, anchored by five flexible defenders without the ball, maintained discipline, with Diadie Samassékou’s record signing providing a master class on how to make an impact in a midfield area teeming with top class opponents.

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– Hamilton, Uersfeld: Why the US’s top prospects chose the German Bundesliga

For Hansi Flick, it was a painful experience against a team he served as coach and sporting director in the past; You rarely see a Bayern team with so many players dropping out of their game at the same time.

At right back, World Cup winner Benjamin Pavard outing has been shaken since joining from Stuttgart. David Alaba and Jerome Boateng exuded a hint of confidence in the middle, while over a wide area, Serge Gnabry and Leroy Sane away from the stars on the opening night of the 8-0 show against Schalke. Robert Lewandowski, serving as the Bundesliga successor for the first time in two years, is well managed Stefan Posch and Kevin Vogt after coming Joshua Zirkzee in the 58th minute.

The day before, Dortmund had suffered a 2-0 defeat in Augsburg against a team that had more limited ability and ambition than Hoffenheim, but who were stuck relentlessly on their plans around set pieces and occasional sizzling counter-attacks. As expected, Dortmund had a lot of possession (73%), but mostly made the weather worse with an overly slow and tiring rhythm from midfield. This allows the Augsburg defenders in particular Jeffrey Gouweleeuw and Felix Uduokhai, to manage to hold back the fluids, but four very young Dortmund forwards Jude Bellingham, Gio Reyna, Jadon Sancho and Erling Haaland.

Dortmund coach Lucien Favre has to weigh balance in attack and whether fielding a pair of 17 and 20 year olds, no matter how talented, is the right mix against stubborn opponents, backed by 6,000 fans who are vocally excited to get a taste of football again. Dortmund kids with their movies and tricks attract attention and are often effective, but maybe not all at once Marco Reus and Julian Brandt both are available.

At the event, to add to the feeling of emptiness in the Dortmund camp after the weekend, the former Schalke man became the downfall of Borussia Dortmund. Free kick specialist Daniel Caligiuri, 32 years young, set up Uduokhai’s header for the opener before continuing Florian Niederlechnerthreaded pass for the second goal.

Dortmund at their core are the better team at break-speed. In that sense, the Super Cup may be a more exciting task for many in black and gold than Saturday’s trip to Augsburg. Favre and his coaching staff should learn a little about how to spoil Bayern by watching Hoffenheim, as the Kraichgau club from Sevilla learned. Meanwhile, Bayern are expected to have carried out a thorough analysis of their Hoffenheim beating and Flick admitted at his press conference Tuesday that “some of the guidelines in our game were not well implemented.”

What Bayern tend to implement most efficiently is their match plans at home against their main German rivals. As evidence, there are no more wins by a difference of 4-0, 5-0 and 6-0 in the team’s last 3 meetings at the Allianz Arena. Sane is definitely out for Bayern, with a capsular injury to the right knee, and will last until the international break, while Alaba is also a doubt. No matter what happens against BVB, it is reasonable to question whether Bayern’s squad as a whole is deep enough to meet the demands that have been unprecedented this season. Moving activities must be anticipated in advance The modified summer window closes on October 5.

Dortmund might be able to welcome back Lukas Piszczek and Nico Schulz after returning recently from injury Raphael Guerreiro. However Jadon Sancho and Roman Bürki have not traveled due to respiratory infections.

The COVID-19 situation in Munich means no fans can attend the DFL-Supercup – the infection rate per 10,000 people was 37.58, slightly above the “acceptable” level of 35 over the past seven days – but the game will be of immense interest. German and around the world. “Prestige duels at eye level“is the German way of putting it -” the prestigious duel of its equals. “But sometimes, one club can be more equal than another! Interesting watches await as the endless assessments of Germany’s top two continue.

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How I fell in love with football and German culture | Instant News


“What’s with you and German? “This is a question I get quite often. As a Scotsman whose broadcast travels have taken me around the world since I first used the microphone professionally in 1986, no country has held onto me like the land of the bratwurst, BMW, Beckenbauer and of course, Bayern Munich.

The seed was planted in 1974, when West Germany hosted the World Cup on Cold War days, and the country’s divisions add intrigue and mystery to a curious 7-year-old football fanatic. While this is an immersion in the greatest sporting tournament on the planet, it raises interest in everything Germany, especially after the DDR national team from the East beat their more glamorous Western counterparts in a one-time match.

If you look on the map, you’ll see how close the north coast of Germany is to my hometown, Aberdeen; indeed, the North Sea was one of Europe’s earliest highways.

Geographically we are close, but linguistically far away, or so I thought. When I started learning German in primary school a few years later, I realized that it was natural for me. Some of the hoarse voices are no different from the Doric dialect of my parents and ancestors which is still spoken in fishing and farming communities in Northeast Scotland. As a radio enthusiast, I find that because of our coastal location we often receive radio signals from Hamburg at night. So, NDR (North German Broadcasting) came into my life, in many ways changed it forever.

It becomes a daily ritual. Doing homework with the NDR in the background means a mix of news, politics, music – I can tell you a lot about German pop from the 1970s and 80s – and, when there are games, football! That means a regular portion of the Bundesliga. Magical German word makers such as Jochen Hageleit and Gerd Rubenbauer paint vivid pictures with their words. As my language comprehension skills improved, I was taken into the secret and interesting world of Germany that I knew I wanted to follow.

Traveling abroad was a luxury that some families in the early 1980s could consider, but my parents spoiled me in 1982 by taking us on vacations, by car, and then a ferry, to Hamburg. It’s funny what you remember about your first visit to a new country; my memory is how wide the streets were compared to the houses, the bicycle paths and the bells that kept ringing from cyclists as we involuntarily stormed their spaces; smells of bratwurst and mustard. Plus there’s an impromptu visit to the Volksparkstadion, the home of Hamburger SV, which will be crowned European club champions the following year.

It was summer, and sadly there were no matches to go to, but my father and I just walked inside the empty stadium and saw the wide view, the wide and wide terraces. I pictured the burly Horst Hrubesch diving to head in Manni Kaltz’s signature cross.

In the 80s, my German teacher at Hazlehead Academy, Bryan Steel, had a huge impact, sensing he had a student in me who valued the subject matter. Bryan has fellow teachers in the small community of Obersuhl, which crosses the border of West and East Germany. I first went there as part of an organized school trip, but then in 1985, between school and university, funded my trip by working as a postman in Aberdeen for the first part of the summer. Living with Bryan’s colleague, Erich, and helping out at a local school, teaching me about living in a small German town, and given his proximity to East German border guards, with their watchtowers and binoculars, I still have to this day “dead Grenze im Kopf “(” border on my head “).

Although unable to travel to DDR at the time, I spent a weekend on a train in West Germany. It was late August, at the start of the football season, and spoiled myself with as many matches as possible, starting with the closest second tier team, Hessen Kassel, and then Frankfurt, with a lovely forest walk to the stadium. Borussia Dortmund, Schalke, Bochum and my personal favorite, Cologne, will follow soon. I was never satisfied with the “Spieltag” (“matchday”) routine: traveling from the train station to the bratwurst booth, picking up local newspapers, taking public transportation to matches, interacting with fans on the street, standing and admiring the stadium from outside. It was a routine I maintained while on duty in Germany, before the pandemic stopped it.

Until the last decade or so, my commentary work has rarely involved this country of football that I love so much, despite the countless travels as a fan. Yes, there were a few games to cover in Germany in my years at BBC Scotland, but all from a Scottish club point of view. I’m always happy, of course, when later as the main Champions League commentator on ESPN it’s the job to cover any German team. I feel fluent in the language and with the advent of the internet, starting most of the day watching German news improve my skills. I continue to listen diligently to the Bundesliga and other German content on the NDR, WDR and various other stations just as part of getting up every day.

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In 2009, I was again one of ESPN’s UK commentators. Over the years, I have felt on social media that those who really like German football seem to like the same microphone. I don’t just comment on player to player, but try to share my knowledge and passion.

played

1:27

ESPN FC’s Archie Rhind-Tutt explores the downfall of two former Bundesliga giants.

It wasn’t long after that DFL, which runs the top two divisions in Germany, started expanding their world feed comments. Long story short, I started working for them when other commitments allowed. It feels like a wedding made in heaven, the work of true love with an amazing team of producers and commentators based in my Germany home away from home, Cologne. In recent years, I have been fortunate enough to be on site to comment on the many big games for the DFL from Dortmund vs Bayern, to Revierderby (Dortmund vs. Schalke), to Union Berlin (that East German connection again) earned promotion to the Bundesliga for the first time.

Now everything is full circle with ESPN, the broadcast center for most of my career. When my colleague Kay Murray ahead of Bayern-Schalke’s opener this season introduces me as “the voice of our coverage and the voice of the Bundesliga to many,” it means a lot. Thanks, Kay.

I will comment on all the Bundesliga matches broadcast on ESPN’s linear TV network in the US, pop up to talk about the league on ESPN FC, and write a weekly column in this space dedicated to German football. The 7 year old at Aberdeen had no idea what would happen at the 1974 World Cup.

.



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How I fell in love with football and German culture | Instant News


“What’s with you and German? “This is a question I get quite often. As a Scotsman whose broadcast travels have taken me around the world since I first used the microphone professionally in 1986, no country has held onto me like the land of the bratwurst, BMW, Beckenbauer and of course, Bayern Munich.

The seed was planted in 1974, when West Germany hosted the World Cup on Cold War days, and the country’s divisions add intrigue and mystery to a curious 7-year-old football fanatic. While this is an immersion in the greatest sporting tournament on the planet, it raises interest in everything Germany, especially after the DDR national team from the East beat their more glamorous Western counterparts in a one-time match.

If you look on the map, you’ll see how close the north coast of Germany is to my hometown, Aberdeen; indeed, the North Sea was one of Europe’s earliest highways.

Geographically we are close, but linguistically far away, or so I thought. When I started learning German in primary school a few years later, I realized that it was natural for me. Some of the hoarse voices are no different from the Doric dialect of my parents and ancestors which is still spoken in fishing and farming communities in Northeast Scotland. As a radio enthusiast, I find that because of our coastal location we often receive radio signals from Hamburg at night. So, NDR (North German Broadcasting) came into my life, in many ways changed it forever.

It becomes a daily ritual. Doing homework with the NDR in the background means a mix of news, politics, music – I can tell you a lot about German pop from the 1970s and 80s – and, when there are games, football! That means a regular portion of the Bundesliga. Magical German word makers such as Jochen Hageleit and Gerd Rubenbauer paint vivid pictures with their words. As my language comprehension skills improved, I was taken into the secret and interesting world of Germany that I knew I wanted to follow.

Traveling abroad was a luxury that some families in the early 1980s could consider, but my parents spoiled me in 1982 by taking us on vacations, by car, and then a ferry, to Hamburg. It’s funny what you remember about your first visit to a new country; my memory is how wide the streets were compared to the houses, the bicycle paths and the bells that kept ringing from cyclists as we involuntarily stormed their spaces; smells of bratwurst and mustard. Plus there’s an impromptu visit to the Volksparkstadion, the home of Hamburger SV, which will be crowned European club champions the following year.

It was summer, and sadly there were no matches to go to, but my father and I just walked inside the empty stadium and saw the wide view, the wide and wide terraces. I pictured the burly Horst Hrubesch diving to head in Manni Kaltz’s signature cross.

In the 80s, my German teacher at Hazlehead Academy, Bryan Steel, had a huge impact, sensing he had a student in me who valued the subject matter. Bryan has fellow teachers in the small community of Obersuhl, which crosses the border of West and East Germany. I first went there as part of an organized school trip, but then in 1985, between school and university, funded my trip by working as a postman in Aberdeen for the first part of the summer. Living with Bryan’s colleague, Erich, and helping out at a local school, teaching me about living in a small German town, and given his proximity to East German border guards, with their watchtowers and binoculars, I still have to this day “dead Grenze im Kopf “(” border on my head “).

Although unable to travel to DDR at the time, I spent a weekend on a train in West Germany. It was late August, at the start of the football season, and spoiled myself with as many matches as possible, starting with the closest second tier team, Hessen Kassel, and then Frankfurt, with a lovely forest walk to the stadium. Borussia Dortmund, Schalke, Bochum and my personal favorite, Cologne, will follow soon. I was never satisfied with the “Spieltag” (“matchday”) routine: traveling from the train station to the bratwurst booth, picking up local newspapers, taking public transportation to matches, interacting with fans on the street, standing and admiring the stadium from outside. It was a routine I maintained while on duty in Germany, before the pandemic stopped it.

Until the last decade or so, my commentary work has rarely involved this country of football that I love so much, despite the countless travels as a fan. Yes, there were a few games to cover in Germany in my years at BBC Scotland, but all from a Scottish club point of view. I’m always happy, of course, when later as the main Champions League commentator on ESPN it’s the job to cover any German team. I feel fluent in the language and with the advent of the internet, starting most of the day watching German news improve my skills. I continue to listen diligently to the Bundesliga and other German content on the NDR, WDR and various other stations just as part of getting up every day.

Stream ESPN FC Daily on ESPN + (US only)
ESPN + audience guide: Bundesliga, Serie A, MLS, FA Cup and more

In 2009, I was again one of ESPN’s UK commentators. Over the years, I have felt on social media that those who really like German football seem to like the same microphone. I don’t just comment on player to player, but try to share my knowledge and passion.

played

1:27

ESPN FC’s Archie Rhind-Tutt explores the downfall of two former Bundesliga giants.

It wasn’t long after that DFL, which runs the top two divisions in Germany, started expanding their world feed comments. Long story short, I started working for them when other commitments allowed. It feels like a wedding made in heaven, the work of true love with an amazing team of producers and commentators based in my Germany home away from home, Cologne. In recent years, I have been fortunate enough to be on site to comment on the many big games for the DFL from Dortmund vs Bayern, to Revierderby (Dortmund vs. Schalke), to Union Berlin (that East German connection again) earned promotion to the Bundesliga for the first time.

Now everything is full circle with ESPN, the broadcast center for most of my career. When my colleague Kay Murray ahead of Bayern-Schalke’s opener this season introduces me as “the voice of our coverage and the voice of the Bundesliga to many,” it means a lot. Thanks, Kay.

I will comment on all the Bundesliga matches broadcast on ESPN’s linear TV network in the US, pop up to talk about the league on ESPN FC, and write a weekly column in this space dedicated to German football. The 7 year old at Aberdeen had no idea what would happen at the 1974 World Cup.

.



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