Tag Archives: amazing

America’s Cup 2021: New Zealand team emotions overflowing after the comeback in race 8 | Instant News


The New Zealand team finally let their emotions run over after making a stunning comeback to win Race 8 of the America’s Cup Match. And two more wins on Tuesday will see them defend Auld Mug.

After Team NZ failed midway through the second half following an error by helmsman Peter Burling, Luna Rossa had a huge lead and looked like the inevitable winner of the race.

But the spin came in the third leg when it was Luna Rossa’s turn to shed their screen in bright and inconsistent conditions, allowing the Kiwis to not only catch up but slide to win by nearly four minutes.

The rollercoaster race ends with Team NZ members aboard the Te Rehutai who can be heard giving off a relieved – and colorful – celebration as they cross the finish line.

“I’m very happy with it. F ***,” a crew member said on the broadcast.

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American yacht and sailing commentator Ken Read says it’s an emotion we’ve never seen so far from Team NZ.

“That’s the emotion that comes out of the Kiwi,” Read said in the official Copa America broadcast. “It’s an emotion I’ve never seen before from a Kiwi.”

“You think the fans are relieved? What about the crew out there,” added fellow commentator Stephen McIvor.

After the race, Team NZ’s foil controller, Blair Tuke, was also excited by the “unrealistic resistance”.

“Yeah, wow what a race,” said Tuke. “Definitely one to defend against. It was a very unreal resistance from the people over there.

The New Zealand team waves to family and supporters after winning both races on the fifth day of the Copa America.  Photos / Photosport
The New Zealand team waves to family and supporters after winning both races on the fifth day of the Copa America. Photos / Photosport

Obviously we made a pretty costly mistake spinning right behind them on the first downwind and out of foil but we got them back pretty quickly, and then set sail with a great race from there.

“They made a mistake on one of their top-scoring tacks … and we never looked back.”

When asked if he had sailed in such a race before, Tuke said: “Maybe not with a lot of people watching. It’s not real.

“Another big attendance even on a weekday here,” he added. Obviously we finished in the top position so we were right by the crowd below Motuihe. It was a few races and we were in the wrong position there in real low end conditions, which made it even more difficult.

All boys go there till the end. When you have a race where you do a lot of takeoffs like that and the big onscreen control changes, it’s tough for boys. So much effort by the young men.

The NZ team also beat the previous race by a convincing margin, showing a significant difference in speed and finishing in what was the first lead change from regatting so far.

The defenders lead the match 5-3 in the first series through seven. Race 9 will take place at 4:15 p.m. today.

Towards a Cup race?

• Give yourself plenty of time and think about taking the ferry, train, or bus to watch the Cup.

• Make sure your AT HOP card is in your pocket. It’s the best way to ride.

• Don’t forget to scan the QR code with the NZ COVID Tracer app when taking public transportation and entering America’s Cup Village.

• For more ways to enjoy race day, visit at.govt.nz/americascup.

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New Zealand’s best beaches: hidden gems | Instant News


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Whale’s Bay, Tutukaka. Photo / Melinda Legg

The results are in! Today, our finalists are announced: 13 stunning Kiwi beaches chosen by you and the Travel team. Click here to see the result, and read about our 10 most popular beaches, and our three favorite wild cards.

But every New Zealander knows that some of our best stretches of sand are the hard to reach, the lesser known and the hidden gems.

Here are some of our favorite entries from readers who favored Aotearoa’s calmer coastline.

Don’t miss your chance to be crowned New Zealand’s Best Beach 2021. Please visit nzherald.co.nz/bestbeach to vote for your favorite from our finalists.

Pukehina Beach, Bay of Plenty

Pukehina Beach is the “hidden gem” of the Eastern Bay of Plenty coast. Outside of peak season, this small town of 200 people is a tightly knit community of fishermen and women, retirees and tangata whenua connected to the great Arawa waka. Beautiful beaches and beaches remind us of the old days. Many homes have been passed down from generation to generation, converted with just a touch of paint, perhaps a new deck. The cousins ​​slept all night in a bed that also housed longboards, surfcasters and kayaks. Aunts can be seen gathering kaimoana in the estuary, nannas and pop their fur babies for walks along the beach and meeting the local uncle – Hippi Pippi. From stunning sunsets to ever-changing coastal landscapes and a micro-climate of its own, Pukehina Beach with its soft white sand and turquoise waters is a truly unique Aotearoa beach experience.

Amber Stevens

Pukehina, Bay of Plenty.  Photo / Amber Stevens
Pukehina, Bay of Plenty. Photo / Amber Stevens

New Chums Beach, Coromandel Peninsula

Over the last 20+ years I’ve traveled with family and then friends, lots of picnics, lots of beach days, nights out, and some beach cricket games. The fact that you can’t drive out there weed out the crowd, and walking on it itself is spectacular! This is truly a magical part of NZ

Natalie Lions

New Friend, Coromandel.  Photo / Natalie Lions
New Friend, Coromandel. Photo / Natalie Lions

Whale Bay Beach, Tutukaka Beach, Northland

A 10-minute walk along the cliff-side gives you stunning views of the coves around Whale Bay. Once you go down the trail the beach itself has clear blue water (almost like the Maldives). Beautiful trees perfect for hammocks and small swings provide seclusion and shade, and small rock pools on either side for exploration. Among the famous beaches but with warmer water, it is a hidden gem. It is a must.

Melinda Legg

Whale's Bay, Tutukaka.  Photo / Melinda Legg
Whale’s Bay, Tutukaka. Photo / Melinda Legg

Kariaotahi Beach, South Auckland

I’ve been lifeguard for this beach for eight seasons now and been a part of junior surfing since I was 7 years old (now 21). From the experiences I have had from this beach during my time as part of this wonderful community and nature, I can safely say that it is by far the best beach in Auckland and the country.

Taylor Harvey

Karioitahi Beach, South Auckland.  Photo / Taylor Harvey
Karioitahi Beach, South Auckland. Photo / Taylor Harvey

Amodeo Bay, Coromandel

Our special slice of heaven. We first came here on our honeymoon nearly 16 years ago and have never stopped returning. It is rugged and far enough away to be quiet, so not overcrowded, and has the most amazing sunsets, and the best fishing spots are not far from the coast. This is truly a Kiwi experience. There is a river flowed by the ocean where there are many pet eels that you can feed and pat with your hands. It is surrounded by native bush and on quiet nights you can hear kiwis.

Karen Bates

Amodeo Bay, Coromandel.  Photo / Karen Bates
Amodeo Bay, Coromandel. Photo / Karen Bates

Taupō Bay, Far North

It’s special for its size, location, stunning views and chill feel. It epitomizes everything we look for on a classic Kiwi beach – unobtrusive, never overcrowded, part of a magical coastline, just a simple beach has it all. We love it.

Todd Male

Bethells / Te Henga Beach

I nominated for the best beach in west Auckland, Bethells Beach / Te Henga. It is one of the calmest, rugged beaches that are beautifully reflected on those sunny days. Always have awesome sunsets, places to swim / surf / fish, walk along cliffs, on the dunes, along the beach, special wildlife, and people from all different walks of life. You also have access to Lake Wainamu which is a short walk from the beach and is spectacular with its massive sand dunes reflecting off the lake. This cafe serves unbeatable post beach food.

Luke Campbell

Jackson Bay, West Coast

On a beautiful sunny day, you can enjoy a beautiful wild beach and feel like you are the only person in the world – sunbathing, looking for rare pebbles on the beach, at night building a driftwood fire. Just say it! On a day with wild weather, it’s like you’re in another world – foggy, rocky and desolate. One of the best spots on the NZ coastline so far.

Felicity Lynchard

Thorne Bay Beach, North Coast

Beautiful beach at Waitematā Harbor. Golden sand, shade of trees along the coast, rock pools with fresh water flowing between the rocks from Lake Pupuke. Overlooking Rangitoto and north to Whangaparāoa. Coupled with steep rises on the water’s edge for swimming near shore and avoiding rowing too far to reach deep water. Accessible only by walking around the waterfront or via footpaths from Minhaha Street – no car access so it feels more remote and secluded, yet you are less than 10 km to downtown Auckland.

Kim Leuila

For more New Zealand travel ideas and inspiration, visit newzealand.com

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GO NZ: Te Araroa changed my life walking across New Zealand | Instant News


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Laura Waters, pictured at Masons Hut, the last shack on the South Island on the Te Araroa Trail. Photo / Laura Waters

My eyes cloud as I think about the time I walked from Cape Reinga to Bluff. Here it is again, my friends must be thinking as I talk about the joys, tribulations, and amazing sights encountered during a 3000 km journey through this country. As far as a once-in-a-lifetime trip, setting foot in Te Araroa has been transformative, and its long-term effects on my life have only made it even more memorable. With the challenges of today’s world, fleeing into the wild is again a tantalizing choice.

Long-distance lines are gaining popularity around the world and in 2011 New Zealand launched its own line, a linear route connecting many pre-existing lines with several new links. In the north it winds from the west coast to the east and back again, via secluded beaches, mossy forest, the volcanic desert of Tongariro National Park, and knife-tipped ridges across the Tararua Mountains. To the south, a more direct route up and along the dramatic Southern Alps is required. About once a week, sometimes more often, the walkway intersects the city where hot showers and general stores offer the opportunity to refresh and recharge.

The Te Araroa Trail takes hikers across the country, from remote beaches in the North, to country tracks in the South.  Photo / Laura Waters
The Te Araroa Trail takes hikers across the country, from remote beaches in the North, to country tracks in the South. Photo / Laura Waters

When I left in 2013, Te Araroa was an unknown quantity, a trail that few people have managed to complete. Even though I had walked a dozen or more days under my belt, none were even more than 65 km so it was an experiment with fire on body and mind. I need it. After the closure of toxic relationships and the stress of city life, my world has been taken over by crippling anxiety and depression, the symptoms miraculously and magically disappearing within weeks of being immersed in the peace and simplicity of nature.

Then I fixed a problem I wasn’t even aware of. Walking the trails, I face countless challenges: steep, open mountains, sudden blizzards, a number of unobstructed river crossings, dubious trail signs, shoulder dislocations and, not least, loss of hiking companions. I got injured on the second day. But in overcoming this challenge I found a hitherto untapped inner intellect and courage. I learned to adapt to the environment, listen to my heart’s content and overcome fear. I found I was able to do more than I realized and I noticed how little you need to be happy – food, shelter, and a bag of belongings is enough. It is clear that life can be fun if you simplify it and eliminate the “noise.” The insights gained during those five months changed my life forever, leading to a career change and a substantial re-establishment of personal beliefs and worldviews.

Upper Travers Hut in Nelson Lakes National Park, one of the DoC huts on the Te Araroa trail.  Photo / Laura Waters
Upper Travers Hut in Nelson Lakes National Park, one of the DoC huts on the Te Araroa trail. Photo / Laura Waters

Taking the entire route will give you an experience like no other, but if you can’t spare the time or energy to wade the 3000 km, consider climbing the section, taking bite-sized stages over a long period of time. Alternatively, choose an interesting part of the cherry. The stretch from St Arnaud to Boyle Village, across from Nelson’s Lake National Park on the South Island, really evokes a few tears from me as I see its beautiful snow-capped mountains, fast-flowing rivers and vast boulder fields.

A solitary prostitute descending towards Lake Tekapo on the Te Araroa Line.  Photo / Laura Waters
A solitary prostitute descending towards Lake Tekapo on the Te Araroa Line. Photo / Laura Waters

If you’re curious to know what it’s like to have the beach all to yourself for four days, the first 100 kilometers south of Cape Reinga follows the secluded golden trail of Ninety Mile Beach. Mount Pirongia, in Waikato, marks the first true mountain range for hikers to the south and a two-day portion of its steep green mossy cliffs. Real delights are lesser-known finds such as the stunning jungle on North Island Hakarimata Road or Telford Tops on the Takitimu Trail to the south. The four-day Mavora Walkway, south of Queenstown, is also renowned for its lakes, mountains, beech forest and amazing sense of isolation.

The highlight of the trail – which incidentally doesn’t involve walking – is the 200 kilometers paddling up the Whanganui River. Kayaks and canoes can be rented at Taumarunui for a six-day paddle out to sea in Whanganui. About 200 rapids are scattered along the route, light enough for beginners to traverse yet foamy enough to get their heart racing. In some places, the river carves its way through steep-sided canyon walls dotted with ferns and gushing waterfalls, and campsites overlooking snaking water are some of the most beautiful places I have ever come across.

The Te Araroa Trail passes through the misty and misty forests of the Tararua Mountains.  Photo / Laura Waters
The Te Araroa Trail passes through the misty and misty forests of the Tararua Mountains. Photo / Laura Waters

Most of the nights on the North Island are spent in tents, but on the South Island, hikers can make use of many DoC huts on their way, especially when the weather turns challenging. Buying an inland cottage entry ticket will give you access to all the huts on the trail and while some have all the sophistication and comfort of a garden shed, others are double-layered masterpieces with cozy wood-burning stoves and five-star views.

I’m not going to cover it with sugar, walk all day, every day, need a little energy. I made it past the 10kg Whittakers in the five months it took me to complete the trail and I’m still losing weight (ah, those were the days). Te Araroa is also not for the faint of heart. The terrain is quite challenging at times and can be exposed to bad weather, but nothing compares to the feeling of being completely connected to the mainland as you peer through your flying tent as the moon rises over the remote Ahuriri River Valley. Or the shadow of a killer whale’s dorsal fin slicing through the surface of Queen Charlotte Sound as you follow the ridge trail above. Or a softer owl chirp in the dark northern forest night. Moments like magic make the trouble worth it.

Laura Waters is the author of Bewildered’s memoir, about her 3,000km hike along New Zealand.

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ROAD WAY
The Te Araroa Trail stretches 3000km from Cape Reinga to Bluff and takes between 4-6 months to complete. Topographic maps, track records and further information can be downloaded from teararoa.org.nz

For more New Zealand travel ideas and inspiration, visit newzealand.com

This story was first published in the New Zealand Herald Travel on October 1

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The missing woman at Manukau Auckland | Instant News


Elizabeth Zhong aka Ying Zhong of Sunnyhills has not been seen since Friday afternoon. Photo / Provided

An Auckland businesswoman with several company directorships has disappeared in the Manukau area.

Police said Elizabeth (Ying) Zhong, 55, was reported missing from her Sunnyhills home this morning and was last seen on Friday afternoon.

Several police cars were outside his Auckland home on Saturday night.

“Police and Elizabeth’s family are concerned about her welfare and want to hear from anyone who may have seen her, or who knows where she is,” police said.

“He is about 160cm tall and slender in stature, and is probably a walk in the eastern area of ​​Manukau County.

“Anyone who can help the police find Elizabeth is required to call the number 105 citation file 201128/1909.”

Zhong, who has experienced health problems recently, is the sole owner and director of two winemaking companies who are now recipients – Kennedy Point Vineyard on Waiheke Island and Carrick’s wine in Central Otago.

He is also the sole owner and director of the film production company Digital Post Ltd, Digipost Entertainment and related companies.

Digipost offers animation and computer graphics, film post-production, sound mixing and visual effects.

Credits that have been engaged by the company include Mosely, Ash versus Evil Dad, Mt Zion, Spartacus, Love Birds, and 30 Days of Night.

Its website states: “Digipost is New Zealand’s most experienced visual effects and post production company dedicated to realizing the creative endeavors of our clients, providing the highest quality service to the film, advertising and television industries.”

In 2018, Variety reported that Zhong and Digipost were part of a “three-way development and finance deal” with Tim White’s Southern Light Films and Super Entertainment for a live-action fantasy film CGI Shelved worth up to $ 56 million.

Variety reports the film is about “two lazy robots restless about being replaced by humans.” The film, which involves NZ-born Shrek director Andrew Adamson, will be a New Zealand-China co-production.

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