Tag Archives: Antitrust Regulations

QUOTE BOX-Reaction to Facebook agreeing to a concession deal with Australia on a media bill | Instant News


(Update with comments)

CANBERRA, February 23 (Reuters) – Facebook said on Tuesday it would restore its Australian news page after negotiating changes with the government to a proposed law that forces tech giants to pay for media content displayed on their platforms.

Following are comments from Facebook, Australia and analysts:

JOSH FRYDENBERG, AUSTRALIAN ANNOUNCEMENT

“There is no doubt that Australia has become a proxy battle for the world. I am sure there are many other countries that are looking at what is happening in Australia.

“Facebook and Google are not hiding the fact that they know that the eyes of the world are on Australia, and that’s why they’re trying to come up with a code here that works.”

CAMPBELL BROWN, VICE FACEBOOK PRESIDENT GLOBAL NEWS PARTNERSHIP

“We have reached an agreement that will allow us to support our selected publishers, including small and local publishers.

“The government has clarified that we will maintain the ability to decide whether news appears on Facebook so that we will not automatically submit to forced negotiations.

“We have always intended to support journalism in Australia and around the world, and we will continue to invest in news globally and resist attempts by media conglomerates to advance regulatory frameworks that do not take into account the true exchange of value between publishers and platforms like Facebook. “

TAMA LEAVER, PROFESSOR OF INTERNET STUDY AT CURTIN UNIVERSITY, AUSTRALIA

“This is not a draw.

“Even though Facebook managed to cover up some concessions and the laws might be lenient, I still think they are big losers here just because of the way they tried to negotiate over the past week. Many Australians are much more hesitant to rely on Facebook and in terms of their Australian reputation and user base have lost confidence.

“The law itself is still untested. It is like a weapon sitting on the treasury table that has never been used or tested. “

RICHARD WINDSOR, INDEPENDENT ENGLISH TECHNOLOGY ANALYSIS

“Facebook has scored a big win in reaching an agreement with the Australian government on payment of news from Australian sources in concessions that virtually guarantee that business will run as usual from now on.

“Prior to this“ sudden ”breakthrough, Facebook had cut off all Australian news outlets’ access to its platform which sparked huge public outrage. Critically, Australian news sites have also taken a big hit in internet traffic, clearly showing that Australian media need Facebook more than Facebook.

“Facebook has been accused of acting like North Korea in its actions, but I think they are completely justified because Australia (and everyone else) seems to view Facebook as a free public service rather than a business.

“As news sites quickly realized, their ad revenue tends to be lower without Facebook than with Facebook even if Facebook doesn’t pay them at all for their content.

“This clearly shows that the current arrangement is better than no arrangement at all. This idea of ​​free internet is a classic misconception held by the general public and legislators and the sooner this is eliminated, the faster a proper working relationship can be established. “

PAUL BUDDE, AUSTRALIA BASED INDEPENDENT INTERNET ANALYSIS

“Facebook won, because a necessary change was made to the law that prevented them from making changes to their business model.”

The Australian government can still say that they are “fighting giants and getting international attention (but) the digital giants are as strong as ever.” (Reporting by Colin Packham, Byron Kaye and Douglas Busvine; additional reporting by Renju Jose Editing by Susan Fenton)

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Fact Box: Where Australia’s important news content law stands | Instant News


CANBERRA (Reuters) – Australian lawmakers are expected to hold a final vote on Tuesday on whether to support a law that will force Facebook and Alphabet Inc.’s Google. pay news outlets for content.

FILE PHOTO: 3D printed Facebook logo seen in front of the Australian flag displayed in this illustration photo taken on February 18, 2021. REUTERS / Dado Ruvic / Illustration

The proposed legislation is being closely watched by other countries, which are considering whether to follow Australia’s lead in challenging the dominance of big tech companies in the news content market.

WHERE THE LEGISLATION STANDS

The law has been approved by the House of Representatives, the lower house of Parliament. It has now been transferred to the Senate, the upper house.

Australian senators began debating the law on Monday, with several opposition and independent lawmakers proposing amendments. So far, no amendments have been approved.

WHAT IS NEXT?

The Australian Government does not have a majority in the Senate so the law can be changed.

If the Senate approves the amendments, the law will need to be returned to the lower house, where the government holds the majority.

If the Senate does not change the law, the Senate will hold two more votes to pass the bill.

The Senate is scheduled to continue debating the law later Tuesday. Without amendments, that could pass quickly, but prolonged debate could result in the final vote being postponed until the afternoon.

FINALLY

If the Senate votes in favor of the bill after the third reading, it must go to the Governor General of Australia for a royal ascension before it becomes law, a formality.

LANDMARK

Australia is poised to become the first country to impose regulatory requirements on Facebook and Google paying media companies for news content.

Others are expected to follow. Canada said last week it would adopt a similar law proposed by Australia. The UK is also expected to unveil new rules that the government says will “try and help rebalance the relationship between publishers and online platforms.”

French copyright rules require large technology platforms to open talks with publishers seeking to reward use of news content.

Reporting by Colin Packham; editing by Richard Pullin and Sam Holmes

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Fact Box: Where Australia’s important news content law stands | Instant News


CANBERRA (Reuters) – Australian lawmakers are expected to hold a final vote on Tuesday on whether to support a law that will force Facebook and Alphabet Inc.’s Google. pay news outlets for content.

FILE PHOTO: 3D printed Facebook logo seen in front of the Australian flag displayed in this illustration photo taken on February 18, 2021. REUTERS / Dado Ruvic / Illustration

The proposed legislation is being closely watched by other countries, which are considering whether to follow Australia’s lead in challenging the dominance of big tech companies in the news content market.

WHERE THE LEGISLATION STANDS

The law has been approved by the House of Representatives, the lower house of Parliament. It has now been transferred to the Senate, the upper house.

Australian senators began debating the law on Monday, with several opposition and independent lawmakers proposing amendments. So far, no amendments have been approved.

WHAT IS NEXT?

The Australian Government does not have a majority in the Senate so the law can be changed.

If the Senate approves the amendments, the law will need to be returned to the lower house, where the government holds the majority.

If the Senate does not change the law, the Senate will hold two more votes to pass the bill.

The Senate is scheduled to continue debating the law later Tuesday. Without amendments, that could pass quickly, but prolonged debate could result in the final vote being postponed until the afternoon.

FINALLY

If the Senate votes in favor of the bill after the third reading, it must go to the Governor General of Australia for a royal ascension before it becomes law, a formality.

LANDMARK

Australia is poised to become the first country to impose regulatory requirements on Facebook and Google paying media companies for news content.

Others are expected to follow. Canada said last week it would adopt a similar law proposed by Australia. The UK is also expected to unveil new rules that the government says will “try and help rebalance the relationship between publishers and online platforms.”

French copyright rules require large technology platforms to open talks with publishers seeking to reward use of news content.

Reporting by Colin Packham; editing by Richard Pullin and Sam Holmes

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A British court blocked Epic Games from contesting Apple’s Fortnite ban | Instant News


(Reuters) – A UK antitrust court ruled on Monday that Epic Games, the creators of the popular game Fortnite, would not be allowed to pursue its case against Britain’s Apple Inc over its App Store payment system and control over app downloads.

The two companies have been at loggerheads since August, when the game maker tried to circumvent Apple’s 30% fee on the App Store by launching its own in-app payment system, leading to Apple’s next Fortnite ban from its stores.

A British court said Epic’s lawsuit against Alphabet Inc. Google may move forward, but thinks that the United States will be a better forum for its case against Apple.

“Epic will reconsider pursuing its case against Apple in the UK following the settlement of the US case,” the video game company said in a statement responding to the court’s decision.

Apple and Google did not immediately respond to Reuters requests for comment.

In October, a federal judge in California ruled in a request that Apple could ban Fortnite games from its App Store but shouldn’t hurt Epic’s developer tools business, which includes the “Unreal Engine” software used by hundreds of other video games.

Epic Games founder and chief executive Tim Sweeney previously said Apple’s control of the platform had tilted the level of the playing field.

Reporting by Chavi Mehta, Ayanti Bera and Subrat Patnaik in Bengaluru; Edited by Krishna Chandra Eluri

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A British court blocked Epic Games from contesting Apple’s Fortnite ban | Instant News


(Reuters) – A UK antitrust court ruled on Monday that Epic Games, the creators of the popular game Fortnite, would not be allowed to pursue its case against Britain’s Apple Inc over its App Store payment system and control over app downloads.

The two companies have been at loggerheads since August, when the game maker tried to circumvent Apple’s 30% fee on the App Store by launching its own in-app payment system, leading to Apple’s next Fortnite ban from its stores.

A British court said Epic’s lawsuit against Alphabet Inc. Google may move forward, but thinks that the United States will be a better forum for its case against Apple.

“Epic will reconsider pursuing its case against Apple in the UK following the settlement of the US case,” the video game company said in a statement responding to the court’s decision.

Apple and Google did not immediately respond to Reuters requests for comment.

In October, a federal judge in California ruled in a request that Apple could ban Fortnite games from its App Store but shouldn’t hurt Epic’s developer tools business, which includes the “Unreal Engine” software used by hundreds of other video games.

Epic Games founder and chief executive Tim Sweeney previously said Apple’s control of the platform had tilted the level of the playing field.

Reporting by Chavi Mehta, Ayanti Bera and Subrat Patnaik in Bengaluru; Edited by Krishna Chandra Eluri

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