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New Zealand premature twins born at 23 weeks at Wellington Hospital | Instant News


Declan Colquhoun was born at 23 weeks, weighing 400g, and no bigger than this pen. Photo / Provided

When Declan Colquhoun was born, his aunt’s wedding ring would be placed on his arm.

She and her twin Riley were born at just 23 weeks and one day on March 3. This is considered the survival threshold – babies born earlier are not usually resuscitated.

Declan weighs just 400g – a photo of him next to a pen shows how small it is – while Riley is only 530g.

More than two weeks later, Riley lost his battle for life, while eight months passed, Declan this week moved out of Wellington Hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit and is getting stronger every day. He now weighs 7kg.

Her twin brother, Riley, lost the fight for life at the age of 16.  Photo / Provided
Her twin brother, Riley, lost the fight for life at the age of 16. Photo / Provided

At 22 weeks pregnant, the twins’ mother Kathryn Hutchinson, 23, discovered she was suffering from high blood pressure when she saw a midwife. She was diagnosed with preeclampsia, a condition that affects pregnant women, and doctors decided it was safer for her to deliver the baby.

They were born by caesarean section. Their eyes, still tightly closed, were directed to the ventilator, with Hutchinson and partner Chris Colquhoun unable to carry their baby boy.

Colquhoun had to return to his job in traffic management immediately.

“The reality is life goes on. Bills can’t be held.”

On March 17, the Upper Hutts get a call that Declan is fighting for his life. They rush to the hospital to embrace – their first hug since she was born – preparing for the worst. But she struggled and Riley had her kidneys failing the next day.

“In the early hours of March 19, his little body decided it was enough and he grew his wings,” said Hutchinson.

The first and last hug with Riley.  Photo / Provided
The first and last hug with Riley. Photo / Provided

The couple held a small funeral ceremony for their 16-day-old son, days before the country was put under lockdown.

Then at three weeks of age, Declan opened his eyes for the first time.

But things got more difficult. Only mothers were allowed to visit their babies in the unit due to the risk of Covid-19 so Colquhoun would take Hutchinson to the hospital and wait outside in the parking lot. He didn’t see Declan for six weeks.

“It was terrible,” said Hutchinson. “She just lost her son and her other son is fighting for her life and she can’t be there.”

Declan’s recovery process has been slow. He underwent three surgical procedures a week.

“He’s very fragile.”

Hutchinson spent the whole day at his bedside and returned at night with Colquhoun after he finished work.

Declan with his parents Chris Colquhoun and Kathryn Hutchinson on his first trip outside.  Photo / Provided
Declan with his parents Chris Colquhoun and Kathryn Hutchinson on his first trip outside. Photo / Provided

But about a month ago Declan was well enough to go out for the first time in his life. His parents took him for a walk around the hospital grounds.

And this week, she was transferred from intensive care to the special care unit for babies at Hutt Hospital but still needs oxygen and a tube to feed.

“This is a step in the right direction,” said Hutchinson.

“Good things take time. His development is delayed but he’s smiling now and making quiet little sounds.”

The couple also have a marriage to look forward to when Declan is well enough – Colquhoun proposed in September.

Declan challenges all odds.

The latest data from the Ministry of Health states that between 2013-2017, 237 babies with a gestation period of 22-23 weeks were born alive. Of these, 230 babies died.

The number of babies who are part of twins surviving in the early stages will also be very rare.

Pediatric Society President Nicola Austin said last year a working group reached a consensus to alert babies born at 23 weeks gestation, with preparations starting at 22 weeks and five days. The threshold in some hospitals is 24 weeks.

Maternal use of corticosteroids in preterm labor (developed in New Zealand and used globally) and less aggressive pulmonary ventilation are some of the latest medical advances that mean babies born this early can be saved.

But Austin learned about one baby who survived at 22 weeks and six days and one baby weighing less than 400g who survived at 24 weeks.

Hutchinson has been supported by the Neonatal Trust which provides grooming packages, supermarkets and petrol vouchers, as well as arranging family gatherings with speakers.

Executive director Rachel Friend said saving younger babies is placing a greater demand on trust, as does Covid-19.

Declan this week has been transferred from the NICU weighing 7kg.  Photo / Provided
Declan this week has been transferred from the NICU weighing 7kg. Photo / Provided

It lost over $ 100,000 due to a canceled fundraising event. But in September, Hell Pizza donated $ 2 from every Unholy Donut sold to trusts – 34,248 eaten, raising $ 68,496.

Her friend’s 7-year-old son, Ruben, was born at 24 weeks, at what was “considered the survival line.”

He’s 665g and can fit in the palm of his hand if he’s allowed to hold it but the skin is “like paper”.

But now he’s growing fast.

“You don’t know anything is wrong. He reads above his age level, he plays football, he swims, he wants to play basketball next year, he likes mountain biking.”

Premature babies in NZ

• The youngest baby who survived preterm birth was born at 22 weeks and six days of gestation.

• The hospital performs resuscitation after 23 weeks.

• Between 2013 and 2017, 237 live babies were born with a gestation period of 22-23 weeks. There were 230 infant deaths at the same time during the same gestation period.

• About 10 percent of all babies are born prematurely (before 37 weeks gestation). That’s one every 90 minutes.

• There are six Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) in New Zealand that admit babies born before 32 weeks of age and 17 Specialized Infant Care Units (SCBU) at regional hospitals. Five thousand families each year use the facility.

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New Zealand Weather: Summer is spring for some, before the rains and rains arrive | Instant News


New Zealand

MetService national weather: November 13-15

Spring has turned into a countrywide summer this weekend, thanks to a high-pressure system in the north and warm westerly winds blowing in the south.

Auckland residents came out enjoying the sunshine yesterday after avoiding a possible lockdown with the latest Covid case genomically linked to a Defense Force cluster.

It was as if summer had arrived in Mission Bay with kids going in and out of the water – and the sand.

The summer mood continues into the day as temperatures in most major centers will hit 20 ° C, with Christchurch, Blenheim and Timaru expecting summer temperatures of 25 ° C and Tauranga 24 ° C.

Upper North Island centers can expect highest temperatures in the lowest 20s – Auckland and Hamilton should hit 22C, Rotorua 21C and Napier 23C.

Temperatures on the North Island are nearly normal for the time of year, but above average for parts of the South Island thanks to nor’westers, says MetService meteorologist Kyle Lee.

“In the east we’re talking 4C to 7C above average.”

Cooler days in the western and southern parts of the North Island – Wellington would be fine but with temperatures of 18C and New Plymouth, also good, 19C.

Most of the place will be dry, with the exception of a few parts further south, Lee said.

“The weather today is quite good. There is a bit of high pressure that keeps most of the country fine.”

Heavy rain could ruin parties in Otago, Southland and parts of Westland and a heavy rain warning has been issued for Fiordland – rain is expected to fall as high as 150mm before 9pm tonight.

Meanwhile, Sunday sunshine in most parts of the country will make way for some to kick off a humid work week.

North Islanders can expect heavy rains to spread over much of the island, from Northland to Wellington, and from Taranaki to the east.

It will be warm in Auckland, with temperatures as high as 22 ° C, but it will rain from late afternoon, with a similar story in Hamilton.

A brief afternoon of rain is expected in Wellington tomorrow, with temperatures as high as 18C.

On the South Island, rain and rain are expected to occur in many places during the day, before it clears up at night.

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Armenian officials compared Israel to Nazi Germany amid the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict | Instant News


The Advisor to the Chief of the General Staff of the Armenian Army Vladimir Pogosyan on Thursday compared Israel to Nazi Germany and promised revenge for its support for Azerbaijan in the conflict in the Nagorno-Karabakh region.

“Politicians in Armenia are finally starting to realize what Europe and Israel are, especially Israel. Israel today and Germany in 1933 are the same. The only difference is that I have understood it since the first war,” Podosyan wrote on Facebook.

“We will not forgive anyone, and we will not forget whose hand is covered in Armenian blood. The day will come, and we will take revenge. Israel, Turkey and other countries are building Azerbaijan armies. And what they achieved with it. ? We’ll win! Don’t hesitate about that. “

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GO NZ: New Zealand summer festivals and events to order now | Instant News


We’ve all spent more than enough time looking inside our homes this year. With long awaited warm weather finally creeping up on us, it’s time to let go of those cobwebs and take advantage of all the exciting events and festivals happening around New Zealand this summer – because we’ve had a little fun.

The epicenter for all things edible: Hawke's Bay Food and Wine Classic.  Photo / Kirsten Simcox, Provided
The epicenter for all things edible: Hawke’s Bay Food and Wine Classic. Photo / Kirsten Simcox, Provided

Summer FAWC!

November 6-15

Arguably New Zealand’s center for great food and fine wine, Hawke’s Bay hosts 10 days and over 60 events for this delicious festival. The Food and Wine Classic features the best of local restaurants, wineries, brewers and producers joining forces for an unforgettable program, in some of the country’s most stunning locations, from street food festivals to exclusive evenings combining art and food and honeycomb to tables high tea. see fawc.co.nz for details.

Nothing says Summer like the Black Hats at Oval Bay.  Photo / Andrew Cornaga, Photosport, Files
Nothing says Summer like the Black Hats at Oval Bay. Photo / Andrew Cornaga, Photosport, Files

Summer Cricket

starting 27 November

Nothing says Summer is like the start of a five-day trial match, and despite what 2020 throws at the world, the Black Caps will face Australia, Bangladesh, West Indies and Pakistan in the upcoming 2020-21 season. Games will be played across the country, and include T-20, ODI and test matches. see nzc.nz for all the details.

The biggest exhibit in the history of the Auckland Art Gallery: Toi o Tamaki at Britomart.  Photo / Patrick Reynolds, Given
The biggest exhibit in the history of the Auckland Art Gallery: Toi o Tamaki at Britomart. Photo / Patrick Reynolds, Given

You you you or

December 5 – March 31

Staged in the heart of Britomart, this is the official Toi tū Toi ora satellite show at the Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand’s largest contemporary Māori art exhibition in nearly 20 years, including 300 works by more than 120 Māori artists. see aucklandartgallery.com for more details.

Incredible creation: The World of Wearable Art at Te Papa.  Photo / Provided
Incredible creation: The World of Wearable Art at Te Papa. Photo / Provided

Wearable Art World: Up Close

12 December – 14 February

If you’ve ever wondered what actually goes into these incredible creations, here’s your chance to experience a World of Wearable Art like never before. The in-depth exhibition at Wellington’s Te Papa showcases more than 30 extraordinary outfits from the world’s leading clothing arts competitions, with visitors able to explore the creativity and extraordinary detail of the clothes and the stories behind the designs. see

for more information.

It's finally here: The America's Cup World Series takes over Auckland's waterfront.  Photo / Richard Gladwell, Sail-World.com, Files
It’s finally here: The America’s Cup World Series takes over Auckland’s waterfront. Photo / Richard Gladwell, Sail-World.com, Files

America’s Cup

starting December 17th

Finally it’s here. Auckland is set to host the 36th Copa America and the action starts this December. There are three events that round out the race for the Cup – the Auckland American Cup World Series brings together three challengers against the Emirates New Zealand Team for the Christmas Cup starting 17 December, before the Prada Cup – and the scramble to take on Team NZ for the big – starts on January 15. The final series of races for the America’s Cup runs from March 6 to 21. There will definitely be a lot of events going on in and around the Viaduct as the action heats up. check aucklandnz.com for details when released.

Great acoustics, unbeatable atmosphere: Black Barn Amphitheater, Havelock North.  Photo / Glenn Taylor, Hawke's Bay Today
Great acoustics, unbeatable atmosphere: Black Barn Amphitheater, Havelock North. Photo / Glenn Taylor, Hawke’s Bay Today

Black Barn Concert Series

Starting December 19

This amphitheater in the Hawke’s Bay vineyard is widely considered to be one of New Zealand’s best outdoor spots, with great acoustics and an unbeatable atmosphere. This summer, check out an outdoor cinema that opens as part of the Hawke’s Bay Outdoor Film Festival from December 27th. If you want a little music, summer queues are still in the works, but it’s confirmed, Kiwi legend Dave Dobbyn will be performing alongside 2020 local darling The Beths on December 19. Tickets start at $ 69, look blackbarn.com for details.

Distinction Hotels Te Anau Tennis Invitational

December 28-29

It’s a shame the ASB Classic has been postponed for 2021 (thanks Covid), but this annual tournament features some of New Zealand’s strongest male tennis players over two days of action in a relaxed atmosphere, perfect for the whole family. General admission is $ 15.00 per adult and children are free. see teanautennis.co.nz for details.

The Other Side Festival

December 30 – 31

Whangamatā, usually considered a quintessential Kiwi beach town, holds this two-day music festival at the mysterious-sounding Joe’s Farm, just outside the summer hot spot. Visitors can camp on site, or take a bus to see a lineup of famous Kiwi artists such as Shapeshifter, LAB, David Dallas and JessB. Tickets start at $ 118 from theotherside.nz.

Soundsplash

January 22-24

Happy 20th birthday to Raglan’s favorite. This summer’s favorite celebrates milestones in style, with lineups of local legends including Fat Freddy’s Drop, Ladi6, Che Fu and Home Brew taking to four stages at the Wainui Reserve, while markets also return. see soundsplash.co.nz for more details.

Saturday Six60 Tour

Various dates in January and February

They are arguably New Zealand’s biggest band, and now Six60 have their gigs on the road, visiting new cities and big venues on six Saturdays in January and February. Starting in Lower Hutt and stopping at Waitangi, Hastings, New Plymouth, Christchurch, Wellington and Hamilton along the way, they’ll have special guests and big hits of their own. see six60.co.nz for details.

    The Tussock Traverse is one of New Zealand's most beautiful courses.  Photo / Kurt Matthews, Given
The Tussock Traverse is one of New Zealand’s most beautiful courses. Photo / Kurt Matthews, Given

Tussock Traverse

January 30th

The Ruapehu region is an outdoor lover’s paradise and the Tussock Traverse is one of New Zealand’s most beautiful and diverse courses. Events for hikers and runners – ranging from 6 km to 50 km – offer something for everyone who wants a different challenge. This event supports the Tongariro Project (Tongariro Natural History Society), and the work they are doing to preserve this spectacular area. see tussocktraverse.co.nz for entry details.

A celebration of cunning and speed: Burt Munro Challenge, Invercargill.  Photo / James Jubb, Given
A celebration of cunning and speed: Burt Munro Challenge, Invercargill. Photo / James Jubb, Given

Burt Munro’s challenge

February 10-14

This Southland classic has cemented its name as one of New Zealand’s premier motor sporting events. Over the course of five action-packed days, a number of racing disciplines will race including hill climbing, beach racing, sprint racing, speedway and road racing. And the whole festival honors the legendary Burt, his ingenuity, determination and love of speed and motorbikes. see burtmunrochallenge.co.nz for more details.

Two great nights: Hamilton Garden Arts Festival.  Photo / Mark Hamilton, Supplied Visit Waikato
Two great nights: Hamilton Garden Arts Festival. Photo / Mark Hamilton, Supplied Visit Waikato

Hamilton Park Arts Festival

February 19 – March 1

What is now an iconic outdoor summer festival for the city, the Hamilton Park Arts Festival combines visual arts, music, comedy, film, theater, literature and dance for two weeks of fun. This festival has been Waikato’s premier arts event for over 20 years and the 2021 list will be released any time. see hgaf.co.nz for the latest news and announcements.

Flying circus: New Zealand's best viewing team at Wings over Wairarapa.  Photo / Provided
Flying circus: New Zealand’s best viewing team at Wings over Wairarapa. Photo / Provided

Air Wing Festival Over Wairarapa

February 26 – 28

With the Wānaka sisters’ event canceled this year due to Covid-19, this Wairarapa favorite will be New Zealand’s first major air show in two years. In addition to the spectacular flying program, there are fantastic ground shows, as well as activities for kids little and big. Previous events have drawn crowds of 25,000 people – almost the equivalent of the entire Masterton population – so we know it’s the weekend Kiwis will be lining up to be a part of. see wings.org.nz for more details.

For more New Zealand travel ideas and inspiration, visit newzealand.com

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BYC Podcast: The latest cricket events from around the world | Instant News


BYC is back for another season.

It’s back! BYC, New Zealand’s best-known and most feared specialty cricket podcast, has been holding out for the next season.

Join Jason Hoyte, Paul Ford, Dylan Cleaver and a number of other dubious guests for unmistakable summer sounds and aromas.

In this episode, the panel celebrates the fact that there is finally cricket in New Zealand with the start of the Plunket Shield. They share stories about Imran Khan’s form (on and off the pitch) and some extreme promotion ideas for local cricket, discuss the best ground for your backyard goal, and Dylan identifies three up-and-coming players to watch out for this season.

Listen to the latest episodes of the BYC podcast here:

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