Tag Archives: Athletics

Tigers travel to Kiawah Island for second Spring tournament – Clemson Tigers official track site | Instant News



Clemson, SC – The Clemson Women’s Golf Team is set to return to the course as they take the short hike to participate in the Palmetto Spring Intercollegiate February 21-22. The event, which is hosted by the College of Charleston, will take place on the 6,021 yard, par 72 Turtle Point course located at the Kiawah Island Resort in Kiawah Island, SC The tournament marks the first of two program events held in the State of South Carolina as the Tigers are set to host the Clemson Invitational March 26-28 at The Reserve on Lake Keowee. Out of the 10-team field, seven programs enter the Palmetto Intercollegiate with at least one spring tournament completed while NC State and Virginia lead the field with two events already stored in 2021. Having finished eighth of 15 teams in the Opening the LTWF Heroes Ladies Intercollegiate season in Sarasota, Fla., fifth-year head coach Kelley Hester is looking to lead her team to a top spot. The same lineup composed of Ivy Shepherd, Annabelle Pancake. Alexandra Swayne, Savannah Grewal and Gracyn Burgess will headline the national competition. Shepherd, 36th ranked player in the country according to Golfweek, led the Tigers last time after placing in the top 15. Shooting a tie in the 54-hole event, the junior shot rounds 72-70-74, moving her career total to 22 rounds at par or better. The Peachtree City, Ga. Native, who saw her score count during the three days of the season opener, now has her score tallied in 46 of her 49 career rounds. Savannah Grewal was second among the Clemson squad in the season opener after shooting 74-74-73 for a finish of five over par. In her first collegiate event, rookie Annabelle Pancake finished with an aggregate score of seven over par, 223, to finish 31st in the player standings. The tournament kicks off Sunday morning with the course playing 36 continuous holes of play before concluding the event on Monday with 18 holes of action. FIELDClemson, College of Charleston, Duke, East Carolina, Furman, Indiana, North Carolina, NC State, (5) Virginia, (22) Virginia Tech and (7) Wake ForestRankings provided by Golfweek / Sagarin survey as of February 18



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Biden says decisions at the 2020 Olympics ‘must be based on science’ | Instant News


FILE PHOTO: A man wearing a face mask walks in front of a wall decoration featuring the mascot for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics Miraitowa amidst the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Tokyo, Japan, February 3, 2021. REUTERS / Kim Kyung-Hoon

TOKYO (Reuters) – Any decision on hosting the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, which was postponed a year due to the coronavirus pandemic, must be based on science, US President Joe Biden said on a radio show.

The Olympics are due to start in less than six months, and the Japanese government and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) have vowed to hold them as planned, albeit under strict conditions that could include staging without spectators.

Biden, speaking on the Westwood One Sports radio program that airs on Sunday during the Super Bowl halftime, said he hopes the Olympics will take place, especially for the athletes who have trained hard for them.

“I have spoken with the Japanese prime minister, he is working really hard to be in a safe position to open the Olympics, host the Olympics, and I think it has to be based on science, whether it is safe or not for that to happen,” said Biden.

Biden, who took office in January, said he hated the thought of athletes not being able to compete.

“Imagine all the Olympians who work for four years, four years for one opportunity and suddenly that opportunity is gone,” he said.

“These are people I feel pain in – but we have to do it scientifically,” he added. “We are a science-driven administration, I think the rest of the world is there too. I hope we can play, I hope it is possible, but that remains to be seen. “

The Olympics will open on July 23 and run until August 8.

Reporting by Elaine Lies, editing by Ed Osmond

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Australia aims to vaccinate athletes before the Tokyo Olympics | Instant News


MELBOURNE (Reuters) – Australia aims to vaccinate its Olympians against COVID-19 before they head to the Tokyo Olympics, said federal sports minister Richard Colbeck.

FILE PHOTO: The logo of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, which was postponed until 2021 due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, is on display at the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Office building in Tokyo, Japan January 22, 2021. REUTERS / Issei Kato / File Photo

Advice from the body that coordinates vaccination launch plans suggests that athletes will most likely be inoculated before 23 July-August. 8 Games, Colbeck said in comments published by the Canberra Times on Thursday.

“If our plans are successful, it is very likely that the Olympic athletes, for example, we will discuss it before they go to the Olympics,” he was quoted as saying.

Colbeck later issued a statement saying that “older Australians, frontline workers and those with underlying medical conditions” will be prioritized and that “most athletes” will be vaccinated in the next phase of launch.

A number of national olympic committees plan to vaccinate their athletes before the Olympics.

Israel’s Olympic Committee says it has vaccinated half of the Olympic delegation and will complete the process by the end of May.

South Korean Prime Minister Chung Sye-kyun said, “Of course athletes have to be vaccinated if they are going to participate,” when asked in an interview with Reuters on Thursday.

South Korea has said it will decide whether to vaccinate the 157 athletes registered so far when Japan comes to an official decision to continue with the Olympics.

International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach said on Wednesday that the governing body does not support athletes who “jump in line” for the COVID-19 vaccine.

The Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) said it hoped athletes could be vaccinated but said vulnerable people and healthcare workers should come first.

“We recommend and encourage our athletes to be vaccinated but support the IOC’s position that it is not mandatory,” said an AOC spokesman.

Reporting by Ian Ransom and Hyonhee Shin in Seoul; Edited by Toby Davis, Edwina Gibbs, Peter Rutherford

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Australia plans to vaccinate athletes before the Tokyo Olympics | Instant News


MELBOURNE (Reuters) – Australia plans to vaccinate its Olympians against COVID-19 before they head to the Tokyo Olympics, said federal sports minister Richard Colbeck.

Colbeck confirmed there are plans for athletes to be vaccinated against COVID-19 before 23 July-August. 8 Games.

“We have received advice from ATAGI (Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunization) about the launch plan, the athletes are according to that plan and we will do it,” Senator Colbeck said in comments published by the Canberra Times on Thursday.

“If our plans work out well, it might very well be that the Olympic athletes, for example, we will discuss it before they go to the Olympics.”

A number of national Olympic committees are planning to vaccinate their athletes.

Israel’s Olympic Committee told Reuters on Wednesday that it had vaccinated half of the Olympic delegation and would complete the process by the end of May.

International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach said on Wednesday that the governing body does not support athletes who “jump in line” for the COVID-19 vaccine.

The Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) said it hoped athletes could be vaccinated but said vulnerable people and healthcare workers should come first.

“We recommend and encourage our athletes to get vaccinated but support an IOC position which is not mandatory,” said an AOC spokesman on Thursday.

Reporting by Ian Ransom; Edited by Toby Davis

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Stewart McSweyn covered the world’s fastest distance for 2020, becoming the fastest Australian for 15 years | Instant News


Australian long-distance running star Stewart McSweyn has wrapped up an unprecedented year in incredible style in the most unlikely of places.

Competing in the Tasmania Christmas Carnival gathering in Penguin (population 3,849 at last count), McSweyn took the lead in a three-minute 50.61 second long-distance race on Tuesday night.

It is the fastest distance run anywhere in the world in 2020 and fastest by an Australian in 15 years.

“Penguin is probably not the place most people associate with sprinting so it’s pretty cool to put on a good show in front of the crowd,” said McSweyn, who is from nearby King Island.

“It’s one of those old lines like you find in a lot of places around Australia.

Obviously nothing comes close to the track standards we get in Europe, especially in the Diamond League.

“But for rural areas, it’s really a decent track.”

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The win rounded off an extraordinary season for the 25-year-old, who also broke the long-standing national 1,500m and 3,000m records on the Diamond League circuit and is now shaping the original medal shot at the rescheduled Tokyo 2021 Olympics.

While many of Australia’s biggest track and field stars have chosen to stay at home due to concerns surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, McSweyn and his Melbourne Track Club teammates traveled to Europe to spend the summer in the northern hemisphere.

The decision paid off, although the likes of McSweyn and coaching partners including Ryan and Genevieve Gregson, Brett Robinson and Matthew Ramsden had to endure a nervous two-week wait in London before finally securing a flight home in late October.

Then there was the mandatory two-week quarantine assignment in Brisbane, which would at least allow McSweyn to continue his university studies.

“Obviously we have an advantage,” said McSweyn.

“I can use 2020 as a running practice for 2021.

“Having a lot of high standard races abroad gives us an advantage because it’s difficult if you get a year off to try and find your best again in person.”

McSweyn’s favorite appearance of the year came in Doha at the end of September, when he won the 1,500m to enter 10-year-old Ryan Gregson’s national mark into the history books.

“Not because I broke the record but purely because I was able to run the race I wanted to do,” he said.

“The Diamond League is where everyone is watching and you can put yourself on the map.

“It was the biggest race I have ever won.”

McSweyn has yet to decide on his racing program for the Tokyo Olympics, although 1,500m is priority number one.

AAP

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