Tag Archives: Athletics

List of Sports TV for Week of May 24: Live broadcast and rebroadcast | Sports | Instant News


6 am: ESPN2, Monaco Grand Prix 2018

8:30 am: ESPN2, 2019 Monaco Grand Prix

11 am: ESPN2, Monaco Virtual Formula One Grand Prix (direct)

Afternoon: ESPN2, Monaco Pro Formula One eSports Exhibition One (live)

1 thing .: ESPN2, Monaco Virtual Formula One Grand Prix (direct)

2 things: Fox Sports 1, NASCAR Cup Series, Coca-Cola 600, qualifying, at Concord, N.C. (live)

2 things: WSLS, “Indy 500 Special: Back Home Again,” 2019 Indianapolis 500 with new comment and prerace features

3 things: Fox Sports 1, “100,000 Cameras: Return of NASCAR” (new)

3 things: ESPN2, 2006 Indianapolis 500

4:30 p.m .: WFXR, NASCAR special preview

5 pages: ESPN2, 2011 Indianapolis 500

6 things: WFXR, NASCAR Cup Series, Coca-Cola 600, at Concord, N.C. (live; prerace performance at 5:30 p.m.)

7 pages: ESPN2, 2014 Indianapolis 500

6 pages: Fox Sports 1, PBA Tournament of Champions from February

8 pages: Fox Sports 1, PBA U.S. Open from February

Midday, ACC Network, 2014 ACC championship, Maryland-Georgia Tech

2 things: ACC Network, ACC 2016 Championship, FSU-Clemson

11 pages: ESPN2, “One For The Ages” (ESPN2 debut SEC documentary film on the 2019 LSU soccer team)

3 things: ESPN, “30 for 30: Killing The Badger”

9 pages: ESPN, ESPN2, “30 to 30: Lance,” Part I (new; uncensored version on ESPN)

3 things: NBC Sports Network, SIM Drone Racing League SIM Cup Race, Race 2 (new)

2 things: WSET, 2020 Desert Invitational from February

11 am: Golf Channel, Senior PGA 2016 Championship, final round

3 things: TNT, TBS, truTV, HLN, Champions for Charity: Woods / Manning vs. Mickelson / Brady, at Hobe Sound, Fla. (Live)

3 things: WDBJ, PGA Tour, 2019 Canadian Open, final round

3 pages: Golf Channel, LPGA Tour, 2019 Pure Silk Championship, final round

8 pages: Golf Channel, “GOLF Films: Tiger Slam” (new)

8 pages: NBC Sports Network, 2012 Ryder Cup, last day

1 morning (Monday): NBC Sports Network, PGA Tour, 2013 Player Championship, final round

1 thing .: Fox Sports 2, live race

15:30: Fox Sports 1, live race

4 pages: NBC Sports Network, live race

1:30 pm .: MASN, 2015 Baltimore-Washington game

5:30 p .: MASN, 2015 Scherzer no-hitter

11:30 pm .: MASN, 2007 game where Bonds broke the home run record

4 pages: ACC Network, ACC 2020 Tournament, Notre Dame-BC

6 pages: ACC Network, 2011 ACC Tournament, North Carolina-Clemson

8 pages: ACC Network, 2013 Final ACC Tournament, Miami-North Carolina

10 pages: ACC Network, ACC 2020 Tournament, Clemson-Miami

Afternoon: ESPN, “The Best of ‘It’s SportsCenter’: 25 Years and Counting”

1 thing .: ESPN, “The Best of ‘It’s SportsCenter’: The Superstars”

2 things: ESPN, “The Best of ‘This SportsCenter’: Mascot Mayhem”

2:30 p .: ESPN, “Featured SportsCenter: Who Says I Can’t”

3 things .: WSET, “The Last Dance,” Episode 1-2

4:30 pm .: ESPN, “Game 6: The Movie”

7 nights .: ESPN, “The Last Dance,” Episode 9-10

8 pm .: NBC Sports Washington, 2014 Washington-Chicago game

9 am to 7 pm: NBC Sports Washington, the Capitals game marathon from 2018 and 2019

7 nights .: NBC Sports Washington, 2008 Washington-Atlanta game

7:20 am .: Fox Sports 1, Bundesliga, Augsburg on Schalke (direct)

8 am: NBC Sports Network, Manchester United-Manchester City 2015 match

9:30 am: Fox Sports 1, Bundesliga, Leipzig in Mainz (straight)

10 am: NBC Sports Network, Chelsea-Liverpool 2015 match

11:50 am: Fox Sports 1, Bundesliga, Fortuna Dusseldorf in Cologne (direct)

Afternoon: Tennis Channels, UTR Pro Women’s Match Series, Third Place and Final Match (live)

Afternoon: ESPNU, 2014 NCAA championship, Syracuse-Maryland

2 things: ESPNU, 2015 NCAA championship, UNC-Maryland

4 pages: ESPNU, 2016 NCAA championship, UNC-Maryland

6 pages: ESPNU, 2017 NCAA championship, BC-Maryland

8 pages: ESPNU, 2018 NCAA championship, BC-JMU

10 pages: ESPNU, 2019 NCAA championship, BC-Maryland

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Canada confirms running race and marathon candidates for Tokyo | Instant News


Athletics – World Athletics Championships – Doha 2019 – Men’s 50 Kilometer Race Road – Khalifa International Stadium, Doha, Qatar – 29 September 2019 Canadian bronze medalist Evan Dunfee during the REUTERS / Ibraheem Al Omari medal ceremony

(Reuters) – Canadian raceman Evan Dunfee, the 50km bronze medalist in the world championship, and marathon runners Trevor Hofbauer and Dayna Pidhoresky have been nominated for their event at the delayed Tokyo 2020 Olympics, Athletics Canada said on Tuesday.

The International Olympic Committee announced in March that athletes who had already qualified for the Tokyo Olympics would maintain their place at the Olympics, which were pushed back a year until July 23 to August 8, 2021 because of a new outbreak of coronavirus.

“There has been a lot of uncertainty surrounding this game over the past few weeks and we are happy to focus on the extraordinary achievements of our athletes today,” Canadian Athletics high-performance director Simon Nathan said in a statement.

“With a new time frame for work, athletes, coaches and staff we have a new finish line to work towards and we all look forward to the time when we can return to track and field and represent Canada.”

Dunfee, who also won the Pan American Games 2015 in a 20 km race, was better than the standard qualification of the 50 km Olympic race for 3 hours, 50 minutes during the race in Japan last year, one minute faster.

Hofbauer and Pidhoresky both met the nomination criteria by winning the 2019 Canadian Marathon Championship in Toronto last October.

Canada has two places in the women’s marathon and although three runners have met Olympic standards, Athletics Canada said it would wait to fill in entries.

“With so much time before the match and the possibility of additional qualifications for other athletes, we have decided not to nominate others for the women’s marathon at this time,” Nathan said.

The list of Canadian Athletics final nominations will be submitted to the Canadian Olympic Committee in 2021, closer to the Olympics.

Reporting by Steve Keating in Toronto. Editing by Toby Davis

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Canadian-Athletics confirmed the race and marathon nomination for Tokyo | Instant News


May 5 (Reuters) – Canadian race runner Evan Dunfee, world championship bronze medalist 50 km, and marathon runners Trevor Hofbauer and Dayna Pidhoresky have been nominated for their event at the delayed Tokyo 2020 Olympics, Athletics Canada said on Tuesday.

The International Olympic Committee announced in March that athletes who had already qualified for the Tokyo Olympics would maintain their place at the Olympics, which were pushed back a year until July 23 to August 8, 2021 because of a new outbreak of coronavirus.

“There has been a lot of uncertainty surrounding this game over the past few weeks and we are happy to focus on the extraordinary achievements of our athletes today,” Canadian Athletics high-performance director Simon Nathan said in a statement.

“With a new time frame for work, athletes, coaches and staff we have a new finish line to work towards and we all look forward to the time when we can return to track and field and represent Canada.”

Dunfee, who also won the Pan American Games 2015 in a 20 km race, was better than the standard qualification of the 50 km Olympic race for 3 hours, 50 minutes during the race in Japan last year, one minute faster.

Hofbauer and Pidhoresky both met the nomination criteria by winning the 2019 Canadian Marathon Championship in Toronto last October.

Canada has two places in the women’s marathon and although three runners have met Olympic standards, Athletics Canada said it would wait to fill in entries.

“With so much time before the match and the possibility of additional qualifications for other athletes, we have decided not to nominate others for the women’s marathon at this time,” Nathan said.

The list of Canadian Athletics final nominations will be submitted to the Canadian Olympic Committee in 2021, closer to the Olympics. (Reporting by Steve Keating in Toronto. Editing by Toby Davis)

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Sprinter Thomas denied the allegations after he and Stevens were suspended by AIU | Instant News


FILE PHOTOS: Athletics – Diamond League – Pontaise Stadium, Lausanne, Switzerland – July 5, 2018 Gabrielle Thomas from the US celebrates the 200m victory REUTERS Women / Denis Balibouse

(Reuters) – American speed runner Gabrielle Thomas said on Friday she hoped to be released from accusations by the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) for failing to provide herself for an anti-doping test.

23-year-old Deajah Stevens and a fellow American on the previous day were temporarily suspended by AIU for allegedly losing three tests in a 12-month period, a violation of anti-doping rules.

“I am sure that at least one of these tests has been invalid and that I will be completely removed,” Thomas, a two-time 200 million winner in the Lausanne Diamond League, said in a statement available to Reuters by his agent.

“Telephone tracking data and many witnesses will conclusively show that I am in the exact location that I made at my place and that doping control officers failed to find me and failed to follow the proper protocol,” Thomas added.

“Athletes have very high standards and doping control organizations should have the same high standards.”

Stevens, who reached the 2016 Rio Olympics final 200 meters high, could not be reached for comment.

AIU also suspended Alex Korio Oloitiptip from Kenya, who took part in the INEOS challenge 1:59 last year which made compatriot Eliud Kipchoge become the first person to run a marathon in less than two hours.

The three athletes could face a two-year ban.

AIU also said on Friday that Mikel Kiprotich Mutai from Kenya, who won the Hong Kong marathon in 2016, was temporarily suspended for failing a test for the prohibited substance, norandrosterone.

Reporting by Gene Cherry and Julien Pretot; Editing by Ken Ferris and Christian Radnedge

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Special Olympics Summer Olympics will return to Richmond next year News | Instant News


It became a summer tradition in Madison County.

Athletes from across the state flocked to the Eastern Kentucky University campus on the first weekend in June for the Kentucky State Summer Games Special Olympics.

This event has been held in Richmond for 25 years in a row.

Unfortunately, the line will end soon.

The Kentucky Special Olympics announced earlier this month that the 2020 Summer Games were canceled due to the COVID-19 crisis.

This event is scheduled for 5 to 7 June.

“To be honest, it’s really heartbreaking to make that decision,” said Mark Buerger, director of communications and external relations for the Kentucky Special Olympics. “We are faced with no other choice that is really good.”

Many other organizations have had to make the same difficult decisions in the last few weeks.

Special Olympics Kentucky officials not only care about problems with social distance and restrictions at large gatherings, they are determined to protect the integrity of the competition.

Athletes are required to train and compete in regional events ahead of state matches.

That has not been possible for nearly the past two months.

“Once they are not allowed to train and then we are not allowed to hold our spring qualifications, there is no way we will be able to hold the Summer Games in a way that is responsible for our programs and athletes and the work they do every day,” said Buerger.

There are more than 11,000 Special Olympic athletes in Kentucky, competing in 15 athletic activities.

“We have athletes from almost every region in the state,” said Buerger.

That includes a very strong local contingent.

Madison County Special Olympics has more than 100 athletes, ranging from ages 8 to 54, who compete throughout the year in six sports – track and field, basketball, golf, softball, flag football, and bowling.

Not all of these athletes compete at the annual Summer Games, but this event certainly has additional meaning for those who are bound to the Madison County organization.

“We have many volunteers who help and participate in whatever way they can at the Summer Olympics,” said Jamie Moore of the Madison County Special Olympics. “We were there a few days before when they started to prepare and were at the end to clean up. We were very separate from the event.”

Moore said that he knew that canceling the Summer Olympics and all other Special Olympic activities was very hard for everyone in the organization.

“I have many athletes who send me messages, asking when we will start again,” Moore said. “Everyone wants to see their friends and become active again.

The Kentucky State Summer Games Special Olympics featured around 1,400 athletes competing in five sports – track and field, swimming, rhythmic gymnastics, soccer, and bocce.

This organization holds many events throughout the state in other sports, especially bowling, but a trip to Richmond every year is something everyone is waiting for.

“This has been the most exciting weekend of the year,” said Buerger. “Richmond and EKU are the spiritual heart of our program. We have spent half of our program there.”

The Kentucky State Summer Games Special Olympics migrated around the Commonwealth for more than two decades, changing locations every two years.

Until the event found a permanent home in EKU.

“Our athletes, families and volunteers hope to come to Richmond every year, and there is a good reason for that. That’s because the city and the university have treated us so well for every 25 years before,” said Trish Mazzoni, President / CEO, Kentucky Special Olympics. “Every trip to Richmond feels like coming home. We are very grateful for the welcome and hospitality of this city. We will miss you all year long, and we can’t wait to see you in 2021.”

The game will return to Richmond.

But this year’s cancellation disappointed athletes for various reasons.

They won’t be able to compete, of course, but they also won’t get some additional benefits from this program.

Every year, the Kentucky Special Olympics hosts the Healthy Athlete Wellness Village at a summer event, where athletes can go through six different screening services – teeth, vision, hearing, podiatry, flexibility, and strong minds.

“We provide free glasses through our Eye Opening Program,” Buerger. “So, that’s just another thing athletes will miss.”

The organization has put in place a way for the public to support Special Olympics athletes in Kentucky.

Virtual summer games are masterpieces and more details will be available soon.

“People can register to become Special Olympics Champions,” said Buerger. “There are some very simple fundraisers for people to respect athletes.”

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