Tag Archives: Aviation

Vaccinated countries wary of reopening air travel in case of relapse | Instant News


Photographer: Wei Leng Tay / Bloomberg Photographer: Wei Leng Tay / Bloomberg Countries that have quickly rolled out coronavirus vaccines are only cautiously reopening for international travel, a sign that it will take time for a hoped-for rebound in air traffic expands. capacity remains stuck at around a tenth of 2019 levels, as the government sets the May 17 target of restarting international travel. Israel, where nearly 55% of the population has been fully vaccinated, is preparing to welcome visitors in groups from May 23 if they can show they have received the vaccine. Policymakers face a difficult balance. A second consecutive summer without major air travel would spell a major setback for an already struggling aviation industry, as well as hotels, shops and restaurants that depend on tourism. Meanwhile, there are fears that premature reopening may help spread new strains of the coronavirus and jeopardize progress towards slowing the spread of the disease. The capacity of still anchored seats remains blocked despite high vaccination levels Source: OAG United States can provide a test case. The country struggles to keep infection rates low, even as a powerful vaccination campaign accelerates. While international travel to most destinations is still prohibited, domestic capacity is increasing, with airlines planning to add flights in the coming weeks. Chile is already in full retreat. The Latin American country obtained its supplies from the Chinese company Sinovac Biotech Ltd. and has fully immunized more than a quarter of its population. After reopening for air travel in November, it has now backed down, closing its borders to most this month in response to a spike in Covid-19 cases. Cautious approach In the UK, around half of the population has received at least one dose. The government, determined to protect the hard-earned success of reducing infection rates, said it would review data early next month on which countries should be greenlisted in its traffic light system, before making a final decision on the month of May. 17 objective of lifting the ban on non-essential travel. Airlines have called for Britain to clear the way for a reopening in the region. Wizz Air Holdings Plc CEO Jozsef Varadi said this week he no longer expected a rebound in European air travel during the peak season this summer, citing travel restrictions and problems with vaccine deployment. Keen to restart tourism, the government announced that it would only reopen in stages from May 23. The groups will start because they are easier to monitor, according to Haaretz. No date has been set to allow individual travelers and health officials will monitor infection rates before making a decision. Neighboring UAE has remained open to air travel for months, while focusing on rapid vaccinations. However, its long-distance hubs in Dubai and Abu Dhabi revolve around 50% of their capacity, depending on large countries in Europe and Asia to lift the borders. Asia has generally relied on social distancing measures to keep infection rates low. Singapore has one of the highest vaccination rates in the region, with around 20% of its population receiving at least one dose. Visits to low-risk countries like New Zealand are permitted under certain circumstances. As part of one program, business travelers stay in a confined area near Changi Airport and hold meetings with locals through a glass wall. Dominant Singapore Airlines Ltd. The government is in talks with several countries to set up air bubbles, including Hong Kong and Australia. Hungary has administered at least a first dose of vaccine to over 30% of its population. Yet daily infection levels remain high and virus mortality is among the highest in Europe. Although foreigners are still barred from entry for personal travel, the Eastern European country has kept its open borders for the transit of goods. With air capacity 92% below 2019 levels, the government looks forward to welcoming football fans in June to the Euro 2021 football tournament. – With help from Marton Eder, Kyunghee Park, Corinne Gretler and Layan Odeh. Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE .



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Global air transport stuck behind 2019 level, capacity at 58% of pre-Covid capacity | Instant News



Airlines just can’t fly the world again. Despite an American vaccine boom, many countries are battling the resurgence of a coronavirus. This means carriers are now expected to end 2021 offering around two-thirds of the number of seats they occupied in 2019. Passenger demand could be even lower. Globally, planned capacity is stuck at around 58% of pre-pandemic levels, says John Grant, chief analyst at OAG, aviation data specialist. For every market that grows, another seems to retreat, he said. Using weekly updates from the OAG, Bloomberg built a global flight tracking system to monitor the pulse of returning air travel. It’s not something Grant expects to be quick. The measurement of the seats offered shows that carriers currently have 62 million seats per week, well below the 2019 benchmark of 106 million. While not as accurate a measure as actual passenger traffic, tracking available seats can help identify trends, ideally giving readers a quick overview of what’s going on globally, regional or national. As the lockdowns mean hopes for a vibrant European summer season are on the line, Grant says the reality is that airline capacity will average around 65-68 million seats by the end of the year. – with a demand from late passengers of about 15 to 20%. points behind capacity levels “for a long time”. “There might be light at the end of the tunnel, but it’s a very, very long tunnel that we still have to go through. What’s Going on in Air Travel This Week OAG snapshot data for the week of April 12 shows the United States is gaining momentum, with a handful of accessible destinations in the Caribbean enjoying a recent recovery. Besides Cancun in Mexico, airlines have flown Americans to the U.S. Virgin Islands, where capacity is up 36% from 2019, Puerto Rico, up 0.5%, and St. the Grenadines, where last week’s volcanic eruption is likely to wipe out a Gain of 13%. Discount carriers in the United States have increased capacity as rising vaccination rates encourage leisure travel. Frontier Group Holdings Inc. and Spirit Airlines Inc. have been the most aggressive, focusing on flights just before spring break – although their push was halted last week. Despite US growth, Asia leads the world. China offers 5.1% more seats than in the same week in 2019. Vietnam is still closed to foreigners, but domestic tourism means flight capacity is almost back to where it was. two years ago. A similar dynamic is at play in India, where available seats are down by only 16%. In Europe, the regional hops that epitomize summer travel are almost dormant, with countries like Italy, France and Germany stuck at 25% or less of pre-pandemic levels. A surprising development is the handful of bright spots in Africa. The Democratic Republic of the Congo leads with 41% more than pre-pandemic activity. International borders have been open since August in the vast Central African country which is layered in the rainforest. War-ravaged Yemen in the Middle East is another outlier, with capacity offered at 19% above 2019 levels. While Yemenis cannot fly to many countries, airlines have reintroduced routes to Sudan and Ethiopia, where it is easier to obtain visas. No region is back to 2019 levels China quickly brought Covid-19 under control and kept infections low. Yet while this continues to help air travel to Asia outperform the rest of the world, even that is not enough to see the region restore its dormant capacity since 2019. Asia’s return was briefly interrupted by the Lunar New Year break in February, when the Chinese government encouraged people not to travel, according to data from the OAG. The recovery has since resumed. although the pace has flattened in recent weeks. North America experienced a shock in early March, due to the spring break and a powerful vaccine rollout in the United States. This is expected to continue after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this month authorized a return to recreational travel for those vaccinated. An increase in infections in the Midwest, which has propelled virus cases in the United States to a two-week high, is clouding the outlook. Europe is far behind all other regions. A multitude of factors are at play, ranging from the heavy reliance on international flights – which makes crossing borders difficult – to the emergence of new strains of the virus and setbacks in the European Union’s vaccination campaign . The UK, which has been the most successful in reducing infections, has avoided the May 17 target date for reopening international air travel, but says it is still a target. Domestic travel may offset gloom United Airlines Holdings Inc., whose normal route network is weighted to international travel, remains stuck at nearly 50% below normal. The Chicago-based carrier has focused on matching capacity to demand, so planes will fly more fully. Delta Air Lines Inc., another major global carrier, will have more room for passengers on May 1, when it becomes the last U.S. airline to lift its block on the sale of mid-size seats. While international travel remains phased out, some large countries are supported by domestic carriers, which have been able to continue to fly where rail or car travel is less convenient. Airlines in China and India continue to accept single-aisle jet deliveries from Airbus SE. Vietnam, about 1,000 miles north to south, has also recovered well, with scheduled capacity down just 5.2% from 2019. Yet Singapore and Hong Kong, both reliant on international travel, barely fly. Progress towards establishing flight lanes has been hampered by outbreaks of the virus, despite a low number of cases compared to Western countries. In Malaysia, where capacity is 85% lower than 2019 levels, AirAsia Group Bhd. Recorded a record loss in the last quarter of 2020 after local lockdowns delayed its plan to resume limited operations. What happens after? As U.S. airlines bring back pilots on leave, the coming weeks will show whether the March rebound can be sustained. Rising Covid-19 cases in this country means the outlook for carriers is becoming less clear, according to analyst Helane Becker of Cowen & Co. Vaccination rates will be key to lifting travel restrictions in the coming months . This week alone, Johnson & Johnson’s coronavirus vaccine rollout became the latest to hit roadblocks, as the US halted use of the vaccine and its European rollout delayed after reports of rare cases of blood clotting . Questions have also been raised about the effectiveness of some Chinese vaccines. “It’s very difficult globally to see that there will be enough vaccinations by the end of 2021 or even 2022,” Grant said of the OAG. “It almost makes air travel a luxury item.



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Britain’s slow return to travel threatened by Covid surge in Europe | Instant News


UK authorities are drawing up plans for the temporary return of international travel, allowing families to book vacations and providing a desperately needed lifeline for the aviation industry. But the resurgence of the coronavirus in Europe is forcing Boris Johnson’s government to consider delaying the reopening of overseas travel beyond the proposed May 17 start date, sources familiar with the matter said. April 5. However, officials from 10 government departments and agencies are still working on the plan because the issues are so thorny, people said. Airlines are pushing for flights to resume in time to take advantage of a substantial part of the summer season, which accounts for the bulk of revenue for leisure carriers such as Ryanair Holdings Plc and EasyJet Plc and tour operators like TUI AG. After a washout in 2020, new strains of the virus and a chaotic vaccine rollout in the European Union have already dashed hopes of a solid start to the warmer months of this year. is to introduce a new system from May 17 but to strictly limit travel to countries with the lowest virus rates. Some members of the government are pushing for the current ban on overseas travel to continue beyond May. Other officials fear the worsening impact on employment in the tourism and travel sectors, which have been among the hardest hit by the lockdown. Henry Smith, MP for Johnson’s ruling Conservative Party, said said unemployment was nearly 9% in his constituency contains London’s Gatwick Airport, compared to a national average of around 5%. “If we were to see a further delay in international travel it would kill the industry for this year,” Smith said in an interview. “It would be catastrophic for aviation. The industry needs date certainty, you can’t turn aviation on and off like a light switch. Traffic lights Under the proposed system being developed by officials, countries will be coded according to the levels of risk in a so-called traffic light. Countries with the worst viral situation would be redlisted and hit with travel bans, while those with the fewest cases would be coded green and open to theft. The government’s Global Travel Working Group is led by Secretary of Transportation Grant Shapps and includes ministers. and officials from other departments, such as Health, who would be much more cautious about a reopening travel schedule. Wales Premier Mark Drakeford said on Thursday he hoped Johnson would push back the May 17 date the government has set as the first on which international travel can potentially resume. ‘does not reflect the risk of reimporting the coronavirus from other parts of the world where new variants are in circulation,’ Drakeford told ITV’s GMB program. France provides evidence of “how close some of these risks are to this country,” Drakeford said. Heathrow Airport CEO John Holland-Kaye has expressed optimism that international travel will allow a summer vacation to many countries by July. It launched a four-color traffic light system that would include two levels of medium risk, allowing more people to travel based on Covid testing and proof of vaccination. won’t get a definitive list of countries you can go to, but I think we’ll have a risk-based approach, ”Holland-Kaye said in an interview with Times Radio. “Then I think from May 17 we will have countries that open up – the first travel lanes established without quarantine, so people can meet friends, go and do business.” Before he’s here, it’s on the Bloomberg terminal. LEARN MORE .



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U.S. air travel hits highest level since March 2020 | Instant News


WASHINGTON: Airports in the United States welcomed their largest number of passengers in a year on Friday (March 12), data showed, following a simmering travel halt caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. at US airports on Friday, the most since March 15 of last year, according to figures from the Transportation Safety Administration. Despite the recovery, the volume is still close to half of what it would normally be at this time of year, the highest since the start of the coronavirus crisis was seen on January 3, with almost 1, 33 million passengers. On April 14, the United States was struck by the world’s largest reported outbreak of the virus, with some 534,000 deaths. Advertisement Advertisement However, the country has administered more than 100 million doses of the vaccine and the number of new cases has fallen from its peaks during the holiday season. .



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Japan Air Force Commander Allows To Travel To All Tokyo As Virus Numbers Decline – Pacific | Instant News


TOKYO – The commander of Yokota Air Base on Tuesday lifted the coronavirus ban on out-of-service travel to the most popular areas of the Japanese capital and reduced the period of restriction of movement for vaccinated travelers. Shibuya, Shinjuku, and Roppongi, known for their crowded streets, shops, restaurants, and nightlife, are once again open to people associated with Yokota, the headquarters west of Tokyo of US Japanese forces, 5th Air Force. and the 374th Airlift Wing. The order applies to anyone with access to the base, including service members, civilian Defense Ministry employees, family members, and Japanese employees. Yokota of all US facilities in Japan had the most liberal out-of-service travel policy in the pandemic, essentially allowing its staff to travel to anywhere in the country except central Tokyo. Even that ban was lifted on February 22 by base commander Col. Andrew Campbell to include only the three central districts. These areas were once considered coronavirus hotspots, responsible for the city’s highest infection rates. However, the ban on frequenting bars and nightclubs, karaoke and social clubs, “or any establishment with the potential for crowds, close contacts or closed spaces where COVID prevention measures cannot be maintained Is still valid, according to a reissued public health decree. Tuesday by Campbell. Dining in non-base restaurants in Tokyo, Kanagawa, Saitama and Chiba prefectures is also prohibited until March 21. Other measures, including masks, social distancing and frequent hand washing, are still mandatory. Also on Tuesday, Campbell slashed the time newcomers and returning travelers to Japan who are vaccinated against COVID-19 must switch to restricted movement, a form of quarantine imposed on travelers to curb the spread of the coronavirus. This is the first significant easing of post-travel quarantine measures announced at a U.S. base in Japan since they took effect at the request of the Japanese government last year. Instead of 14 days of essentially isolated “movement restriction” at home, eligible travelers can spend seven days at home followed by seven days during which they are allowed on base, but not in the surrounding community, according to the report. Campbell’s order. Change comes with reservations. Travelers must be fully vaccinated at least 14 days before arriving in Japan, they must provide proof of their vaccinated status and remain free from symptoms of COVID-19. They cannot walk, cycle or use public transportation between their home and the base during the past seven days. Further restrictions are set out in Campbell’s order. His order also creates a “working ROM” status in which vaccinated service members and qualified civilians can report for work for the first seven days after arriving in Japan. In the “working ROM”, vaccinated people should be separated from unvaccinated workers and should be tested free of the virus on or after the fifth day, depending on the order. Other restrictions apply. Even restricted travel for unvaccinated individuals is reduced to 10 days, followed by four days on the facility, according to the order. They too should remain symptom-free and be tested virus-free on or after day 8. Elsewhere, the daily report of new coronavirus cases at U.S. bases in Japan was relatively light, and U.S. forces in Korea had not announced any new patients as of 6 p.m. Tuesday. Four people from Yokosuka Naval Base have contracted COVID-19 since Friday and were the only new cases reported by the U.S. military in Japan as of 6 p.m. Tuesday. All four have recently arrived in Japan, according to a Facebook post. Yokosuka Naval Hospital is monitoring a total of seven patients. Tokyo on Tuesday reported 290 more people infected with the coronavirus, according to public broadcaster NHK. That’s the highest number of new patients in a day since 316 on March 3, according to metropolitan government data. About 250 people on average contract the virus each day, according to the seven-day moving average. South Korea reported 427 newly infected people on Monday, including 98 in Seoul and 181 in Gyeonggi province, where the US’s largest base, Camp Humphreys, and Osan Air Base are located, according to the Korea Agency. disease control and prevention. A week ago, Gyeonggi reported 218 new cases of coronavirus and Seoul reported 116. In Guam, the governor on Tuesday announced that the risk of travel to island territory had been lowered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of Level 4 to Level 3. People should avoid all travel to destinations on Level 4, according to CDC. They should avoid non-essential travel to Level 3 destinations. “While we still have a lot of work to do to further reduce our risk, we are confident in our progress on Operation Liberate Guam, our campaign to to vaccinate at least 80% of our adult population by July, ”Governor Lou Leon Guerrero said in a press release. As of Monday, Guam, a population of 159,000, had reported a pandemic total of 7,751 coronavirus cases and 133 related deaths. Stars and Stripes reporter Yoo Kyong Chang contributed to this report. [email protected] Twitter: @JosephDitzler.



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