Tag Archives: Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz

Morning Update: Piles of Canadian emergency personal protective equipment are not prepared for a pandemic | Instant News


Good morning,

Canadian emergency stocks are billed as “insurance policies” for the province, and resources are subject to change by local authorities when they face a surge in demand. But before the COVID-19 pandemic, supplies of vital personal protective equipment in emergency supplies managed by the federal government is a small part of what is needed, according to new information obtained by The Globe and Mail.

The federal agency does not have a target for the level of personal protective equipment that must be maintained in the pile, does not know what level of inventory the province and region have and does not inform the lower level government of how much to store.

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Personal protective equipment seen at the intensive care unit COVID-19 at St. Hospital. Paul in downtown Vancouver, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS / Jonathan Hayward

JONATHAN HAYWARD / The Canadian Press

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The search continues for five missing Canadians, one killed in a military helicopter crash

That incident shake the Canadian military and the naval and air base in Halifax where HMCS Fredericton and the CH-148 Cyclone helicopter are located. The crew took part in training exercises with Italian and Turkish ships at the time of the accident.

The Canadian Armed Forces said Thursday that Sub-Lieutenant Abbigail Cowbrough, a 23-year-old marine systems engineering officer on the frigate of the HMCS aircraft carrier Fredericton, was killed in an accident off the coast of Greece.

Clockwise from top left: Killed was Sub-Lieutenant Abbigail Cowbrough, a Marine Systems Engineering Officer, originally from Toronto, Ontario. The missing confirmed were: Corporal Corporal Master Corporal, Electronic Air Sensor Operator; Sub-Lieutenant Matthew Pyke, Naval War Officer; Captain Brenden Ian MacDonald, Pilot; Captain Kevin Hagen, Pilot and Captain Maxime Miron-Morin, Air Combat System Officer. Ministry of National Defense

With the permission of the Ministry of National Defense


MPs chose to call a key WHO adviser after the global body refused to let him testify

Commons health committee elects use powers that are rarely used support the motion to call on World Health Organization adviser Bruce Aylward to appear before the committee after the organization refused to allow him to testify before MPs about how it responded to the pandemic.

The WHO faces questions about its relationship with China and whether the organization informs and prepares the world properly for the corona virus that causes COVID-19.

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Back to business

Alberta will allow some businesses to reopen on May 14 but only if a series of public health measures are taken at that time. Next week, Alberta will continue non-urgent operations and allow medical services such as dentists to open. The province will also lift most restrictions on provincial parks, camping, golf and other outdoor activities.

QuebecProvincial government plans to reopen the school and retail stores in front of most other provinces. Premier Fran├žois Legault said that if the public health authority determined that the city’s hospitals could not cope with an increase in cases that would eventually be accompanied by easing restrictions, he would delay his plans.

Ontario Prime Minister Doug Ford said the province was on track to reopen the economy, as its government released 65 safety guidelines for businesses, including office space, restaurants and the automotive industry. Sector by sector guidelines include measures such as ensuring physical distance, installing Plexiglas barriers, increasing air flow, and proper sanitation practices.

Liberals began to break their promises to buy back ‘all’ assault weapons in Canada

The government would otherwise permit the current owner to sell their weapons to the government or keep them under the grandfather’s process. Under grandfather, the sale of new weapons will be stopped, but the current owner will be allowed to store weapons that are prohibited under certain conditions – a move enraged both parties weapons control debate.

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ALSO IN OUR RADAR

Ottawa is expected to announce the new Bank of Canada governor on Friday: Senior government sources, who are not authorized to speak publicly about this issue, said the cabinet has decided on a new one the central bank governor but will not give further details.

Insurers said it was not responsible for completing Bondfield renovations: Zurich Insurance Co. Ltd., which guaranteed complete project St. Michael, through an insurance contract known as a surety bond, has asked the Ontario court to decide that his obligation to pay for the construction of the hospital is now canceled, court records show.

The judge sided with Ottawa in the case of Quebec men accused of crimes against humanity in the former Yugoslavia: The government accuses the man obtained fraudulently Canadian citizenship by hiding its role in the creation and operation of police forces who committed violations on behalf of the Republic of Bosnia of Bosnia that was proclaimed in the early 1990s.

Chief hereditary Wet’suwet endorsed an agreement for negotiations on accelerated rights, a degree in B.C. traditional region: Wet’suweten leaders have invited federal Crown-Indigenous Relations Ministers Carolyn Bennett and Scott Fraser, B.C. Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation, for signed a memorandum of understanding on the 14th of May.


MORNING MARKET

World stocks fall further after China Trump’s tariff threat: Stock of the world pulled back even further on Friday on downbeat US economic data, mixed company results and President Donald Trump’s threat to impose new tariffs on China over the coronavirus crisis. Britain’s FTSE 100 is down 2.25 percent just before 6am. In Asia, Tokyo’s Nikkei ended down 2.84 percent. Markets in parts of Europe and Asia are closed for public holidays. New York futures are weaker. The Canadian dollar is trading at 71.25 US cents.

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WHAT IS EVERYONE THAT TALKS ABOUT

We must be proud of the WHO pandemic response

Peter A. Singer: “Weakening this organization at this time would be like tying one hand behind the back of a surgeon in the middle of an operation.” Singer, OC, is a special advisor to Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the World Health Organization.

Canadians are exposed to gas in China

Robyn Urback: “Canadian officials can acknowledge the obvious, while still insisting we focus on acute domestic problems for now.”

Don’t let Saudi Arabia’s whip ban divert attention from the repression that still exists

Irwin Cotler: “Canada must call for the release of Raif Badawi during Ramadan, allowing her to reunite with her family in Quebec.” Cotler is chairman of the Human Rights Center Raoul Wallenberg and former Canadian justice minister and attorney general.

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TODAY’S EDITORIAL CARTOON

Brian Gable

Brian Gable / The Globe and Mail


BETTER LIFE

The last few weeks have been terrible – marathons in doom and gloom and anxiety. Then for this edition of Full Stream Ahead, this is a pure escape full of action and pure.

  • When Cravings: Get some silly and hot with Fast & Furious Prizes: Hobbs & Shaw, but maybe ignore parts of the film that revolve around deadly viruses.
  • On Netflix: In Mission: Impossible – Fallout, Tom Cruise is a film star’s platonic ideals. He is also the next generation of humans, a manifestation of life that breathes with pure determination.
  • On Amazon Prime Video: It’s broad, angry, rude and dating … and also very fun. Watch Soldiers If you had somehow walked all this time without witnessing the sensation of the classic game house from the 1979 city war Walter Hill.

TIME IN TIME: May 1, 1939

May 1939 edition, featuring the first appearance of comic artist comic artist Bob Kane (AP Photo)

The Associated Press

Batman first appeared, on page Detective Comics # 27

Superheroes rarely come to a fully formed world. At the time of their 1963 Marvel comic book debut, X-Men looked like thrifty trick-or-treaters in stores. The first appearance of Iron Man in the same year was not too similar to Tony Stark who wore the red and yellow suits we know and loved, but walked giant, talking cans. But Batman arrived 81 years ago looking exactly like the Dark Knight of today’s culture. In its appearance on the Detective Comics page No. 27, the world’s greatest detective made a direct impression, from his iconic veil to Bruce Wayne’s alter-ego to his giving and receiving relationships with Gotham City Commissioner James Gordon. However, there is absolutely no one – not even Ra’s al Ghul, Batman’s most intelligent enemy – who can foresee the ultimate dominance of vigilant culture, which now includes several television series, eight films (not including animated versions, or animated versions of Lego ), billions of dollars in merchandise, and a pretty good Prince album. Barry Hertz

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Bank of Canada Leaves Key Interest Rate Unchanged | Instant News


OTTAWA – The Canadian bank left its main interest rate unchanged Wednesday and said it will start buying provincial and corporate bonds, warning that the short-term decline in output in the Canadian economy could be the biggest on record.

Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz said at a press conference the Canadian economy experienced “significant and rapid contraction” as a result of the new coronavirus pandemic, which has led to widespread business closures, and a decline in global oil prices. “In the near future, policy …

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