Tag Archives: beach

Urgent attention as ‘destructive’ storm will hit NZ; West Coast in the firing line | Instant News


Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

A storm that is likely to bring destructive winds and swells is centered on New Zealand’s West Coast, prompting warnings for those camping, on foot or on the water.

Weatherwatch.co.nz estimates strong winds “damaging” more than 150 km / h, waves of up to 13 meters, and one meter of snow in the Southern Alps.

There may also be over 200 mm of rain for parts of the West Coast.

Police say they have not issued a specific warning for the storm, but they always urge motorists to drive according to the conditions.

“In wet and windy weather that means slowing down and increasing the distance to follow,” said a spokesman.

Philip Duncan at weatherwatch.co.nz said the storm would be significant.

Weather and wind action today.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Weather and wind action today. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

“The stormy Southern Ocean weather pattern is temporarily putting the La Nina pattern to one side with two significant lows – one today and the other around Tuesday, Wednesday.

“Sunday’s low, which still hasn’t suppressed some thunderstorms, rain and winds for parts of New Zealand, will actually be tracing out of the country today. So we don’t expect anything too serious today, although it remains up-to-date with possible MetService severe warning no matter where you are. “

Estimated wind speed on Monday evening at 7pm.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Estimated wind speed on Monday evening at 7pm. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

But the ensuing storm worries Duncan, especially for those venturing outdoors.

“The Tuesday / Wednesday event appears to be the most intense with the epicenter of this hurricane potentially crossing Southland and Otago.”

As a hurricane hits the country with its strong northwest strong winds, it will then be followed by a cool southern turn with heavy rains that will hit the West Coast.

Weather and wind types are expected on Tuesday at 13.00.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Weather and wind types are expected on Tuesday at 13.00. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Auckland is expected to cool down but will not experience as violent a storm as the South Island one.

MetService meteorologist Peter Little said southwestern changes that begin on Wednesday through Thursday will bring temperatures down to 10C on the South Island.

Dunedin will drop from 25C today to 15C.

Few say that temperature changes won’t be as dramatic as on the North Island, but people will definitely feel the impact from the southwest.

Auckland will drop from 27C today to 21C on Wednesday, and 20C on Thursday.

Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Until then, the hot weather will continue. Whangārei and Gisborne can expect temperatures of 30C, Auckland and Tauranga 27C and Hamilton 26C.

In today’s South Island, Kaikoura is a hot spot of 28C. Christchurch and Ashburton are set at 27C.

The front exerts its energies on the South Island, and central New Zealand – Wellington, Wairarapa – is bearing the brunt of strong winds. Bad weather warning has been issued.

Meanwhile, warnings were in place tonight for the Canterbury Plains and North Otago, where it is expected to see more than 25 mm of rain, along with hail.

MetService has warned people to be prepared for flash floods around low-lying areas such as rivers, streams or narrow valleys, which can cause slipping.

Driving conditions will also be dangerous, with surface flooding and poor visibility during heavy rain.

Heavy hail can cause significant damage to crops, orchards, vines, greenhouses and vehicles.

-RNZ additional reporting

Wind gusts speed early Monday.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Wind gusts speed early Monday. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

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New Zealand’s best beaches: hidden gems | Instant News


Travel

Whale’s Bay, Tutukaka. Photo / Melinda Legg

The results are in! Today, our finalists are announced: 13 stunning Kiwi beaches chosen by you and the Travel team. Click here to see the result, and read about our 10 most popular beaches, and our three favorite wild cards.

But every New Zealander knows that some of our best stretches of sand are the hard to reach, the lesser known and the hidden gems.

Here are some of our favorite entries from readers who favored Aotearoa’s calmer coastline.

Don’t miss your chance to be crowned New Zealand’s Best Beach 2021. Please visit nzherald.co.nz/bestbeach to vote for your favorite from our finalists.

Pukehina Beach, Bay of Plenty

Pukehina Beach is the “hidden gem” of the Eastern Bay of Plenty coast. Outside of peak season, this small town of 200 people is a tightly knit community of fishermen and women, retirees and tangata whenua connected to the great Arawa waka. Beautiful beaches and beaches remind us of the old days. Many homes have been passed down from generation to generation, converted with just a touch of paint, perhaps a new deck. The cousins ​​slept all night in a bed that also housed longboards, surfcasters and kayaks. Aunts can be seen gathering kaimoana in the estuary, nannas and pop their fur babies for walks along the beach and meeting the local uncle – Hippi Pippi. From stunning sunsets to ever-changing coastal landscapes and a micro-climate of its own, Pukehina Beach with its soft white sand and turquoise waters is a truly unique Aotearoa beach experience.

Amber Stevens

Pukehina, Bay of Plenty.  Photo / Amber Stevens
Pukehina, Bay of Plenty. Photo / Amber Stevens

New Chums Beach, Coromandel Peninsula

Over the last 20+ years I’ve traveled with family and then friends, lots of picnics, lots of beach days, nights out, and some beach cricket games. The fact that you can’t drive out there weed out the crowd, and walking on it itself is spectacular! This is truly a magical part of NZ

Natalie Lions

New Friend, Coromandel.  Photo / Natalie Lions
New Friend, Coromandel. Photo / Natalie Lions

Whale Bay Beach, Tutukaka Beach, Northland

A 10-minute walk along the cliff-side gives you stunning views of the coves around Whale Bay. Once you go down the trail the beach itself has clear blue water (almost like the Maldives). Beautiful trees perfect for hammocks and small swings provide seclusion and shade, and small rock pools on either side for exploration. Among the famous beaches but with warmer water, it is a hidden gem. It is a must.

Melinda Legg

Whale's Bay, Tutukaka.  Photo / Melinda Legg
Whale’s Bay, Tutukaka. Photo / Melinda Legg

Kariaotahi Beach, South Auckland

I’ve been lifeguard for this beach for eight seasons now and been a part of junior surfing since I was 7 years old (now 21). From the experiences I have had from this beach during my time as part of this wonderful community and nature, I can safely say that it is by far the best beach in Auckland and the country.

Taylor Harvey

Karioitahi Beach, South Auckland.  Photo / Taylor Harvey
Karioitahi Beach, South Auckland. Photo / Taylor Harvey

Amodeo Bay, Coromandel

Our special slice of heaven. We first came here on our honeymoon nearly 16 years ago and have never stopped returning. It is rugged and far enough away to be quiet, so not overcrowded, and has the most amazing sunsets, and the best fishing spots are not far from the coast. This is truly a Kiwi experience. There is a river flowed by the ocean where there are many pet eels that you can feed and pat with your hands. It is surrounded by native bush and on quiet nights you can hear kiwis.

Karen Bates

Amodeo Bay, Coromandel.  Photo / Karen Bates
Amodeo Bay, Coromandel. Photo / Karen Bates

Taupō Bay, Far North

It’s special for its size, location, stunning views and chill feel. It epitomizes everything we look for on a classic Kiwi beach – unobtrusive, never overcrowded, part of a magical coastline, just a simple beach has it all. We love it.

Todd Male

Bethells / Te Henga Beach

I nominated for the best beach in west Auckland, Bethells Beach / Te Henga. It is one of the calmest, rugged beaches that are beautifully reflected on those sunny days. Always have awesome sunsets, places to swim / surf / fish, walk along cliffs, on the dunes, along the beach, special wildlife, and people from all different walks of life. You also have access to Lake Wainamu which is a short walk from the beach and is spectacular with its massive sand dunes reflecting off the lake. This cafe serves unbeatable post beach food.

Luke Campbell

Jackson Bay, West Coast

On a beautiful sunny day, you can enjoy a beautiful wild beach and feel like you are the only person in the world – sunbathing, looking for rare pebbles on the beach, at night building a driftwood fire. Just say it! On a day with wild weather, it’s like you’re in another world – foggy, rocky and desolate. One of the best spots on the NZ coastline so far.

Felicity Lynchard

Thorne Bay Beach, North Coast

Beautiful beach at Waitematā Harbor. Golden sand, shade of trees along the coast, rock pools with fresh water flowing between the rocks from Lake Pupuke. Overlooking Rangitoto and north to Whangaparāoa. Coupled with steep rises on the water’s edge for swimming near shore and avoiding rowing too far to reach deep water. Accessible only by walking around the waterfront or via footpaths from Minhaha Street – no car access so it feels more remote and secluded, yet you are less than 10 km to downtown Auckland.

Kim Leuila

For more New Zealand travel ideas and inspiration, visit newzealand.com

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Why do so many sharks congregate on New Zealand’s coastlines | Instant News


The waters around New Zealand are teeming with apex ocean predators – and there’s hardly a stretch of coastline where you won’t encounter any shark species.

While about 66 species of sharks have been identified as living in the seas around us, there are about a dozen shark species that fishermen and swimmers often find.

Despite their terrifying appearance, only a handful, such as the great white, mako and hammerhead, pose a threat to human life.

Many species congregate in the warm waters of the upper North Island, from bronze whalers to blue sharks, makos, giant manta rays and school sharks.

Around the South Island, generally harmless species such as spiny dogfish, school sharks and blue sharks make marine habitats their home.

Several species such as the hammerhead, blue shark, and spiny dogfish are common in all coastal waters.

But by far one of the most dangerous stretches of coastline in the country is in the deep south, where the immature great whites, with their distinctive white bellies, live.

Considered the deadliest and most dangerous of all sharks, great white sharks are found around both islands, with young sharks preferring warmer northern waters. Adults can be found in southern waters near seal colonies.

The Department of Conservation says New Zealand is a global hotspot for this species along with waters of California, South Africa, Australia and Japan.

The apex predator, which can grow up to 7 meters long, is the greatest threat to humans and is the fish responsible for the greatest unprovoked attacks.

Since 1888 there have been five fatal attacks and 13 people injured off the coast of Otago, Southland and Stewart Island.

Over the past 170 years, 13 people have died in shark attacks across New Zealand.

The death toll increased last week when 19-year-old Kaelah Marlow was attacked by a shark, which is thought to be a great white shark, at the end of Bowentown, Waihi Beach.

The Department of Conservation says encounters with large sharks in coastal waters usually occur during the spring and summer, when many species move ashore to feed and feed.

With recent sparkling summer conditions, sharks have been seen approaching the shore for fun in the cool conditions.

Dozens of bronze whalers – about 2.5 meters in size – and about half a dozen hammerhead sharks have in recent days been seen swimming in the sparkling waters off Matarangi Beach on the Coromandel.

At the same time, hundreds of swimmers were forced out of the sea twice over the weekend when several sharks were spotted on Pauanui Beach.

Surf Life Saving New Zealand national SAR manager Allan Mundy said the increase in sightings was understandable given conditions at the beach but did not cause panic.

“We saw more sharks than we normally see,” he told RNZ.

“But if we look at what’s really happening on the beach, we have clear water right now, there are no very big waves yet, so the visibility in the water is very good and we see more people on the beach, walking and swimming, because of the Covid effect. . “

He said the fact that sharks were spotted along the coast shouldn’t cause concern because the predators – mostly bronze whalers and thresher sharks – were just sailing and not foraging, he said.

“They pretty much did what we would do, enjoying the warm water, sunbathing and sailing. There are no real food sources along the surf beaches.

“These sharks forage in the sea or in ports, where there is lots and lots of food … If they hunt, they are in stealth mode.”

Clinton Duffy, a marine scientist with the Department of Conservation, previously told the Herald that many people have the wrong perception of sharks that are rare in our waters. But that’s not the case.

However, attacks are rare but one should always swim between the flags, and never alone on an unattended beach.

“For the most part, sharks are completely uninterested in humans, I’ve seen them themselves swim past people … not at all interested.”

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Waihī shark attack: The beach reopens for swimmers after a teenager dies in a shark attack | Instant News


New Zealand

A description of the fatal shark encounter that took place in New Zealand, and some expert advice from Surf Lifesaving NZ.

Waihī Beach has been reopened for swimmers, days after a teenager died from a shark attack.

A rāhui was imposed on the coast, 58 km north of Tauranga, after Kaelah Marlow died on Thursday.

The 19-year-old was injured by a shark while swimming at the end of Bowentown on the beach at around 5pm.

It is understood that the teenager was pulled from the water alive and paramedics desperately performed CPR on the beach, but could not save his life.

Kaelah Marlow, 19, from Hamilton died on Waihī Beach on Thursday.  It is thought he was the victim of a shark attack.  Photo / Provided
Kaelah Marlow, 19, from Hamilton died on Waihī Beach on Thursday. It is thought he was the victim of a shark attack. Photo / Provided

Further 73km to the north, Pāuanui Beach was closed and swimmers were told to get out of the water after seeing the sharks yesterday afternoon.

Surf Lifesavers ordered everyone – nearly 500 people – to stay on the beach by 1pm. They were still not allowed to enter the water at 3:30 p.m.

Patrols have found sharks on the popular Coromandel coast, and swimmers can only return to the water when 30 minutes have passed since the last confirmed sighting, a lifeguard said.

Rāhui on Waihī Beach is appointed for swimmers, hikers, and those who take part in other water activities – except fishing or seafood gathering – after hui Fridays among local parents, club officials, Bay of Plenty harbor chiefs, Surf Lifesaving New Zealand and representative of the Western Bay of Plenty District Council.

Rāhui, which runs along the coast from the northern end of Waihī Beach to Bowentown Heads, and includes ports to Ōngare, Tuapiro and Tanners Pt,
stay in place until 7:00 am Friday for those who want to fish or collect seafood.

Banning is customary after the water tragedy, said Māori warden and chairman of the Otawhiwhi Marae Trust Shaan Kingi.

Witnesses to Thursday’s tragedy described a heartbreaking scene, with a man being comforted by emergency services and then, after Marlow’s death, walking overboard and splashing water on himself.

“I can’t stop thinking about the tremendous sadness I saw on his face as he left the beach,” said eyewitness Matt Lawry.

People arrive at Waihī Beach all Friday to pay their respects to Kaelah Marlow.  Photo / George Novak
People arrive at Waihī Beach all Friday to pay their respects to Kaelah Marlow. Photo / George Novak

Marlow, who lived in Western Australia until moving to New Zealand five years ago with her parents and younger sister, is “a cute, lovely girl, always cheerful,” her aunt Kylie French told Western Australia.

He lives in Hamilton and has worked on a farm having previously studied a trade apprenticeship.

“I’m just in shock, everyone’s in shock. We can’t go there, Mum can’t,” French said.

“You hear about shark attacks, but never in a million years did you think it would become someone you knew.”

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A post-mortem examination was carried out on Friday, and it is not yet certain if any sharks were behind the attack.

Clinton Duffy, a marine scientist with the Department of Conservation, said many people have the wrong perception that sharks are unusual in New Zealand.

They do not.

However, attacks are rare – he has counted only 14 fatalities since 1840 – but one must always swim between the flags, and never alone on an unpatched beach.

Swimming should also be avoided at night, and where people are fishing or fishing.

High concentrations of fish in the water or the presence of dolphins can also indicate the presence of sharks.

“For the most part, sharks are completely uninterested in humans, I’ve seen them themselves swim past people … not at all interested.”

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New Zealand’s best beaches – how to nominate your favorites | Instant News


Wainui Beach, Gisborne. Photo / J Dobson

Don’t miss your chance to nominate your favorite stretch of sand in our search for New Zealand’s Best Beaches 2021

We’re looking for the best beaches in New Zealand and we need your help. We want you to nominate your favorites, tell us why you love this beach and what makes it so special. Send us a photo of your favorite beach, too, and we’ll profile some of your entries over the summer. But hurry up, the nominations close at midnight [Sunday, January 10].

From there, your entries will be counted and the top 10 beaches will be named as our finalists, with the bonus of three wildcard entries chosen by the Herald Travel team.
You can then select one beach from the top 13 beaches to be crowned the ultimate winner.

Meanwhile, here are some of the nominees so far. Don’t see your favorite here? Vote below, or open nzherald.co.nz/bestbeach

May the best beaches win!

Matarangi Beach, Coromandel

This is one of the few beaches that are truly north facing in New Zealand with fine white sand, beautiful clear water. There is a wide variety of sea conditions for all – young shallow swimmers, ocean swimmers, boogie boarders, surfers, kite surfers, paddle surfers. The beach is never overcrowded and apart from that you can often see dolphins passing by.
Sally Waters

Kaiteriteri Beach, Nelson Tasman

I think Kaiteriteri beach is one of the best in New Zealand, known for its unique golden sand and crystal clear waters. An ideal and popular summer spot, it has everything you need for an action-packed day, from sailing, kayaking, bicycle tours and more. Even better, Kaiteriteri has more beautiful and unique beaches that are all located next to each other.
Yulan Black

Aramoana, Dunedin

Pumps up the surf, there’s awesome wildlife (sea lions and penguins) and some really cool cliffs and rocks.
Felix Page

Bark Bay, Abel Tasman National Park

It’s secluded (you have to get there by hiking or by boat), has a sloping white sand beach, with clear, sheltered sea water and deep enough to swim. It’s also supported by a national park, so it’s 99 percent natural.
Zoe Cromwell

Mangawhai Surf Beach, Northland

Mangawhai Surf Beach, Northland.  Photo / John Anggot
Mangawhai Surf Beach, Northland. Photo / John Anggot

Mangawhai is truly magical because the sunsets are amazing, you can surf, you can walk on the cliffs to see amazing bird’s eye views from places that cannot be caught on camera, there is local dune protection. Everyone must experience the Mangawhai miracle.

John Anggot

Cable Bay in Doubtless Bay, Northland

There’s an ice cream shop there, golden sand, blue water, happy people – the perfect place.
Parry Jay

Ruakaka, Northland

Ruakaka Beach, Northland.  Photo / Koby Jonas
Ruakaka Beach, Northland. Photo / Koby Jonas

Soft white sand and clear clear water that stretches for miles make this beach our favorite. Ice cream in “the chilly bin” after a day in the sun is a bonus.
Koby Jonas

Campbells Bay, Kakanui, Waitaki

Campbell Bay, Waitaki.  Photo / Sarah Hailes
Campbell Bay, Waitaki. Photo / Sarah Hailes

It’s great for families, surfers, and dog-friendly. This can keep you busy or treat you as your only friend. Take a walk to All Day Bay and back, or try a small kite. I like it.
Sarah Hailes

Matapouri Beach, Northland

Matapouri Beach, Northland.  Photo / Mark Gibson
Matapouri Beach, Northland. Photo / Mark Gibson

This beach has soft sand, warm water, and small waves perfect for swimming and body boarding. Ample parking makes it easy to prepare for a long day at the beach.
Anushree Sen Gupta

Kano Beach, on Mapoutahi in Otago

Canoe Beach has it all – beautiful for a walk with your dog, caves to walk through at low tide, rope swings, history, pā to hike and watch surfers, lovely long beaches to walk along the other side of the headland. Kano Beach is also great for swimming as it’s sheltered – you can kayak around to Osborne bay, and now there’s even a local brewery in Waitati. Nothing is missing.
Amanda Church

Wainui Beach, Gisborne

Wainui not only greets the sun before anywhere else on mainland New Zealand, it also has a fun and nurturing community, incredible waves and beautiful clear water. There is a rock pool at each end with interesting creatures. The Okitu shop, about half way down, has excellent summer food and the most friendly staff.
J Dobson

Castlepoint, Wairarapa

Castlepoint is a superb coastal formation with a variety of coastal experiences. Wild surfing and calm and safe lagoons. Stunning rock forms, lighthouses and sand dunes. Great fishing, swimming, surfing and kayaking. Stunning views and walking opportunities. Sitting under the lighthouse after dark is also a real experience. This is an authentic Kiwi beach and bach environment, with an annual horse race on the beach.
Melissa de Souza-Correa

Wharariki Beach, Golden Bay

Wharariki Beach, Golden Bay.  Photo / Patel Veerick
Wharariki Beach, Golden Bay. Photo / Patel Veerick

Wharariki only cut Mataī Bay and Castlepoint Northland for me. The three of them were very beautiful. But Wharariki won because it had exposed rocks like Cathedral Cove, providing a unique sight to behold. Has a rock pool for baby seals to swim and play. The distance is far away, which adds to its charm. There is plenty of room for multiple people to enjoy at once. Good surf. You need to take a short walk to access it, which might be considered negative, but people who tend to make an effort to reach it are less likely to litter and wreck the place. There are lots of walks, which can also expose you to a variety of wildlife.
Patel Veerick

Cathedral Cove, Coromandel

Cathedral Cove, Coromandel.  Photo / Mahdi Algargoosh
Cathedral Cove, Coromandel. Photo / Mahdi Algargoosh

Cathedral Cove is a slice of heaven. There are stunning walks to the beach, pristine clear water, waves and waterfalls. It doesn’t get much better than this.
Mahdi Algargoosh |

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