Tag Archives: because

The romantic stories of New Zealand Bachelor and Bachelor contestants unfold | Instant News


I mean … LOOK at those smiles of love! Video / TVNZ

I’m not going to ramble on here because you’ve suffered enough – so let me kick off this “After Party” recap by saying, Shivani and Paul are the cutest couple I have ever seen.

And now that I’ve dropped the bomb, let’s discuss it.

Shivani and Paul walked out into the mansion’s grounds together and at once my partner’s radar buzzed. Apparently so is Art’s eye candy because she pulled the suspicious happy couple over for a chat and that’s when the treasure chest of love is FINALLY opened, folks.

Love is in the air, and the two are nowhere to be found.
Love is in the air, and the two are nowhere to be found.

“I heard through the grapevine that you guys have been hanging out.” Art started the conversation and immediately the two lovebirds started giggling like teenagers in an attempt to make my heart burst.

“We were just hanging out for a bit,” Paul said into the confession camera, but the blush on his cheeks revealed all the secrets he wanted to hide.

So how did this happen, you may ask? Remember when Paul taught Bachelorettes how to barbecue? Yes so, Shivani was sent home that night and by the magic of the universe, the two sat together on the plane where their affection took off (got it?).

Sounds a bit like a Hollywood rom-com but I LOVE IT and while the two haven’t confirmed their bf / gf status yet, it doesn’t seem like their love bubble is going to burst anytime soon.

In other After Party news, Annie cries feeling like an outsider and even her OG bully girl Lydia is hesitant about it. Ouch. Maybe Nikki was right when she said, “catch that guy, get rid of the girls.” Or in Annie’s case, losing men and women.

Vaz took off his shirt a million times then complained about being recognized as the man who took off his shirt – that line is obsolete the first time you say it, Vaz. Move over.

But all attention is turned away from a shirtless figure when Nikki – an eager cupid, drags him and Georgia away to chat in a love corner. That didn’t go well, obviously, because Vaz later informed the confession cameras that he was going to sneak into DM Negin.

* Eye roll * There’s nothing I can say about that.

Devaney decides his history – and his current feelings – because Vaz needs to know and he won’t leave her alone, which of course means he doesn’t want a bar for her because men never want what they can have.

Trust Dev, he is not the one who escapes.
Trust Dev, he is not the one who escapes.

Vaz walked away from him and the wise Lexie said what every best friend said to him when he was drunk at least once, “Devaney, you have to stop it. You have to stop it.” Thank God for Lexie.

And to cut this short, since not much happened, Chanel and Moses went for a walk where Chanel asked why Moses didn’t tell her she liked him.

Moses, the boy who hesitated, broke his heart a second time by saying “honestly, at that moment, I didn’t know how I felt about you.”

Ughhhhhhhhh really Moses?

But that doesn’t bother Chanel too much as it turns out that this cheerful gem of a woman has found herself a man.

“I deserve someone to tell me every day that I am right for them and I have them. I became a man and I was very happy.”

Cheers ladies!
Cheers ladies!

Cheers for it my queen and cheers for the end of another Bachelor / Bachelor season.

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Switzerland- Suisse’s Bitcoin bank license offer met regulatory hurdles | Instant News


(MENAFN – Swissinfo) Cryptocurrency company Bitcoin Suisse has withdrawn its banking license application, in part because it failed to meet the anti-money laundering requirements of Swiss financial regulators.

This content was published March 17 2021 – 12:02 March 17 2021 – 12:02 Matthew Allen

When not covering fintech, cryptocurrency, blockchain, banking and commerce, swissinfo.ch business correspondents can be found playing cricket all over Switzerland – including the frozen lake of St Moritz.

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‘The application process has demonstrated the need for further review of the anti-money laundering framework and the potential for improvement. Bitcoin Suisse have started their respective projects which, however, are taking more time than anticipated, ‘the companies said in a statement on Wednesday.

The Swiss Financial Market Supervisory Authority (FINMA) said there were ‘various’ reasons for external Link to notify Bitcoin Suisse that its current license application’ was not eligible for approval and that the prognosis was unfavorable. Among them, there are indications of weaknesses in the money laundering defense mechanism. ‘

This setback is a blow to Bitcoin Suisse’s growth ambitions, especially in the nascent digital securities market. FINMA granted banking licenses to two of its rivals, Sygnum and SEBA in 2019, the same year Bitcoin Suisse submitted its own (now failed) application.

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The Brains Trust: Dementia – ‘That’s a secret we’re trying to hide’ | Instant News


Dementia is perhaps the biggest and worst understood problem in New Zealand. This is rapidly growing in our aging population – almost everyone will have a family member or know someone suffering from some form of the disease. It is already the number one cause of death in the UK and for women in Australia and a similar trend is likely to occur here.

But we don’t talk much about dementia. Maybe it’s understandable because the conversation can hurt. Many patients find their own children and grandchildren unrecognizable because they are reduced to childlike states with only memories from their youth. The family members in turn watched helplessly as they got lost by their parents and grandparents. They see their loved ones become frustrated and frightened because they have forgotten how to perform basic daily rituals.

Herald reporters Mike Scott and Carolyne Meng-Yee decided it was time to start talking about the “D-word,” as Meng-Yee put it, in The Brains Trust, our six-part online video series funded by Broadcast New Zealand. In the article below, she reminisces about how she and Scott came up with a plan to uncover the disease and tells the story of a devoted caregiver and scientist looking for a cure. And as Meng-Yee explained, for him and Scott this was more than just a story – it was personal.

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Waive the patents for the COVID vaccine to benefit poor countries, activists say | Instant News


GENEVA (Reuters) – Doctors Without Borders (MSF) staged a protest at the World Trade Organization on Thursday against what it says is the reluctance of the rich world to give up patents and allow more production of COVID-19 vaccines for poor countries.

Activists seeking to waive intellectual property rules unfurl a large sign reading “No Monopoly on COVID – Rich Countries Stop Blocking TRIPS Waivers” in a park next to the WTO headquarters on Lake Geneva.

They want the terms of the TRIPS agreement – Aspects of Intellectual Property Related to WTO Trade – to be replaced to allow generic or other manufacturers to make new products.

WTO member states are holding new talks next week on proposals by India and South Africa to override regulations for COVID-19 drugs and vaccines.

“If we have neglect, we will be able in a number of countries to increase production now, which will allow diagnostics, drugs and vaccines to get to where they are most needed,” Stephen Cornish, general director of MSF Switzerland, told Reuters at the WTO.

“At the moment we are seeing very few vaccines making it to the global South, and this is unacceptable in the world today,” he said.

About 100 countries are now supporting the campaign, Cornish added.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director general of the World Health Organization (WHO), backed up the move in a tweet on Thursday: “If a temporary patent waiver cannot be issued now, during these unprecedented times, when is the right time?”

“Big Pharmacy” has rejected a proposal that would grant compulsory licensing overriding patent rules. Britain, Switzerland and the United States, which have strong domestic pharmaceutical industries, are against neglect.

“Rich countries, EU, US, Canada and Switzerland … are blocking that reduction. And they’re doing it in the name of profit and business and the status quo instead of putting people’s lives over profit, “Cornish said.

Globally, 265 million doses of vaccine have been given, with 80% in just 10 countries, WHO emergency expert Mike Ryan said on social media on Wednesday evening.

He welcomed the launch of the first COVID-19 vaccine this week through the COVAX facility which aims to deliver doses to low-income countries, starting in Ivory Coast.

Nearly 10 million doses have been given in more than 10 countries, he said, adding: “It is a big step forward in terms of at least starting the journey towards better vaccine distribution around the world.”

additional reporting by Stephanie Nebehay; Written by Stephanie Nebehay; edited by William Maclean

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Substitutes: The demand for foreign embryos, eggs, sperm is increasing in New Zealand | Instant News


The demand for embryos to be sent to New Zealand from abroad to bear children has increased due to Covid-19. Photo / 123rf

Demand for embryos, eggs and sperm to be shipped to New Zealand has increased as Kiwis are no longer able to travel for fertility treatment abroad due to Covid-19.

But getting valuable cargo into the countryside in an attempt to create babies has become much more difficult.

Finding surrogate mothers or egg or sperm donors in New Zealand can be difficult, partly because paying them is illegal here. Most of the surrogate is someone parents know, but there is an increasing trend of people turning to the internet to find someone.

Prior to Covid, many expectant parents went to specialized clinics abroad where commercial surrogacy was legal and where embryo transfers would take place.

Dr Mary Birdsall, group director of Fertility Associates, said parents should rethink the process.

“We are seeing more and more demand from all kinds of different fertility treatments involving offshore clinics. So, people who want to send eggs, sperm, embryos around the world … and to New Zealand. I think Covid has made it a very nice landscape. more challenging. “

Specialized companies that usually have staff accompanying goods on board cannot provide that service, which creates a risk.

“The options for transferring embryos around the world are becoming much more limited and more expensive.

“What used to happen before Covid was you basically paid a courier to personally carry your embryos in a small portable freezing device. You can’t do that right now, unless they’re ready for quarantine.”

It is also likely that the operator will not receive an exemption from the New Zealand Government from being allowed into the country.

Some companies do offer unaccompanied transport services, Birdsall said, but he warns: “When they are so valuable, it only adds to the element of risk.”

The director of the Fertility Association group, Dr. Mary Birdsall.  Photo / Provided
The director of the Fertility Association group, Dr. Mary Birdsall. Photo / Provided

Fertility Associates makes 80 percent of surrogate applications to the New Zealand Assisted Reproductive Technology Ethics Committee, the body that considers and approves them for fertility clinics.

An Ecart spokesperson said they were still counting the number of substitutes approved in 2020 but there were 15 in the year to June 2016 and 14 in the year to June 2019.

Fertility Associates said the company submitted 25 applications to Ecart for surrogacy last year. All are approved, and one is suspended.

Attorney Margaret Casey QC, who has acted for targeted parents involving the birth of more than 100 children born via surrogacy in recent years, at home and abroad, said the US had been popular with Kiwis for finding surrogacy and for transfers. embryo. Most of the states were called “surrogate friend states.”

Attorney Margaret Casey.  Photo / Provided
Attorney Margaret Casey. Photo / Provided

“This means that it is regulated in that state, usually resulting in the parent in question having the first US birth certificate. There are still a few states in the US that transfer parents by adoption. Canada, Ukraine, and Georgia are also countries where People parents in New Zealand are looking for. If New Zealanders have cultural links with a country where surrogacy is approved, I also look at cases of surrogacy in that country. For example, South Africa, Namibia and Vietnam. follow so that surrogacy occurs legally. “

Many countries do not recognize surrogate mothers. In some countries, such as New Zealand, parents must adopt a child born through a surrogate mother, even if it is their biological child.

But she said it was difficult to see trends in surrogacy over the past year because of Covid.

“Obviously it is difficult to travel to other countries to make embryos with your genetic material during this time of Covid. It is difficult for surrogate mothers to go to the clinic for transfer due to internal travel restrictions and it is a very stressful time trying to manage a pregnancy remotely. “

Producing birth certificates and passports in countries that have been covered by Covid is also “very stressful”.

“The irony is because Covid surrogacy is more attractive in some overseas countries simply because the pace of life is slowing down and it might be a good time to get pregnant if that is something you are considering.”

She is calling for changes around reimbursement of a woman who agrees to act as reimbursement for pregnancy expenses.

“It doesn’t commercialize the pregnancy – it just prevents a person from going backwards because of the contribution. It’s too difficult to meet these costs under the current rules and that has to change.”

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