Tag Archives: Brendon McCullum

Ian Smith revisited his last memorable moment in the 2019 World Cup final between England and New Zealand at Lord’s | Instant News


This is the time: Archer to Guptill. Two to win. Guptill will push two. They must leave. This throw must get to the end of the guard! He understands. England has won the World Cup with the lowest margin. The thinnest of all margins. Absolute ecstasy for Britain, suffering, suffering for New Zealand …

That was earlier Ian Smith during the high octane moment of last year’s World Cup final at Lord’s. After his feet and adrenaline flowed through his body language, New Zealand completed a fierce battle between England and England New Zealand in the middle. His mesmerizing remarks during tense times, it was generally said, had lifted cricket broadcasts to a different plane when the home team won the final with an unprecedented countdown of boundaries during the match after the match ended with a double tie.

One year after the final, Smith, a former New Zealand goalkeeper, looks back at that iconic moment
Mirror and said he could remember the last moments by closing his eyes. Excerpt from the interview …


How well do you remember that moment?


I have seen it again on the recording several times. I usually don’t make it a habit to go back to old games. I can remember it very quickly. Past Nasser Hussain and Ian Bishop, the three of us in the comment box. We have been there for 90 minutes, usually one comment session about half an hour. So, we were there to absorb the whole situation for a long time. We all looked out the window. The Comment Box at Lord’s is probably one of the most beautiful in the world. I can close my eyes now and I can see the view easily.

You stand at the last moment. That’s a rare sight from the cricket game comment box …


I think that’s spontaneous. I only stood up a few times, I think the same thing happened at the end of normal time, when England tried to push for a second run to win too. I did not do it intentionally.

Would you say something different, in hindsight, at those times?


I think not. I’ll be honest with you, I didn’t plan anything. I don’t know who entered into the situation who would win and how it would turn out. What I said just came out of what I saw.

The match must be full of twists and unexpected results. As a career commentator, are you preparing to face such possibilities?


As a commentator, you realize it’s not just any cricket game. You realize that it is the World Cup final. There is far more important to it. You can spend all day there among all the other commentators and you talk about the game and what will happen, what scenarios will happen. You really don’t know until you see a list of comments when you will do your work. So, that doesn’t mean you can prepare a script. If the game finishes early, you don’t get the last assignment, because it’s over. If this is a one-sided game, then you don’t have a high level of excitement. So you have to adjust. The best thing to do is undergo a game. Even when you are not in the comment chair, make sure you watch everything open. The World Cup finals are different, because of the importance of that.

Do you remember such iconic words from other games, like saying ‘remember the name’ from Ian Bishop after the 2016 Twenty20 World Cup?


I was in the final of T20. I was lucky to call Brendon McCullumthree hundred [in Wellington vs India, 2014]. No New Zealand (ever) scored three hundred. I was lucky to be in the World Cup semifinals before. Grant Elliott hit Dale Steyn for six to put New Zealand into the final for the first time and that was in front of 40,000 odd people in the Eden Park in Auckland. It was a fantastic experience. I was very lucky, for years. I work at rugby too. I was fortunate to be there in three Rugby World Cup finals too, which involved New Zealand’s victory.

Did you get feedback from fellow broadcasters or production crews or experts after the show?


I got lots of messages from my friends and colleagues. Not just words, not only publishers, not only commentators, it’s also about the people who put the photos together, who capture the pictures, the people who put pictures, who tell you about Super Over. Everything is put together by many experienced people. We are the people who get credit but without the right pictures and the right information, that’s impossible. It is a group effort.

Did you realize during the game that you gave history in cricket and broadcasting too?


I don’t think so, I know there will be a new winner. Either way, I have to be ready. But I didn’t realize that I had to do something better for it. I think the way the game is played, all the drama involved, takes me as a commentator to that level, it brings me. If you can survive with that, you will flow like a game.

What was the division of labor between you, the bishop and Husain during the last moments?


There is no division of labor. But you have a role. One person calls for action, which is me. Nasser Hussain was the first analyst, he got first glance at a rerun. Ian Bishop must add more than that. But if he hasn’t and we can’t add him, he knows there’s no point in talking. You know your role because when they send a list of comments on the board, you are included in the role and because the three of us were put together before, we know our role. It’s all about what you have to do, no planning between deliveries, no conversation, so we were all quite surprised by what happened in the last half hour or the last forty minutes.

After such an appearance, you must become a hot-shot commentator in the world?


I hope I have opened a few more doors and some of the latest work around the world. I hope I can call something like that again. I’m 63. I hope I have some good cricket games and some good comments left in me. That’s the sad thing about cricket, what’s happening right now. Hopefully, the IPL will be there and there will be opportunities for players, commentators, fans. The faster the better for me.

Then why didn’t you make a comment on IPL? Don’t you think the excitement in IPL can challenge your chatting talents?


I would love to be at the IPL, but it might not be this year, because I got a few rugby matches. But in the future I want to comment on the IPL competition. So, if there is an opportunity and if there are vacancies, I want to come.

What principles do you follow when making comments?

Comments are not competition, it’s a combination, you work together, you don’t try and beat each other. You respect the knowledge of the people sitting next to you, you value their strength. This is my philosophy. Also, I’m from New Zealand, but continue to the situation of comments with an open mind about who will win and who will lose. That is my philosophy.

Finally, you have talked about that moment but how do you look back to the finals and the World Cup? Is New Zealand emerging as a new player of world cricket?


Come to think of it, it was a very strange way to decide on the World Cup final. I don’t think one of the captains goes to the team in the morning and says, ‘look it’s the World Cup, but let’s make sure we have a lot of crawling because maybe it will be determined at Super Over and a team with (more) fours might win.’ So, I thought that was strange. And yes, I don’t think we’re choking on God. We compete until the end. You will not hear that from me now.

.



image source

‘I can close my eyes now and see those scenes so easily’: Smith revived the final WC | Instant News


Interview:
Ian Smith, former Guard & Commentator of NZ


Commentator Ian Smith back to the unforgettable last moments of the 2019 World Cup final between England and England
NZ at Lord’s.


This is the time: Archer to Guptill. Two to win. Guptill will push two. They must leave. This throw must get to the end of the guard! He understands. England has won the World Cup with the lowest margin. The thinnest of all margins. Absolute ecstasy for Britain, suffering, suffering for New Zealand …

That was Ian Smith during last year’s high octane World Cup final at Lord’s. Standing on his feet and spurring adrenaline through his body language, New Zealand completes the fierce battle between Britain and New Zealand in the middle. His mesmerizing remarks during tense times, it was generally said, had lifted cricket broadcasts to a different plane when the home team won the final with an unprecedented countdown of boundaries during the match after the match ended with a double tie.

One year after the final, Smith, a former New Zealand goalkeeper, looks back at that iconic moment
Mirror and said he could remember the last moments by closing his eyes. Excerpt from the interview …

♦ How well do you remember the moment?

I have seen it again on the recording several times. I don’t usually get used to playing old games again. I can remember it very quickly. Past Nasser Hussain and Ian Bishop, The three of us in the comment box. We have been there for 90 minutes, usually one comment session about half an hour. So, we were there to absorb the whole situation for a long time. We all looked out the window. That Comments box at Lord’s maybe one of the most beautiful in the world. I can close my eyes now and I can see the view easily.

♦ You stand at the last moment. That’s a rare sight from the cricket game comment box …

I think that’s spontaneous. I only stood up a few times, I think the same thing happened at the end of normal time, when England tried to push for a second run to win too. I did not do it intentionally.

• Were you going to say something different, behind, at that time?

I think not. I’ll be honest with you, I didn’t plan anything. I don’t know who entered into the situation who would win and how it would turn out. What I said just came out of what I saw.

♦ The match must be full of twists and unexpected results. As a career commentator, are you preparing to face such possibilities?

As a commentator, you realize it’s not just any cricket game. You realize that it is the World Cup final. There is far more important to it. You can spend all day there among all the other commentators and you talk about the game and what will happen, what scenarios will happen. You really don’t know until you see the list of comments, when you will do your work. So, that doesn’t mean you can prepare a script. If the game finishes early, you don’t get the last assignment, because it’s over. If this is a one-sided game, then you don’t have a high level of excitement. So you have to adjust. The best thing to do is undergo a game. Even when you are not in the comment chair, make sure you watch everything in progress. The World Cup finals are different, because of the importance of that.

♦ Do you remember such iconic words from other games, like saying ‘remember the name’ from Ian Bishop after the 2016 Twenty20 World Cup?

I was in the final of T20. I was lucky to call Brendon McCullumthree hundred [in Wellington vs India, 2014]. No New Zealand (ever) scored three hundred. I was lucky to be in the World Cup semifinals before. Grant Elliott hit Dale Steyn for six to put New Zealand into the final for the first time and that was in front of 40,000 odd people in the Eden Park in Auckland. It was a fantastic experience. I was very lucky, for years. I work at rugby too. I was fortunate to be there in three Rugby World Cup finals too, which involved New Zealand’s victory.

THEIR HEADY SCENE: England with the 2019 World Cup trophy; (inset) Ian Smith (right) during a tense moment in the 2019 final of Eng-NZ WC

♦ Did you get feedback from fellow broadcasters or production crews or experts after the show?

I got lots of messages from my friends and colleagues. Not just words, not only publishers, not only commentators, it’s also about the people who put the photos together, who capture the pictures, the people who put up the pictures, who tell you about Super Over . Everything is put together by many experienced people. We are the people who get credit but without the right pictures and the right information, that’s impossible. It is a group effort.

♦ Did you realize during the game that you provided history in cricket and broadcasting as well?

I don’t think so, I know there will be a new winner. However I must be ready. But I didn’t realize that I had to do something better for it. I think the way the game is played, all the drama involved, takes me as a commentator to that level, it brings me. If you can survive with that, you will flow like a game.

What was the division of labor between you, the bishop and Husain during the last moments?

There is no division of labor. But you have a role. One person calls for action, which is me. Nasser Hussain was the first analyst, he got first glance at a rerun. Ian Bishop must add more than that. But if he hasn’t and we can’t add him, he knows there’s no point in talking. You know your role because when they send a list of comments on the board, you are included in the role and because the three of us were put together before, we know our role. It’s all about what you have to do, no planning between deliveries, no conversation, so we were all quite surprised by what happened in the last half hour or the last forty minutes.

♦ After such an appearance, do you have to be a hero commentator in the world?

I hope I have opened a few more doors and some of the latest work around the world. I hope I can call something like that again. I’m 63. I hope I have some good cricket games and some good comments left in me. That’s the sad thing about cricket, what’s happening right now. Hopefully, the IPL will be there and there will be opportunities for players, commentators, fans. The faster the better for me.

♦ Then why didn’t you make a comment on the IPL? Don’t you think the excitement in IPL can challenge your chatting talents?

I would love to be at the IPL, but it might not be this year, because I got a few rugby matches. But in the future I want to comment on the IPL competition. So, if there is an opportunity and if there are vacancies, I want to come.

♦ What principles did you follow when making comments?

Comments are not competition, it’s a combination, you work together, you don’t try and beat each other. You respect the knowledge of the people sitting next to you, you value their strength. This is my philosophy. Also, I’m from New Zealand, but continue to the situation of comments with an open mind about who will win and who will lose. That is my philosophy.

Finally, you have talked about the moment but how do you look back at the finals and the World Cup? Is New Zealand emerging as a new player of world cricket?

Come to think of it, it was a very strange way to decide on the World Cup final. I don’t think one of the captains goes to the team in the morning and says, ‘look it’s the World Cup but let’s make sure we have a lot of crawling, because maybe it will be determined at Super Over and a team with (more) fours might win. ‘So, I think that’s strange. And yes, I don’t think we’re choking on God. We compete until the end. You will not hear that from me now.

.



image source

Big Bash League: Brendon McCullum calls a team from New Zealand in the Big Bash League Cricket News | Instant News


AUCKLAND: Used New Zealand skipper Brendon McCullum on Wednesday called for the introduction of a team from his country in Indonesia Australiathis Big Bash League to increase audience interest in the T20 competition.

All cricket now being detained because the COVID-19 pandemic is sweeping the world with several tours and tournaments canceled or postponed. Even the future of the T20 World Cup, which is scheduled for early October 18, is shrouded in uncertainty.

Several countries, including Australia, have imposed travel restrictions and McCullum felt that adding a team from New Zealand to the tournament could arouse the interest of spectators in the league, which has experienced a decline in crowds and TV numbers in the past two years.

“What are the opportunities for Big Bash if there is a lack of international cricket,” McCullum told ‘SEN Radio’.

“If we are honest, Big Bash has made a few twists in following lately and a good opportunity to really launch it back into the eyes of Australian sports fans and how great the opportunity to bring the New Zealand team to the BBL,” he added.

The former captain also suggested taking off “foreign” caps on New Zealand players because some international players might not be able to compete if COVID-19 restrictions continue.

“Maybe you can even use New Zealand players as local players because there might be a shortage of foreign players who want to travel, especially high-quality ones,” McCullum said.

“A little creative thinking and other opportunities to bring New Zealand across Tasman,” he added.

Talks for the trans-Tasman bubble, which will allow travel between the two countries, have taken place at the government level because coronavirus cases in both countries continue to decline.

Last week, Australian officials gave 36 New Zealand rugby players and staff a rare exception to the country’s ban on international arrivals.

Events-2-April -28

.



image source

Trying to enjoy a break for now, said former New Zealand captain Brendon McCullum – The New Indian Express | Instant News


By ANI

KOLKATA: Because all sporting action around the world has stopped because of the coronavirus pandemic, former New Zealand captain Brendon McCullum said that he was trying to enjoy a break like now.

McCullum is scheduled to train the Kolkata Knight Riders in the upcoming edition of the Indian Premier League.

The tournament is scheduled to start from March 29, but has been suspended indefinitely due to a coronavirus pandemic.

“Well, I guess we all deal with it in different ways, and every country has its own problems at the moment. It must have passed slowly. I tried to enjoy time at home with family, because in a funny way, we are all forced to really spend a lot of time with our fantastic loved ones. We might not stop and take a lot of time to appreciate it, “the official website of the TRC quoted McCullum as said.

“When we are on the other side of this pandemic, and hopefully we don’t lose too many lives and everything is back to normal in the schedule we are all cricket trainers, commentators and people around who are involved in the game, it will happen to be enough intense. So I’m trying to enjoy a break for now, “he added.

Coincidentally, 12 years ago on this exact date, McCullum gave the glorious start to the IPL when he played a knock 158 times in the first match of the tournament.

McCullum is often credited with bringing cruelty and a never-said attitude in the New Zealand team.

Under his leadership, New Zealand has reached the final of the 2015 World Cup 50-over.

McCullum played 101 Tests, 260 ODI and 71 T20I for Kiwis.

.



image source

Is New Zealand always fun? | Instant News


In our series Come to think of it, where we bring a new perspective to accept the wisdom of cricket received, we ask whether New Zealand is always good. The answer, as they say, may surprise you.

Before I begin, I want to ask forgiveness from all the gods we worship humans, including Richard Dawkins, because I will commit the sin of cricket, which I know I can burn in the fiercest lake in hell.

I will be a little critical of Kane Williamson.

Some of you who have not pressed the screen in disgust, remain with me.

Asked when during the World Cup last year why his team was considered “good international cricket people”, Williamson replied by saying, basically, goodness was only their nature. They are New Zealanders, and New Zealanders are easygoing and caring people and are fundamentally good. The team is just a reflection of the stubborn Kiwi-ness. Friendly. Wise. Give. You know, good.

At present, this is rather difficult to debate. When you watch Mitchell Santner cheer Carlos Brathwaite who is confused some time after the West Indies fall desperate loss, or you hear the elegance of Williamson contemplate the great misfortune litany which burdens his team at the World Cup, it seems there is no other way. Less than a month after the final, Williamson played a training match in northern Colombo, and a handful of fans came to bring a cake to celebrate his birthday. During a drinking break, Williamson ran, bite the cake fed to him by a fan, instead fed the fan, and ran back to cheers of joy. How many more funny things can happen on planet earth that day? You basically have to be a monster to not be persuaded.

READ ALSO: Come to think of it: Is Greg Chappell really a terrible coach in India?

Before Williamson, there was Brendon McCullum – Tattooed little supernovas with tattoos – which light not only New Zealand’s path to limited prosperity, but also Britain.

And almost everyone who goes to New Zealand is raving again about the landscape, yes, but also people and their basic human goodness. Right now, they might have real world leader around, too. So it makes sense, right? The New Zealand cricket team is certainly good. Because New Zealanders are kind.

However, I will ask you to remember again. You don’t even need to go that far. Try March 2011 in Mirpur – World Cup quarterfinals that year. With 101 to exit 22.1 overs, Faf du Plessis ran out of AB de Villiers – clearly a key player in the chase. Like sharks in a blood vessel, New Zealand field officers gather at du Plessis, teeth open, breaking all at once. Four years later, several members of this New Zealand team – McCullum, Ross Taylor, Daniel Vettori and Martin Guptill – will be lovers of the World Cup in their homes, not harsh words coming out of their lips, or bad words about them. But on this damp Dhaka night, many were seen trailing du Plessis and his team-mates, letting him fly with curses. The lasting memory from that night is Kyle Mills dragged away from the fight with South African batsmen. Mills, wearing a neon bib, just runs drinks.

In aughts, when Australian geniuses who were infuriated ruled the world of cricket, New Zealand was often in the if-you-can-beat-em-join-em brigade. Led by Stephen Fleming – magnificent off the field but often fierce on it – New Zealand found success in making the dart board run from the visiting captain. It is Graeme Smith, 23, who stole the most stinging and impressive stream of Fleming abuse. Heading to start a complicated chase in a rain-shortened game in the Garden of Eden in 2004, Smith was cornered and mercilessly surrounded in front of the camera. The South African captain lost composure, and finally the match. In the following years Smith will touch on how much he learned on the tour. How some famous steel in his eyes was forged in the fire. Immediately after the match, asked about New Zealand’s psychological warfare, Fleming turned neatly into his friendly press conference avatar, and said this: “Graeme is an emotional man. That is a gap we think we will explore. He takes the bait.”

New Zealand’s greatest team (apart from the present) – 80s clothing – has famous thorny characters. Richard Hadlee galaxies have been out of league teammates for decades, and sometimes accused of acting like that. Jeremy Coney later said that “the team’s reputation was filled with greed and jealousy” when Hadlee kept a Man-of-the-Series car for herself, rather than sharing her booty with the team, as was the custom at the time. In Hadlee’s defense, he had donated two such cars to the previous kitty team. But then he also occasionally blew up his teammates in public because of their lack of professionalism, including in the newspaper column. The next best player Hadlee shared the New Zealand dressing room with, Martin Crowe, no less complicated, gathering a catalog of complaints with teammates and opponents through his playing years (although he will try hard to improve that relationship in his shining final years).

READ ALSO: Come to think of it: Was South Africa really unlucky at the 1992 World Cup?

In the 90s, New Zealand disposable bottle caps on the ball to get a crushing reverse-swing in Faisalabad; Chaminda Vaas remembers Danny Morrison who was fired tell him that he wants to kill him; A mini-rebellion deteriorating tour of the West Indies in 1995-96; and there are attacks, accusations of improper player strength, and of course fierce removal Taylor as captain in 2012.

None of this goes out of step with the controversy that elite sports teams find themselves involved from time to time, but that’s the point; for almost all of their history, New Zealand has just become a regular elite sports team. Today it is led by Williamson, who has uniquely been a calm and generous force for as long as he is known. But it’s also this same side that over the past 20 years has produced stories that are just as sad as Lou Vincent, and for different reasons, Jesse Ryder. McCullum, who shapes our current admiration for the New Zealand side, has been open about how it emerged initially from what was before basically a public relations exercise, conducted in a difficult series in South Africa in 2013.

The nation itself is fascinated, to the point of being very prosperous when compared to most of the world who loves cricket, and experiences very little pressure that disturbs other global societies. However, as reminded by the Christchurch terror attacks last year, New Zealand is in many ways a place like everyone else. If the cricket has lately been a supporter of goodness in the field of cricket, it is because they have made a conscious choice to embrace humility and grace. Transformation is not without effort. After all, isn’t that far more beautiful than the alternatives?

.



image source