Tag Archives: Cannabis

Rockflowr’s New Marketing Campaign Has Proven Effective! | Instant News


In late October, Rockflowr GmbH, renamed Rockflowr Exchange started a new marketing campaign to expand its sales channels Switzerland and Europe Sell ​​CBD flowers, oils and isolates. Since then, revenue has grown significantly. “Some days our showroom is full of wholesale customers and we have 4-5 people waiting outside,” exclaimed Marcel Gamma, CBDD CEO.

Rockflowr’s business has spread beyond Switzerland across the EU. Rockflowr became famous for being able to find and sell the best quality flowers at Europe, attracting customers from all parts of the EU. Over the last two weeks Rockflowr has received almost a commitment 1,000,000 CHF in repeated orders from EU-based customers. “Our business is growing fast and 2021 could be an extraordinary year for us company,” stated Pascal Siegenthaler, Managing Director of Sales for Rockflowr.

CBDD focuses on using equity to acquire profitable Swiss assets at attractive valuations to create value for all of our shareholders

CBDD through its e-commerce website offers full spectrum superior CBD products without relying on THC to activate the benefits of cannabidiol. Black Pearl CBD has 0% THC, but is not an Insulation where the THC is removed from the product making it ineffective. We use a proprietary technique that adds terpenes as the activation ingredient, resulting in a very effective and best product in the industry. CBD of Denver, Inc. offers several new products including a new skin cream, CBD speed stick and CBN gel cap, which are now available on their updated website www.blackpearlcbd.com.

The information contained herein includes forward-looking statements. These statements relate to future events or future financial performance, which involve both known and unknown risks and you should not rely too much on these statements. Forward-looking statements reflect our current views with respect to future events. We have no obligation publicly about updating or revising this forward-looking statement for any reason.

CBD SOURCE from Denver, Inc.

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New Zealand counts down to verdict on cannabis and euthanasia votes | World News | Instant News


TResults of a New Zealand referendum on whether to legalize marijuana and euthanasia will be released this week, with campaigners concerned that the turmoil of 2020 could tilt voting towards the status quo.

Political experts say that in years of unrest and instability, voters tend to keep things as they are, which could affect the likelihood of both referendum questions being passed.

Questions have appeared on election ballots, but the results will not be released by the election commission until Friday.

Polls throughout 2020 have shown strong public support of between 60-70% for legalizing euthanasia and also have the support of the prime minister. Jacinda Ardern, as well as the leader of the National opposition party, Judith Collins.

But Matt Vickers, widowed lawyer and euthanasia campaigner for Lecretia Seales, said he was nervous about the outcome.

Seales died in 2015 of a brain tumor. Until her death, she and her husband struggled to make assisted deaths legal New Zealand, as in the Netherlands, Belgium, Canada, the state of Victoria in Australia, and several states in the US.

“I think I’m feeling anxious. “I really hope we will see positive results, the poll looks like that,” Vickers said earlier this month.

“Choice is fundamental to who we are as humans. When we have no options, we feel constrained. “

The End of Life Choice Act 2019 was sponsored by ACT member of parliament David Seymour. It will allow those suffering from deadly diseases to register to end their lives. Even though the law has been passed by parliament, the measure will only take effect if more than 50% of voters tick “yes”.

The law outlines the criteria for who can apply to end their life, including that those aged 18 or over, are citizens of New Zealand, suffer from a deadly disease that will end their life in six months, “experienced a significant and continuing decline. in physical ability “, is” to endure unbearable suffering that cannot be relieved “and in a position to make” the right decisions “about their death.

Those with mental illness or impairment will not be eligible, nor will those who enroll only on the basis of “old age” or disability. Two doctors – one independent – must sign the decree, with a psychiatrist called in if either doctor is in doubt.

If the euthanasia referendum passes, it is binding and will go into effect in October 2021.

The cannabis referendum, however, is not binding, and polls ahead of the election suggest a country is divided.

Voters have been asked to decide whether they want to pass the bill that will legalize marijuana and govern how it is used and sold. This includes producing and selling both fresh and dried cannabis, including plants and seeds – for people over the age of 20. The changes will impose stricter restrictions than rules around the sale of alcohol and tobacco.

A One News Colmar Brunton poll in February found 51% of people intended to vote against legalizing marijuana, with 39% choosing to allow it. The rest of the 1,000 people surveyed said they would vote not to vote or didn’t know what they would vote for.

Importantly, more than 50% of voters need to say yes to law changes for it to be considered by parliament.

Andrew Geddis, a law professor at the University of Otago, said although there was no legal requirement for the upcoming government to comply with the referendum results, it would be “quite difficult for them not to act” with a strong yes majority.

Ardern has repeatedly refused to state his position on marijuana but said he will tell the public how he chooses once the results are released.

Ardern recently said he had been using marijuana “for a long time.”

Former Labor prime minister, Helen Clark, said the marijuana ban was “not working” and had to be abandoned.

“Obviously, the prospect of imposing criminal sanctions has little impact on people’s behavior,” Clark wrote in a recent opinion article for the Guardian.

“Proof from a longitudinal study conducted in New Zealand indicates that by age 25, 80% of New Zealanders have tried marijuana at least once. Put simply, the prohibition-based policy approach has not been eradicated and will not eradicate cannabis consumption and supply in New Zealand or anywhere else where its use is established. “

Prof Michael Baker, an epidemiologist from the University of Otago who has worked on the country’s successful Covid-19 response, said New Zealand had proven itself to be a world leader in leveraging “innovative and evidence-based approaches” to complex and must-have public health problems. applied. the same pragmatic lens for marijuana.

“It’s time to take the same new approach to cannabis laws and put public health first,” said Prof. Baker.

“Our marijuana ban model is outdated and doesn’t work. Supporting legal reform is about reframing marijuana use as a health problem opening up new, more effective ways to minimize the harm this drug causes. “

Cannabis is the most commonly used illegal drug in New Zealand, and the most recent New Zealand Health Survey found that 15%, or 590,000 adults in New Zealand used marijuana in the past 12 months.

Māori make up 16% of New Zealand’s population and are shown to be disproportionately affected by New Zealand’s drug laws, facing three times as many arrests and prosecutions for marijuana possession than non-Māori.

Professor Papaarangi Reid, head of the Māori health department at the University of Auckland, argues that legalization will help control the drug’s potential, its price and make it less accessible to young people.

“We are deeply concerned that Māori have borne the brunt of enforcement bias and the negative health effects of illegal cannabis,” said Reid.

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New Zealand health experts support reform of ‘outdated’ cannabis laws | World News | Instant News


Some of New Zealand’s most experienced public health experts have pledged their support for legalizing marijuana, a week after the country’s elections.

In an editorial in the New Zealand Medical Journal, specialists from the fields of addiction medicine, public health, health promotion and epidemiology have urged New Zealanders to tick yes in the referendum, a few days after the poll showed a vote at the edge of the knife.

The referendum is a “once-in-a-generation opportunity” to legalize marijuana, and promote health equality, the editorial said.

Professor Michael Baker of the University of Otago, one of the main architects of the country’s successful Covid-19 response, said New Zealand have demonstrated that they are a world leader in leveraging “innovative and evidence-based approaches” to complex public health problems.

“It’s time to take the same new approach to cannabis laws and put public health first,” said Prof. Baker.

“Our marijuana ban model is outdated and doesn’t work. Supporting legal reform is about reframing marijuana use as a health problem opening up new, more effective ways to minimize the harm this drug causes. “

Cannabis is the most commonly used illegal drug in New Zealand.

The most recent New Zealand Health Survey found that 15%, or 590,000 adults in New Zealand used marijuana in the past 12 months.

Māori make up 16% of New Zealand’s population and are shown to be disproportionately affected by New Zealand’s drug laws, facing three times as many arrests and prosecutions for marijuana possession than non-Māori.

Professor Papaarangi Reid, head of the Māori health department at the University of Auckland argues that legalization will help control the drug’s potential, its price and make it less accessible to young people.

“We are very concerned that Māori have borne the brunt of enforcing the bias and negative health effects of illegal cannabis,” said Reid.

“We know that Māori are three times more likely to be arrested and convicted of marijuana-related crimes than non-Māori with the same level of use. This is a very high price to pay, especially for policies that are ineffective at reducing harmful uses. “

Other notable figures who supported the yes vote for legalization of marijuana included former prime minister Helen Clark, who described cannabis policies as being “Worst waste of taxpayer money” and devoted considerable time and resources to campaigning for legalization.

National party leader Judith Collins said she had never tried marijuana and would vote no for the referendum. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said she had been using it “for a long time”, but had not revealed how she intended to vote.

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Going to the pot: New Zealand cools down in legalizing marijuana | World News | Instant News


met is believed to be the first country in the world to apply recreational marijuana legalization to a national public vote. But amid the pandemic, elections concentrated almost entirely on the Covid-19 crisis, and simultaneous voting on euthanasia, New Zealand’s impending cannabis referendum has yet to catch the attention of the mainstream public it might have in an ordinary year.

New Zealand will join Canada and Uruguay in the list of countries that legalize the sale and use of adult cannabis if more than half of voters approve – but public support for the measure has eroded in the 2020 polls, reversing growing support in recent years. In a debate plagued by claims of misinformation on both sides – and occurring during a packed electoral cycle – some politicians shy away from the matter altogether, fearing they will end up on the wrong side of a divisive topic.

The proposed law would legalize cannabis for people over the age of 20 – regulating how the plant is grown, used and sold – and the referendum question is non-binding; a “yes” vote means the next Parliament will have the mandate to pass it. This month, 35% of 1,000 people surveyed said they would support the proposed law according to the Colmar Brunton 1 News poll, down from 40% in June this year and 43% in November 2019.

Those who opposed the move rose to 53% in September. Other survey of 1,300 people, conducted by Horizon Research and commissioned by a cannabis drug company, showed 49.5% of those surveyed supported the law and 49.5% opposed it.

People will be allowed to buy 14g of marijuana a day under the proposed law, and grow two crops. The bill includes advertising restrictions and limits on how much of a market a single company can dominate.

Several politicians have avoided sharing their views – among them Jacinda Ardern, the prime minister and leader of the center-left Labor party, who will not say how she plans to vote, but on Wednesday night admitted to smoking marijuana in the past. The problem “has designed for the public to decide“, He said, although some of his senior parliamentarians supported the law. Judith Collins, the national leader of the center-right, the main opposition group, said her entire party would oppose the move. The left-leaning Greens supported him.

For Ardern, it makes sense to avoid getting entangled in what might fail, analysts say: he’s up high in the polls, his party is close to reaching the threshold for governing itself and holds some of the highest approval numbers New Zealand’s leader has seen.

‘Slippery slope’

Andrew Geddis, a professor of public law at the University of Otago, said that unlike assisted death – another referendum question on October 17 – legalization of marijuana has never won a clear majority in New Zealand.








Under the proposed law, New Zealand users will be able to grow two crops. Photo: Fernando Llano / AP

“Those who want to see sound will have to convince a reasonable number of people that their previous prohibited views were wrong,” he said. “Right now, it looks like they can’t do it and time is really running out.”

Supporters of the law laud its health and education-based response to the drug. On Tuesday, 60 New Zealanders – some of them well-known, including former Labor prime minister Helen Clark – launched a publicity campaign asking the public to vote yes in a referendum.

“I think there is everything to play with on this one,” said Clark, who is also chair of the Global Commission on Drug Policy. “If you are the average of all the polls it is a tough race, but it can be done.”

Clark said research abroad showed no “evidence of sustainable use” of marijuana by young people when legalized, and the form of the drug to be sold in New Zealand was “significantly less harmful to health than tobacco or alcohol”.

He dismissed the notion that marijuana use had essentially been decriminalized in New Zealand, adding that police policy on the matter turned a blind eye to supply control by organized crime and placed especially young Māori Indigenous youths on a “slippery slope” to engage in the criminal justice system.

Clark said the opposing campaign had been funded from abroad, a claim the “no” group denied.

“We are 100% funded by the Kiwi family,” said Aaron Ironside, spokesman for Smart Approaches to Marijuana NZ, a coalition of groups. “We haven’t received a single dollar from corporate or overseas interests.”

The group plans to spend an electoral limit of $ NZ300,000 plus taxes on its campaign. He pointed out that complaints to the country’s Advertising Standards Authority about his advertising had not been enforced.

Ironside said that over the past two years, polls “are basically saying what they say today”, with a consistent gap between those who oppose recreational marijuana and those who support it. He said the absence of a vote was also linked to the health of marijuana users, but that does not mean changes to the law are necessary.

“Taxes and excise on alcohol are not sufficient to cover the social dangers of alcohol,” he said. “We need to focus on health … don’t get more addicts to do that.”

His group “is not advocating for people to be punished for smoking”, Ironside added, but he claims that is not the case at this time.

Official efforts to inform the public include a report led by Juliet Gerrard, the prime minister’s chief science adviser. Cannabis not detrimental “for some users but not for others”, said Gerrard, but the referendum question was not asked by voters to decide. “Instead, the vote asks us to decide whether the regulated legal framework will increase or reduce the dangers associated with cannabis,” he said in a July statement.

The report highlights evidence that Māori are more likely to be arrested for, and convicted of, marijuana-related offenses than non-Māori, even after adjusting for levels of use. The disproportionate criminalization of black cannabis users is at the heart of a debate in the US, where the drug is legal in several states.

More than $ NZ1.4 billion in public money can be generated annually from legalized marijuana, according to a report this month by the BERL agency commissioned by the justice ministry. The authors estimate legalization will result in more than 400 cannabis shops, 5,000 new jobs, and a spike in short-term marijuana use that diminishes over three to five years.

If it is rejected, analysts say, the problem is unlikely to arise again soon. Clark, the former prime minister, was frustrated that the decision had already been put into a public vote. “This issue must be decided by parliament, not a referendum,” he said.

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It’s a strange time to travel | To select | Instant News


Next week we will be in Pennsylvania to visit our daughter who is at school in Erie on Lake Erie This will be one of our most unique trips as face masks are needed for almost the entire trip . Traveling is just not what it used to be. Do you remember when people smoked cigarettes in the middle of the flight? A little light came on to tell the passengers it was time to put out their cigarettes, we were going to land. Smokers who flew on the plane at the time were very upset when new rules banned smoking on board. I have a feeling these same people would be really unhappy with the requirement to wear a mask for the entire flight We received an email reminding us that anyone over 2 years old must also wear a mask at airports except when we were We were also told that we would receive an “ all-in-one ” snack bag that included a wrapped disinfectant wipe, an 8.5 ounce water bottle and two snacks, as well as a sealed drink on flights over 2 hours and 20 minutes. “On flights shorter than that, we’ll have a sealed drink and that’s it. No more friendly flight attendant taking our drink order. Erie is quite close to Niagara Falls. We were wondering if we could see it or not, as people like to go to the Canadian side for a better view, and the border between the US and Canada is closed at least until the end of August. which is the boat that takes you near the falls, was closed in June, it is now open on the US side and available for people in good health, wearing masks and willing to stand at least 6 feet from other people on a small boat .Fort Niagara opened in July and is available for healthy masked visitors, which is the same for all the restaurants we stop at. There won’t be any buffets though, and it looks like food “that requires minimal preparation” will be the rule. Fortunately, Pennsylvania is not on the list of states that require a 14-day quarantine when we arrive home. We were also assured that the plane is cleaned within an inch of its life and that airports will be cleaner than our homes. Still, we have small containers of disinfectant to use liberally when we feel too far away from a sink and soap, and we’ll avoid other people like the plague. our face, and white where the mask was. It’s a strange time to travel. .



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