Tag Archives: cardiology

Losing a long-term partner can be deadly, research shows | | Instant News


(CNN) – The world has joined Queen Elizabeth II in grief over the loss of her husband of seven decades on Friday, Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh, just two months before her 100th birthday.

The duo are a loving and close couple. Queen told guests at lunch on their 50th wedding anniversary the Phillip “simply put, been my strength and stayed all this time.”

With the loss of what the Queen calls “constant love and assistance,” attention is now turning to the Queen’s well-being. The death of a loved one is a blow every time, but losing a partner after years of being together can be very difficult.

Studies it has been shown that surviving partners may suffer from sleep disorders, depressive episodes, anxiety, impaired immune function, and poorer overall physical health.

For those concerned about the Queen at a time of great personal loss, many may wonder if there is medical evidence of grief affecting one’s health.

Broken heart syndrome is real

Known as stress cardiomyopathy, “broken heart” syndrome is a documented medical condition.

Broken heart syndrome occurs when the heart is suddenly stunned, is in acute stress, and the left ventricle is weakened. Instead of contracting into a normal arrow-like shape, the left ventricle fails to function, creating a rounder, pot-like shape.

First described in 1990 in Japan, heartbreak is so similar to a Japanese octopus trap called takotsubo that doctors have begun to refer to the condition as Takotsubo’s cardiomyopathy.

“The heart actually changes shape in response to acute emotional distress, such as following a break in a romantic relationship or the death of a loved one,” says New York cardiologist and author Dr. Sandeep Jauhar to CNN. in a previous interview.

In many cases, however, when the acute emotional stress disappears, the heart recovers and returns to its normal shape, Jauhar said.

“But I have had patients with acute congestive heart failure, life-threatening arrhythmias, and even death from this condition,” said Jauhar. “I think that is the clearest example of how our emotional life directly affects our hearts.”

This syndrome is most commonly experienced by women (90% of cases occur in women), by people with a history of neurological problems, such as seizures, and by people with a history of mental health problems.

The ‘widow effect’

There is another medical reality that can occur when a long relationship ends, research shows.

“The increased likelihood of a recently widowed death – often called the” widow effect “- is one of the best documented examples of the health effects of social relationships,” writes Dr. Nicholas Christakis, who runs The Human Nature Lab at Yale University and co-author Felix Elwert, a professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in a seminal 2008 study.

That risk of an elderly man or woman who died from any cause increased by between 30% and 90% in the first three months after the death of a partner, then fell to about 15% in the following months. The widow effect has been documented in all ages and races around the world.

Christakis and Elwert followed a representative sample of 373,189 older married couples in the United States from 1993 to 2002 and found that “being widowed did not uniformly increase the risk of all causes of death”.

When a partner dies from sudden death, such as an accident or infection, the risk of death by the surviving partner increases, the study found. The same is true for chronic diseases such as diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung or colon cancer that require careful patient care or prevention.

However, if a partner dies of Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease, there is no impact on the surviving partner’s health – perhaps because the partner has had sufficient time to prepare for the loss of their partner.

Regardless, “the death of a partner, for whatever reason, is a significant threat to health and poses a substantial risk of death from any cause,” Christakis and Elwert wrote.

What can be done

Support is the key to how well a person can cope with their partner’s death. Many people find grief counseling helpful, according to US National Institute of Aging.

In Great Britain, people can get psychological therapy without reference from a general practitioner. The UK’s National Health Service recommends getting in touch if you have been in a bad mood for more than two weeks or a method you tried yourself didn’t help.

AARP (formerly known as the American Association of Retired Persons) also has this advice for survivors.

Don’t be bold: Surround yourself with people you don’t need to pretend to be okay with. “Grieving is a very brave and strong act; not for the weak,” said AARP.

Be kind to yourself: Get enough rest. “The more significant the loss, the deeper and longer the recovery process,” said AARP.

Expect a variety of emotions, not just sadness: According to the AARP, “your feelings can run as a whole from sad to angry to hopeless to the occasional look of happiness – and come back again. If you could only feel sad, you would be trapped in endless despair.”

Don’t hide from people: “Grief is a fairly lonely process without also isolating yourself,” says AARP. Try your best to connect with friends and family and let them help. “When caregivers accept the idea that seeing friends makes them tougher, they no longer feel guilty for having fun,” association word.

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Studies ratify the linkage of processed meat to cardiovascular disease and mortality | Instant News


Hamilton, ON (March 31, 2021) – A global study led by Hamilton scientists found a link between eating processed meat and a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. The same study did not find the same association with unprocessed red meat or poultry.

The information comes from the diets and health outcomes of 134,297 people from 21 countries on five continents, which the researchers tracked for data on meat consumption and cardiovascular disease.

After following participants for nearly a decade, the researchers found that consumption of 150 grams or more of processed meat a week was associated with a 46 percent higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease and a 51 percent higher risk of death than those who did not eat processed meat. meat.

However, the researchers also found moderate consumption of unprocessed meat had a neutral effect on health.

“Evidence for a link between meat intake and cardiovascular disease is inconsistent. We therefore wanted to better understand the relationship between intake of unprocessed red meat, poultry and processed meat and the incidence of major cardiovascular disease and mortality, ”said Romaina Iqbal, the book’s first author. research and professor at Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan.

“The totality of available data suggests that eating a small amount of unprocessed meat as part of a healthy diet is unlikely to be harmful,” said Mahshid Dehghan, a researcher with the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University and Hamilton Health. Science.

The Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study was launched in 2003 and is the first multinational study to provide information on the relationship between unprocessed and processed meat intake and health outcomes from low, middle and high income countries.

“The PURE study examined a much more diverse population and broad dietary patterns, enabling us to provide new evidence that differentiates between the effects of processed and unprocessed meat,” said senior author Salim Yusuf, executive director of PHRI.

The participants’ eating habits were recorded using a food frequency questionnaire, while data was also collected on their mortality and major cardiovascular disease events. This allowed the researchers to determine the relationship between meat consumption patterns and the incidence of cardiovascular disease and mortality.

The authors believe that additional research could improve current understanding of the relationship between meat consumption and health outcomes. For example, it is unclear what study participants with a lower intake of meat than meat ate, and whether the quality of these diets differed between countries.

Non-meat substitutes may have implications in further interpreting the relationship between meat consumption and health outcomes. Nonetheless, the study authors believe their findings “suggest that limiting processed meat intake should be encouraged.”

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Editor:

Mahshid Dehghan picture is attached.

For more information:

Veronica McGuire

Media relations

Faculty of Health Sciences

Location: HSC-2E47

phone: (905) 525-9140 x 22169

email: [email protected]

McMaster University | A Brighter World

Rejection: AAAS and EurekAlert! is not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing to or for the use of any information via the EurekAlert system.

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Studies ratify the linkage of processed meat to cardiovascular disease and mortality | Instant News


Hamilton, ON (March 31, 2021) – A global study led by Hamilton scientists found a link between eating processed meat and a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. The same study did not find the same association with unprocessed red meat or poultry.

The information comes from the diets and health outcomes of 134,297 people from 21 countries on five continents, which the researchers tracked for data on meat consumption and cardiovascular disease.

After following participants for nearly a decade, the researchers found that consumption of 150 grams or more of processed meat a week was associated with a 46 percent higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease and a 51 percent higher risk of death than those who did not eat processed meat. meat.

However, the researchers also found moderate consumption of unprocessed meat had a neutral effect on health.

“Evidence for a link between meat intake and cardiovascular disease is inconsistent. We therefore wanted to better understand the relationship between intake of unprocessed red meat, poultry and processed meat and the incidence of major cardiovascular disease and mortality, ”said Romaina Iqbal, the book’s first author. research and professor at Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan.

“The totality of available data suggests that eating a small amount of unprocessed meat as part of a healthy diet is unlikely to be harmful,” said Mahshid Dehghan, a researcher with the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University and Hamilton Health. Science.

The Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study was launched in 2003 and is the first multinational study to provide information on the relationship between unprocessed and processed meat intake and health outcomes from low, middle and high income countries.

“The PURE study examined a much more diverse population and broad dietary patterns, enabling us to provide new evidence that differentiates between the effects of processed and unprocessed meat,” said senior author Salim Yusuf, executive director of PHRI.

The participants’ eating habits were recorded using a food frequency questionnaire, while data was also collected on their mortality and major cardiovascular disease events. This allowed the researchers to determine the relationship between meat consumption patterns and the incidence of cardiovascular disease and mortality.

The authors believe that additional research could improve current understanding of the relationship between meat consumption and health outcomes. For example, it is unclear what study participants with a lower intake of meat than meat ate, and whether the quality of these diets differed between countries.

Non-meat substitutes may have implications in further interpreting the relationship between meat consumption and health outcomes. Nonetheless, the study authors believe their findings “suggest that limiting processed meat intake should be encouraged.”

###

Editor:

Mahshid Dehghan picture is attached.

For more information:

Veronica McGuire

Media relations

Faculty of Health Sciences

Location: HSC-2E47

phone: (905) 525-9140 x 22169

email: [email protected]

McMaster University | A Brighter World

Rejection: AAAS and EurekAlert! is not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing to or for the use of any information via the EurekAlert system.

.



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PM to open the Peshawar Institute of Cardiology today | Instant News


PESHAWAR: This is a dream come true for the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa community as the long overdue Peshawar Institute of Cardiology (PIC) is ready and Prime Minister Imran Khan will officially open it to patients today.

“The PIC is ready and Prime Minister Imran Khan will come to Peshawar today to inaugurate it,” Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Health Minister Taimur Saleem Jhagra told The News on Tuesday.

Former Chief Secretary of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Mohammad Azam Khan and his successor Dr Kazim Niaz played a key role in the formation of the PIC by managing funds and equipment procurement.

Prof Shahkar Ahmad Shah, PIC’s medical director, told reporters a few days ago that they had almost completed the recruitment process and most of the equipment had arrived and was being installed.

Prof Shahkar, a cardiac surgeon, was declared the pioneer of heart surgery in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa when he performed the first heart surgery at Lady Reading Hospital (LRH). He stated that PIC will have a total of 262 beds, but they plan to start from 160 beds, including all critical services.

Although PIC has six operating theaters and six Cath laboratories, Prof Shahkar and his team decided to launch services from Cath’s three operating theaters and three laboratories. “A number of skilled cardiac surgeons and qualified cardiologists have joined us and we will start cardiac surgery at PIC in a few days,” Prof Shahkar told The News. He said 70-80 percent of heart patients used to travel to other places outside KP for heart surgery due to a lack of proper arrangements in the province, especially in public sector hospitals.

After the PIC was completed, he said that they have plans to set up similar heart centers in Abbottabad, Mardan, Swat, etc. This is a long and painful story that delays the completion of the PIC. Consecutive incompetence, negligence and wrong priorities of the government in the KP caused delays.

The foundation stone for the 300-bed heart hospital was laid by then chief minister Muhammad Akram Khan Durrani when Muttahida Majlis-e-Amal (MMA) was in power. Akram Durrani used to take credit for the hospital but failed to make progress on the project.

The coalition government of the Awami National Party (ANP) -Partai People’s Party of Pakistan (PPP) and the Pakistan-led Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) also ignored the project. Funds are pending for the project and part of the money intended for the PIC is diverted to the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project.

Instead, construction work was launched at the Rawalpindi Institute of Cardiology in 2010 and the hospital started functioning in 2012. It is a center of excellence, providing quality care to heart patients.

There are no special heart disease centers in KP and Fata. In Punjab, there are four heart hospitals in Lahore, Multan, Rawalpindi and Faisalabad. LRH and HMC are only public sector hospitals that have heart units but they are not sufficient to meet the needs of a population of more than 30 million in the province. When the cardiac surgery department at LRH closed two years ago, the entire burden fell on the HMC where Dr Mohammad Aasim performed the surgery alone.

Two projects, the 300-bed Peshawar Institute of Cardiology (PIC) and the 120-bed Burn and Trauma Center, started in KP but took more than a decade to complete due to successive lack of interest from provincial governments.

The Burns and Trauma Center was completed in 2018 and that was also when USAID provided funds for equipment procurement. The PTI government arranged funds to complete the remaining civilian work and employed the most up-to-date burn and trauma center staff at KP, where excellent facilities were offered to patients free of charge.

Apart from the others, former chief secretaries of Mohammad Azam Khan and Prof Mohammad Tahir Khan played a key role in arranging funds and equipment for the burn center. Apart from being underfunded, the PIC was also postponed due to vested interests. Private hospitals in Peshawar are also against the PIC because they fear it will affect their business.

Another factor behind the delay is litigation. Certain people encouraged Dr Hussain Ahmad Haroon, self-proclaimed president of the Pakistan Medical Association (PMA), to challenge the issue when PIC was declared part of the Lady Reading Hospital (LRH) Board of Governors (BoG) chaired by Dr. Nausherwan Burki.

In fact, Dr Burki wants to use his influence and arrange funding for the PIC and other long overdue projects in LRH, the medical and allied services building. He took a personal interest and completed a sophisticated seven-story building called the new LRH. This adds a great look to the historic LRH. The BoG in 2018 advertised specific positions for PICs and elected doctors, most of whom served in the best heart centers abroad when the General Elections Commission of Pakistan (ECP) announced elections in July 2018 and banned hiring by the federal and provincial governments to ensure transparency in polls opinion.

The ECP decision is irrelevant because the election date was not set at that time. Some of the 25 shortlisted candidates have reached Peshawar for interviews from abroad and others are lined up in the US, Canada and the UK.

They were notified only one day before the cancellation of the interview. They were very disappointed that they refused to come and join PIC when another BoG in 2020 advertised the position.

Dr Nausherwan Burki has planned to bring Pakistani doctors who are trained with modern equipment in the best heart centers in developed countries. PIC has special protection for cardiovascular and cardiovascular super specialties and functions not only as a service provider but also as a training and research center. Under the direction of the Peshawar High Court (PHC), the government then established a separate Board of Governors (BoG) for the PIC, led by renowned Karachi-based cardiologist Dr Abdul Bari Khan under the Institute for Medical Teaching law.

The BoG then selected Prof. Shahkar Ahmad Shah as medical director for PIC. He gave up a lucrative job at a private hospital and joined PIC to serve people in his province. Within a short span of time, he assembled his team and installed equipment to open them up to patients.

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Signs of MoU for Pediatric Cardiology Ward renovation & equipment on nicvd | Instant News



KARACHI: The National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NICVD) has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the American Pakistan Business Development Forum and Rotary Club of Karachi Crown to support NICVD in renovating the Pediatric Cardiology Ward and providing state-of-the-art facilities in model rooms.

The MoU was signed by Professor Nadeem Qamar (Executive Director, NICVD), Dr. Abdul Sattar Shaikh (Paediactric Cardiologist, NICVD), Mr. Zeeshan Altaf Lohya (Co-Founder & Chairman, AMPAK-BDF and Assistant Governor & President, Rotary Club Karachi Crown) and Mr. Nasser Wajahat (Co-Founder & Secretary General, AMPAK-BDF and Secretary General of the Rotary Club Karachi Crown).

The ceremony was also attended by NICVD Professors, Doctors and Management. Abdul Sattar Shaikh who then gave a tour to the guests of the Children’s Ward and various areas of the hospital.

According to the agreement, the Rotary Club of Karachi Crown and the American Pakistan Business Development Forum in collaboration with NICVD will renovate 2 ward entry rooms with one model room for a children’s ward which has 12 beds and will provide bunk beds, creating an atmosphere and state of the facilities-the- art in the model room. ***

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