Tag Archives: cell biology

Science Advisory Board | Instant News


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COVID-19 has long-term effects on the biotechnology industry

January 5, 2021 – The COVID-19 pandemic will have far-reaching and lasting effects on the biotechnology industry, according to speakers at a January 5 presentation held ahead of the virtual Biotech Showcase being held on January 11-15. Biotech companies have been swirling around on a large scale pursuing infectious disease research – and not all of them will succeed.
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An allergic reaction to the COVID-19 vaccine should not stop vaccination

January 4, 2021 – The COVID-19 vaccine currently approved for emergency use by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is safe even among people with food or drug allergies, according to allergists from Massachusetts General Hospital. A review of all relevant information is published on Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice on December 31st.
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Top 10 ScienceBoard stories for 2020

21 December 2020 – For many of us, 2020 didn’t go according to plan. The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic has drastically changed our daily lives. Right here at ScienceBoard.net, we have provided our readers with timely and evidence-based information regarding COVID-19, as well as many other topics in the biopharmaceutical and life sciences industry.
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The FDA issued the EUA for the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine

18 December 2020 – Just one day after the committee’s favorable recommendation, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for the COVID-19 messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine from Moderna. The company’s mRNA-1273 vaccine is now the second COVID-19 vaccine on the US market, after vaccines from Pfizer and BioNTech were administered EUA last week.
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New discoveries could produce broad-spectrum antivirals

18 December 2020 – Scientists have identified key human genes that cells need to consume and destroy viruses. Research results are published in Natural on December 16 and could demonstrate new treatments to target viral infections, including COVID-19.
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The FDA committee voted in favor of the Moderna COVID-19 EUA vaccine

17 December 2020 – Moderna’s COVID-19 messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine candidate, mRNA-1273, received favorable recommendations on December 17 from an advisory committee for the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The OK Committee means that mRNA-1273 may receive emergency use authorization (EUA) within a few days.
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The new immunotherapy supports the polio vaccine to treat cancer

17 December 2020 – As if we needed another reason to get vaccinated, researchers have developed technology that uses the polio vaccine to help treat cancer in those who later develop the disease. The technology, developed at Duke University and developed by Istari Oncology, uses the antigen produced by the polio vaccine to trigger the immune system to eat away at targeted cancer cells.
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The genes provide new targets for COVID-19 therapy

15 December 2020 – Genes associated with antiviral immunity and lung inflammation have been linked to severe cases of COVID-19 in a new genome analysis carried out in the UK. The result, published in Natural on December 11, revealed new therapeutic targets for drug reuse and development efforts.
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Global health R&D has stalled as resources shifted to COVID-19

December 14, 2020 – The current coronavirus pandemic has slowed progress in research and development (R&D) on neglected diseases and other long-term global health challenges by disrupting ongoing research and directing resources to the work of COVID-19, according to a new report released on December 11. by the nonprofit Global Health Technologies Coalition.
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The FDA issued the EUA for Pfizer’s vaccine, BioNTech COVID-19

12 December 2020 – The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. This step comes after the FDA’s Vaccines and Biological Products Advisory Committee issued positive recommendations for the vaccine.

Google’s DeepMind is making a quantum leap in solving the problem of protein folding

11 December 2020 – Artificial intelligence has made breakthroughs in protein structure prediction. The results come as part of the 14th Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction, a friendly contest and conference organized by the Protein Structure Prediction Center with sponsorship from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, part of the US National Institutes of Health.
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Science Advisory Board | Instant News


Science Advisory Board<br />

The FDA committee voted in favor of the Moderna COVID-19 EUA vaccine

17 December 2020 – Moderna’s COVID-19 messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine candidate, mRNA-1273, today received favorable recommendations from the advisory committee for the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The OK Committee means that mRNA-1273 may receive emergency use authorization (EUA) within a few days.
Discuss

The new immunotherapy supports the polio vaccine to treat cancer

17 December 2020 – As if we needed another reason to get vaccinated, researchers have developed technology that uses the polio vaccine to help treat cancer in those who later develop the disease. The technology, developed at Duke University and developed by Istari Oncology, uses the antigen produced by the polio vaccine to trigger the immune system to eat away at targeted cancer cells.
Discuss

The genes provide new targets for COVID-19 therapy

15 December 2020 – Genes linked to antiviral immunity and lung inflammation have been linked to severe cases of COVID-19 in a new genome analysis carried out in the UK. The result, published in Natural on December 11, revealed new therapeutic targets for drug reuse and development efforts.
Discuss

Global health R&D has stalled as resources shifted to COVID-19

December 14, 2020 – The current coronavirus pandemic has slowed progress in research and development (R&D) on neglected diseases and other long-term global health challenges by disrupting ongoing research and directing resources to the work of COVID-19, according to a new report released on December 11. by the nonprofit Global Health Technologies Coalition.
Discuss

The FDA issued the EUA for Pfizer’s vaccine, BioNTech COVID-19

12 December 2020 – The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. This step comes after the FDA’s Vaccines and Biological Products Advisory Committee issued positive recommendations for the vaccine.

Google’s DeepMind is making a quantum leap in solving the problem of protein folding

11 December 2020 – Artificial intelligence has made breakthroughs in protein structure prediction. The results come as part of the 14th Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction, a friendly contest and conference organized by the Protein Structure Prediction Center with sponsorship from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, part of the US National Institutes of Health.
Discuss

The FDA committee approved the transfer of Pfizer, the BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to EUA

December 10, 2020 – Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine candidate, BNT162b2, passed an important milestone today when the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee determined that the candidate’s benefits in preventing COVID-19 outweigh the risks. The committee’s advice is likely to lead to the issuance of an emergency use authorization (EUA) for vaccines by the FDA within days.
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The new study found the SARS-CoV-2 antibodies disappeared rapidly

8 December 2020 – Antibodies developed after being infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus disappeared rapidly, according to an analysis published in Immunology Science on December 7th. These findings may suggest that SARS-CoV-2 infection may not offer long-term immunity from subsequent reinfection with the virus.
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The new universal flu vaccine targets conserved areas of viral surface proteins

December 7, 2020 – A new universal influenza vaccine has been developed that targets the surface protein stem of the influenza virus rather than the head. This vaccine, which is capable of neutralizing various strains of influenza, was evaluated in a phase I clinical study whose results were published in Natural Medicine on December 7th.
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Regulatory Roundup: The appointment is made before the end of the year

December 7, 2020 – This week’s Regulatory Roundup covers activities from November 30 to December 4 and is filled with breakthroughs, orphans, and rare disease appointments from the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. Several cancer, immunotherapy, and vaccine companies also submitted biological licensing applications to advance their candidates.
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Genetic secrets of the bat “superpower” identified | Instant News


Today ferrumequinum the greater horseshoe bat

First, the raw material of genetic material that codes for bats unique tools and powers such as the ability to fly, to use sound to move silently in complete darkness, to survive and endure deadly diseases and resist aging and cancer – has been fully revealed and published in Nature.

Bat1Ka global consortium of scientists led by Dr. Sonia Verne and Professor Emma Tealing, devoted to sequencing the genomes of each of the 1,421 living bat species has generated and analyzed six high-precision bat genomes, which are ten times bigger than any bat, genome, published today in order to begin to uncover the “bats” with their unique traits.

Senior author Dr. Sonia Vern co-founder, Director of bat-1K, the max Planck Institute for psycholinguistics and the newly appointed UKRI officer of the University of St Andrews, said: “this is the first reference-quality genome of bats. Having such a complete and well-annotated genomes allowed us an unprecedented understanding of the genetic and evolutionary abilities is seen in bats”.

Professor Emma Teeling, University College Dublin, co-founder and Director Bat1K and senior author of the study, added: “Given these fine genome of a bat, we can now better understand how bats carry viruses, and slow the aging process, and evolved flight and echolocation. These genomes are the tools required to identify genetic solutions to turned into bats, which, ultimately, can be used to mitigate human aging and disease.”

Photo By Daniel Whitby
Today ferrumeqinum the greater horseshoe bat

To create these bat genomes, the team used new technology to sequence the DNA of a bat and has developed new methods to gather these fragments in the correct order and to identify the genes present.

The team compared the genomes of bat 42 other mammals to contact the unresolved question of where the bats are in the mammalian tree of life.

With the help of new phylogenetic methods and complex molecular data, the researchers found the strongest support for bats, being most closely related to a group called Ferreuungulata, which consists of predators (which includes dogs, cats and seals, among other species), lizards, whales and ungulates (hoofed mammals).

To identify the genomic changes that contribute to the unique adaptations found in bats, the team systematically searched for gene differences between bats and other mammals, identifying regions of the genome that have evolved differently in bats and the loss and genes that might drive bats unique features.

The researchers also found evidence that the ability of bats carry the virus is reflected in their genomes. Exquisite genomes revealed a “fossil viruses”, the evidence to survive after a viral infections, and showed that the genome of the bat contained a greater diversity than other species that genomic record of historical tolerance to viral infection.

Given the quality of the bat genome, the team identified and tested several non-coding regulatory regions, which can adjust the key of the bats of evolutionary innovations.

These are just the beginning of the work of the group. The remaining ~live bat exhibit 1400 species of incredible diversity in ecology, longevity, sensory perception and immunology, and many questions still remain regarding the genomic basis of these impressive features. The purpose Bat1K to answer these questions, as more and more bat genomes sequenced, further revealing the genetic basis of “bats” a rare and amazing superpowers.

Photos Oliver Farcy
Greater mouse eared bat

Professor Eugene Myers, Director of the max Planck Institute of molecular cell biology and genetics and Center for systems biology, Dresden, Germany, lead author, said: “using the latest modern technologies of DNA sequencing and new computational methods for such data, we are 96-99% on each bit of the genome at the chromosome level reconstruction of unprecedented quality akin to, for example, the current genome reference, which is the result of more than ten years of intensive “finishing” work. As such, these bat genomes provide an excellent basis for experimentation and evolutionary studies of the fascinating bats of abilities and physiological properties.”

Dr. Michael Hiller, Max Planck head of the research group of the max Planck Institute of molecular cell biology and genetics in Dresden, the max Planck Institute for physics of complex systems, and Center systems biology, Dresden, senior author of the study: “our genome scan detected hearing loss genes, which may contribute to echolocation that bats use to navigate and hunt in complete darkness. Additionally, we found expansion of anti-viral genes, a unique selection on the immune genes, and the loss of genes involved in inflammation in bats. These changes may contribute to bats exceptional immunity and indicates their tolerance of coronaviruses”.

This study was partially funded by the max Planck Society, European research Council, Irish research Council and the program of the human frontier science, the NSF.

Dr. Vern to bring in £1.5 m seven-year study in the University of St Andrews on the way bats communicate, to shed light on the evolution of human language.

Funding announced UKRI future leaders scholarships the scheme will allow Dr. Sonia Verne to study the vocalizations of bats, and by matching them with other mammals, to more clearly understand mechanisms by which human language evolved.

£1.5 m grant will Fund the first four years of the seven-year project and further funding to follow.

Future Leaders Scholarships this £ 900 million, helping to establish the careers of world-class research and innovation through the leaders of UK business and academia.

Photo Brock Sheri
Phyllostomus discolor pale spear nose bat

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