Tag Archives: cough

Made more-ratings fever as a symptom affects the initial Covid-19 the answer? Yes, says study OIMN | Instant News


Police received a sample of a nasal swab taken for Covid-19 test at the government fever hospital in Hyderabad on July 23, 2020. (AP photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)

A study conducted by the gateway of India shows that in the early days of the pandemic in March-April, only 17% of patients fever.

  • CNN-News18 New Delhi
  • Last Update: July 25, 2020, 1:04 PM ist

We missed Covid-19 patients in the first days of the pandemic? Possible. A study conducted by all India Institute of medical Sciences (AIIMS) now shows that fever was never a predominant symptom of the disease caused by a coronavirus.

A study published in the scientific research arm ICMR, Indian journal of medical research (IJMR), shows that in the early days of the pandemic in March-April, only 17% of patients fever.

Research on 144 patients was conducted from 23 March to 15 April in new Delhi-Qutab Minar. Research paper topic ‘clinical and demographic profile and in-hospital outcomes of Covid-19 patients hospitalized in a center of tertiary care in Northern India, was in collaboration with the Director, Dr Randeep Guleria from 28 others.

“The fever is present in only 17% of our patients, which was much less compared to other reports worldwide, including Chinese cohort, which is 44%, the temperature at the time of presentation and 88% had fever during the stay in the hospital,” the research work is carried out News18 said.

He continues to add that 44% of patients were asymptomatic at the time of admission. A large number of asymptomatic patients of both good and bad news. While on the one hand it shows that many patients develop an immunity to the infection, it also shows that in March-April, was a silent spreaders.

Both public and commercial institutions, including airports, hospitals, shopping centers, relied heavily on thermal body scan and manual thermometers to regulate the movement of people in the early days of the pandemic, questioning the effectiveness of the transition, when the fever is not the dominant symptom.

The aim of the study was to describe clinical and demographic characteristics and in hospital outcomes Covid groups-19 patients in North India.

The average age of the 144 patients was about 40 years old, with 93.1% of men and included 10 foreigners. Domestic travel to or from affected countries (77.1%) and close contact with Covid-19 patients in the community (82.6%) are the most commonly documented exposure.

Nine patients were smokers, while comorbidities were present in 23 patients, of which diabetes was the most common health.

A significant proportion (about 44%) patients had no symptoms. Those who had the symptoms complained of cough as the most common symptom, while fever was the most unusual. Nasal symptoms were present in 2% of patients. The majority of patients is maintenance treatment with hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin is given in each case. Requires only five patients, oxygen, four required intensive care, and one required mechanical ventilation and mortality occurred in two patients. Patients recovered in 16-18 days, said the study.

Speaking to News18, Dr Randeep Guleria said that every day is a learning process and that there needs to be a wider lens to study the symptoms Covid-19. Infection is much more systematic than what was earlier believed, he said.

“We had young people with strokes and they were Covid-19 patients. We have had patients with a heart attack, which was Covid-19 patients. I had a patient who came to me with diarrhea, no respiratory symptoms, and he thought that due to blocking drinking water he consumed was not fresh, which leads to diarrhea. He has no respiratory symptoms. He continues to have diarrhea for five to seven days. We see Covid-19 patients with conjunctivitis, the eye damage. These extrapulmonary manifestations and we should have a high index of suspicion and low threshold for testing as we go along”, he added.

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Cough drops longer in humid and cold climates, you can drive up to 13 feet | Instant News


Respiratory droplets from a cough for longer in wet, cold climates

Depending on weather conditions, some droplets to travel between eight feet and 13 feet from their source to boil, even without the wind. This means that without masks, six feet social distance may not be enough.

  • Mans
  • Last Update: July 21, 2020, 1:52 PM ist

The research of American scientists of Indian origin discovered that respiratory droplets from coughing or sneezing travel farther and longer in wet, cold climates than in hot and dry.

The research team developed this new model to better understand the role of droplet clouds play in the spread of respiratory viruses, the study, published in the journal physics of fluids.

Their model is the first to be based on the fundamental approach to the study of chemical reactions called the theory the collision rate, which looks at the interaction and collision of cloud droplets exhaled a sick person with healthy people.

Their work links the population-the extent of human interaction with their micro-scale physics drops the results on how far and fast by airborne droplets, and how long they last.

“The fundamental chemical reactions, two molecules collide. How often they meet will give you how fast the reaction is progressing,” said study author Abhishek CAA, University of California, USA.

“It’s exactly the same here, how often do healthy people come in contact with an infected cloud droplets can be a measure of how quickly a disease can spread,” Saha added.

They found that depending on weather conditions, some droplets to travel between eight feet and 13 feet from their source to boil, even without the wind.

This means that without masks, six feet social distance may not be enough to keep one person exhaled particles from reaching someone else.

“Physics of droplets depends significantly on the weather. If you are in a cold, humid climate, the droplets from the sneeze or cough to last longer and spread farther than if you’re in a hot dry climate, where it evaporates faster,” said SAA.

“We included these parameters in our model, the spread of infection; they are not included in existing models, as far as we can tell,” he said.

The researchers hope that their more complete model, the rate of infection and spread of the droplet will help health policy development at the local level, and can be used in the future to better understand the role of environmental factors in the spread of the virus.

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Pottawattamie County sees third COVID-19 related deaths, 7 new positive cases News | Instant News


Another resident of Pottawattamie District has died in connection with the COVID-19 pandemic.

Pottawattamie County Public Health reported the third COVID-19 related death in the county – Wednesday afternoon. The patient is an elderly man, aged 81 and older, from Council Bluffs who has a pre-existing medical condition.

“We regret reporting the third death related to COVID-19 in Pottawattamie County,” Matt Wyant said with Pottawattamie County Public Health. “Our deepest condolences with the families of these individuals.”

The district also reported seven new COVID-19 cases, all of which were residents of Council Bluffs. Three of the cases were 18-40 years old; both aged 41-60 years; and two are 61-80 years old. These people were tested between May 11 and May 18. So far, 2,191 Pottawattamie County residents have been tested for COVID-19, and a total of 189 have been tested positive.

An additional five people have recovered, bringing the total recovery to 96. At present, four people are hospitalized, 83 people isolate themselves. Based on investigations of PCPH contact tracing, a total of 63 Pottawattamie County COVID-19 cases were the result of community outreach.

For additional information on COVID-19, including demographics of cases filtered by county, visit the Iowa Department of Public Health’s COVID-19 dashboard in coronavirus.iowa.gov. The dashboard is updated daily and contains the total number of cases, recovery, death, tests carried out, and the Iowa epidemiological curve.

PCPH continues to investigate contact tracing for each COVID-19 case. If and when risks to the general public are identified, PCPH will publicly identify the location and communicate any action that must be taken publicly.

Because we have the spread of COVID-19 in the community, individuals must take precautions to protect themselves. Stay at home as much as possible, limit travel and shopping, practice social distance by staying at least six feet from other people. Wash hands and disinfect surfaces that are often touched several times per day. If you are sick, stay home.

Iowans are encouraged to go to testIowa.com and complete the assessment. TestIowa is an initiative designed to improve COVID-19 testing rates in Iowa. If you have COVID-19 symptoms or develop symptoms (fever, cough, shortness of breath), contact your health care provider before going to the doctor’s office or emergency room.

Look at the numbers in the region, based on data provided by countries and coronavirus.iowa.gov:

Pottawattamie County – 189 cases, 2,191 tests, 96 recovery, three deaths, 8% of those tested positive

Mills County – 13 cases, 516 tests, 10 recovery, 2.5%

Harrison County – 18 cases, 333 tests, 17 recovery, 5.4%

Shelby County – 24 cases, 230 tests, 20 recoveries, 10.9%

Montgomery County – five cases, 204 tests, five recoveries, 2.5%

Page County – 10 cases, 448 tests, nine recovery, 2.2%

Cass County – three cases, 255 tests, one recovery, 1.2%

Monona Region – 18 cases, 254 tests, 13 recoveries, 7.1%

Crawford County – 410 cases, 1,375 tests, 207 recovery, one death, 29.8%

Fremont County – four cases, 103 tests, two recoveries, 3.9%

At the regional Regional Medical Coordination Center four, which includes Pottawattamie, Mills, Harrison, Cass, Crawford, Shelby, Fremont, Montgomery, Page, Adams, Audubon and Taylor County, there are seven patients who are hospitalized. Four patients in intensive care. Two COVID-19 patients were hospitalized in the past 24 hours.

The region has 208 inpatient beds, 42 intensive care beds available and 67 ventilators available. No patient was admitted to the hospital using a ventilator.

The Governor of Iowa is opening a movie theater, zoo, and bar soon

Cinemas, museums, zoos and wedding receptions in Iowa will reopen on Friday, Governor Kim Reynolds said on Wednesday when he expressed confidence that the state could respond if there was an outbreak.

Reopening in time for Memorial Day activities is a state campsite toilet, bathroom and cabin. Campers will be allowed for tents and all campers, but playgrounds, shelter and visitor centers remain closed.

Reynolds said the bar could be reopened next week with a 50% capacity. He also said it was time for summer school-sponsored activities such as softball and baseball to continue on June 1 and that he would give more details Thursday about the school.

Reynolds said the country’s testing capabilities allowed officials to track and respond to any outbreaks that might occur.

Reynolds said he believes new cases and reports of death are stable, although the country continues to see around 200 to 300 new positive cases a day and a dozen deaths.

“We have shown that we have the resources to manage any kind of increase or increase,” he said.

Casinos are not included in the governor’s plan, and Reynolds said conversations were ongoing with the industry to determine how they would be reopened.

Modern toilets, cabins will open Memorial Day weekend in the Iowa state park

Iowa State Park will open modern restrooms, bath buildings and cabins starting Friday in time for Memorial Day weekend. This means the camp will be open to all campers, including RVs, pop-ups and tent camping. The youth group campsite will remain closed.

Customers need to call the local park office (for Backbone cabins, contact the Backbone concession holder) to rent a cabin with the earliest arrival date is Friday or Saturday. Additionally, a state park online reservation system will be available today for state park cabin / yurt rentals with a date of arrival no earlier than Sunday, if available and so on. Existing cabin / yurt bookings will be honored.

Shelter, huts, playgrounds, group camps, museums and visitor centers remain closed at this time.

Park visitors are reminded to avoid group meetings larger than 10. DNR park staff will continue to remind and educate visitors to practice maintaining physical distance while enjoying the park. Visitors must also be aware of the following guidelines:

• At the campsite, only camping with overnight bookings is permitted; no visitors.

• Only six occupants overnight per camp will be permitted, unless close relatives contain more than six.

• Picnic tables and grills are open for use at your own risk.

• The beach remains open, but will be watched closely.

• For cabin rentals, all kitchen utensils, such as plates, pans and pans, have been removed; tenants need to bring their own home. Additionally, the check-in time has been moved to 5 p.m. and check-out time is until 9 am (each from 4 am and 11 am) to allow for more cleaning between rentals.

• Some park and campsite areas may be closed due to construction or maintenance issues, so please check the specific closing information for each park before planning a camping trip.

For the latest closure information for state parks, campgrounds, and trails, visit: iowadnr.gov/places-to-go/state-parks/alerts-and-closures

Iowa has 68 state parks and 4 state forests for visitors to enjoy with hiking trails, lake recreation, and camping, to learn more visit: iowadnr.gov/places-to-go/state-parks or iowadnr.gov/things-to-do/camping

Strategic Air Command and Space Museum to be reopened to the public

After voluntarily closing March 16 in response to a rapidly developing situation with the COVID-19 novel coronavirus, the Strategic Air Command & Aerospace Museum has reopened its doors to the general public. The museum is open every day from 9 am to 5 pm. This includes all exhibitions, flight simulators, gift shops and SAC Lunch Café. In addition, Summer Camp programming will run according to schedule starting June 8.

Both guests and staff are required to wear masks at all times when visiting the museum. Signs and notifications throughout the museum are also made to remind guests and staff to exercise to maintain social distance. Visitors are asked to review additional guidelines and safety measures that apply to staff and guests on the museum’s website before visiting.

“This is an uncertain time for a museum with a twenty-five percent chance it will not reopen,” said Executive Director Jeff Cannon. “There is no doubt that tourism-oriented businesses such as museums, attractions, hotels and airlines will continue to have significant challenges over the next few years. I am proud to see the efforts made by our team in all departments. Within days of closing, the team turned to a new normal, adapted and planned our future by offering virtual programs in the main pillars of education, veterans, and the community. And in preparation for reopening, the team has implemented current guidelines to ensure the safety of staff and visitors. “

To show appreciation for those who have served at the forefront during this crisis, the museum extends free entry to all health workers, active military and veterans and First Respondents this Memorial Day weekend.

“Museum staff have worked very hard to provide a safe environment for our visitors. Offering free entrance tickets to these frontline workers along with peace of mind that they can enjoy their time here, means a lot to us. We are proud to provide this opportunity, “said John Lefler, Jr., marketing manager for the museum.

Information on visitor guides and upcoming museum events is available at sacmuseum.org.

Information about COVID-19

Pottawattamie District Public Health says every day: “Because we have the spread of COVID-19 in the community, individuals must take precautions to protect themselves. Stay at home as much as possible, limit travel and shopping. If you have to leave home, practice keeping a social distance, and stay at least 6 feet from others. Wash hands and disinfect surfaces that are often touched several times per day. If you are sick, alone at home. “

Symptoms in people who have been exposed to the con virus can include fever, coughing and shortness of breath, according to the Iowa Department of Public Health. The symptoms can appear only in two days or as long as 14 days after exposure. Most people experience mild or moderate symptoms that go away in two to three weeks.

Older adults and people with existing health problems are among those who are very susceptible to more severe illnesses, including pneumonia.

The testing criteria are based on guidance from the Iowa Hygienic Lab or private laboratory guidelines. Pottawattamie’s Regional Public Health has no role in deciding who does and is not tested.

Public health officials recommend:

  • Stay home as much as possible.
  • Monitor the symptoms for yourself.
  • Contact your doctor if symptoms appear.
  • Cover the cough and sneeze with a tissue or upper arm / elbow.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched.

The Methodist Health System offers a community hotline and screening tool at 402-815-SICK (7425). CHI Health has an assistance channel to answer questions and direct patients who may be at high risk for coronavirus. Visit chihealth.com for information.

The Pottawattamie District Emergency Management Agency has a COVID-19 call center that is open from 8 am to 4 pm. Monday to Friday 712-890-5368 or 712-890-5369.

For those who struggle with mental health during a pandemic, yourlifeiowa.org has several resources, including a hotline at 855-581-8111 and a text friendly line at 855-895-8398. In addition, the Hope 4 Iowa Crisis Hotline connects individuals in crisis to the hands that help with resources to overcome and improve mental health. Hotlines are available 24 hours a day. Call 84-HOPE-4-IOWA (844-673-4469).

The University of Nebraska Medical Center has a COVID-19 – COVID 1-Check screening application, allowing users to answer a series of questions and assess their likelihood of having COVID-19. Based on user input, the screening application will issue a “low risk,” “urgent risk” or “emergent risk” assessment and guide the individual towards the next possible steps.

Besides, open it coronavirus.iow.gov, pcema-ia.org, and / or cdc.gov for more information.

– Associated Press reporter David Pitt and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources contributed to this report.

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Pottawattamie County saw 11 new COVID-19 cases; new county total at 182 | News | Instant News


Pottawattami District Public Health reported 11 new COVID-19 cases Tuesday. Nine are residents of Council Bluffs and PCPH are in the process of verifying the remaining two addresses.

One case was a child (0-17); four cases aged 18-40 years; five aged 41-60 years; and one is 61-80 years old. These people were tested between May 9 and May 18. So far, 2,121 Pottawattamie County residents have been tested for COVID-19, and a total of 182 have been tested positive.

An additional 12 people have recovered bringing the total recovery to 86. At present, four people are hospitalized and 88 are alone. Based on investigations of PCPH contact tracing, a total of 57 COVID-Pottawattamie County cases were the result of community dissemination.

For additional information on COVID-19, including demographics of cases filtered by county, visit the Iowa Department of Public Health’s COVID-19 dashboard in coronavirus.iowa.gov. The dashboard is updated daily and contains the total number of cases, recovery, death, tests carried out, and the Iowa epidemiological curve.

Iowans are encouraged to go to testiowa.com and complete the assessment.

TestIowa is an initiative designed to improve COVID-19 testing rates in Iowa. If you have COVID-19 symptoms or develop symptoms (fever, cough, shortness of breath), contact your health care provider before going to the doctor’s office or emergency room.

Look at the numbers in the region, based on data provided by countries and coronavirus.iowa.gov:

Pottawattamie County – 182 cases, 2,121 tests, 86 recovery, 8.2% of those tested tested positive again

Mills County – 12 cases, 485 tests, nine recovery, 2.5%

Harrison County – 18 cases, 329 tests, 17 recoveries, 5.5%

Shelby County – 24 cases, 222 tests, 19 recoveries, 10.8%

Montgomery County – five cases, 200 tests, five recoveries, 2.5%

Page County – 10 cases, 446 tests, nine recovery, 2.2%

Cass County – two cases, 240 tests, one recovery, 0.8%

Monona Region – 16 cases, 250 tests, 13 recoveries, 6.4%

Crawford County – 396 cases, 1,299 tests, 190 recoveries, one death, 30.5%

Fremont County – four cases, 101 tests, one recovery, 4.0%

At the regional Regional Medical Coordination Center four, which includes Pottawattamie, Mills, Harrison, Cass, Crawford, Shelby, Fremont, Montgomery, Page, Adams, Audubon and Taylor County, there are five patients who are hospitalized. Three patients in intensive care.

This region has 227 inpatient beds available, 40 intensive care beds available and 68 ventilators available. No patient was admitted to the hospital using a ventilator.

2020 Railroad Days was canceled because of COVID-19

The annual Railroad Days event has been canceled due to the current COVID-19 pandemic.

In a joint press release issued this morning, officials from the Union Pacific Railroad Museum, RailsWest Railroad Museum, Historic General Dodge House, Lauritzen Gardens and The Durham Museum, said they made “a difficult decision to cancel the event for the sake of public safety. . “

“With great regret we have to cancel this popular event that brings people together to celebrate the rich railroad heritage in our region. Given the size and scope of the event, we feel it is a responsible decision to keep everyone safe, “Christi Janssen, executive director of the Durham Museum, said in its release.

The next Railway Day is set for July 10-11, 2021.

Additional information about Days Train can be found at omaharailroaddays.com.

Reynolds is considering allowing more public activities in Iowa

Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds said on Tuesday that he was considering whether to allow additional activities to continue because his proclamation currently bans social, community, recreational, recreational and sporting events and more than 10 people end next week.

“We continue to see positive trends and will continue to monitor that and look for opportunities to continue to bring more online businesses,” he said.

While Reynolds recently allowed restaurants, fitness centers, malls, hair salons, barber shops and tanning facilities to be reopened with restrictions on close contact and customer volume, he continued closing for many other businesses. These businesses include bars, casinos, movie theaters, bingo halls, bowling arenas, billiard rooms, arcades and amusement parks.

His statement ends on May 27.

The state health official reported more than 300 new positive cases Tuesday and 12 additional deaths, bringing the country’s total to 15,296 known positive cases and 367 deaths.

Reynolds also said he would ask the federal government for an extension of the order allowing the National Guard forces to assist with the state corona virus response mission while being paid with federal funds. The initial extension on the order validated their assignment until June and Reynolds said he planned to look for a possible extension until the end of July.

Information about COVID-19

Pottawattamie District Public Health says every day: “Because we have the spread of COVID-19 in the community, individuals must take precautions to protect themselves. Stay at home as much as possible, limit travel and shopping. If you have to leave home, practice keeping a social distance, and stay at least 6 feet from others. Wash hands and disinfect surfaces that are often touched several times per day. If you are sick, alone at home. “

Symptoms in people who have been exposed to the con virus can include fever, coughing and shortness of breath, according to the Iowa Department of Public Health. The symptoms can appear only in two days or as long as 14 days after exposure. Most people experience mild or moderate symptoms that go away in two to three weeks.

Older adults and people with existing health problems are among those who are very susceptible to more severe illnesses, including pneumonia.

The testing criteria are based on guidance from the Iowa Hygienic Lab or private laboratory guidelines. Pottawattamie’s Regional Public Health has no role in deciding who does and is not tested.

Public health officials recommend:

  • Stay home as much as possible.
  • Monitor the symptoms for yourself.
  • Contact your doctor if symptoms appear.
  • Cover the cough and sneeze with a tissue or upper arm / elbow.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched.

The Methodist Health System offers a community hotline and screening tool at 402-815-SICK (7425). CHI Health has an assistance channel to answer questions and direct patients who may be at high risk for coronavirus. Visit chihealth.com for information.

The Pottawattamie District Emergency Management Agency has a COVID-19 call center that is open from 8 am to 4 pm. Monday to Friday 712-890-5368 or 712-890-5369.

For those who struggle with mental health during a pandemic, yourlifeiowa.org has several resources, including a hotline at 855-581-8111 and a text friendly line at 855-895-8398. In addition, the Hope 4 Iowa Crisis Hotline connects individuals in crisis to the hands that help with resources to overcome and improve mental health. Hotlines are available 24 hours a day. Call 84-HOPE-4-IOWA (844-673-4469).

The University of Nebraska Medical Center has a COVID-19 – COVID 1-Check screening application, allowing users to answer a series of questions and assess their likelihood of having COVID-19. Based on user input, the screening application will issue a “low risk,” “urgent risk” or “emergent risk” assessment and guide the individual towards the next possible steps.

Besides, open it coronavirus.iow.gov, pcema-ia.org, and / or cdc.gov for more information.

– Associated Press reporter David Pitt contributed to this report.

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Talking Produces Coronavirus Drops That Can Last In The Air For Up To 14 Minutes | Instant News


Coughing and sneezing may not be the only way individuals transmit infectious pathogens including novel coronaviruses that kill each other. Talking also has the potential to launch thousands of tiny aerosol particles so small that they remain suspended in the air for eight to 14 minutes, the latest research says.

Research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences may explain how individuals with mild or impossible symptoms infect other people they come to nearby places including offices, homes, cruises, and other confined spaces.

However, this finding needs to be replicated in real world circumstances. Researchers do not really understand the amount of virus needed to be transmitted from one person to another to cause infection.

The finding that the corona virus can be transmitted through talking to each other can strengthen cases for wearing PPE such as masks and taking other precautions in the environment to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Learning:

The researchers used an intense laser beam to visualize the bursts of speech droplets produced during repeated spoken phrases. They then obtained quantitative estimates for the number and size of speech droplets that remain on the air. The participants were asked to speak in the open end of a cardboard box and the researchers illuminated the inside with a green laser and tracked the bursts of droplets the person produced while speaking.

These findings reveal the following:

  • Laser scanning records about 2,600 tiny droplets per second while someone is talking
  • Speaking louder can produce greater droplets as well as this larger number of droplets
  • Just one minute of loud talking can produce at least 1,000 speech drops that contain a virus
  • These drops shrink after dehydration as soon as they leave someone’s mouth, but they float in the air for about eight to 14 minutes.

Researchers do not yet understand whether all the speech, sneezing, and cough drops that carry pathogens are equally contagious or if a certain amount of a deadly novel coronavirus needs to be transmitted so that someone becomes ill with it.

Based on this and other evidence, it would be wise to avoid face-to-face conversations with other people unless you are far apart and in a well-ventilated room, including outdoors, “Linsey Marr, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Virginia Tech told the New York Times.

Under what the government calls ‘the quarantine of daily life’, South Koreans are still encouraged to wear masks Photo: AFP / Ed JONES

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