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The current and former Cook Islands PM face charges of fraud | Instant News


World

Henry Puna, Cook Islands Member of Parliament in 2017.Photo / Duncan Brown

By RNZ

Cook Islands Prime Minister Mark Brown and former prime minister and lawmaker Henry Puna face charges of fraud and two counts of improper public money payments.

Norman George, prosecution adviser, said Brown and Puna conspired to arrange two charter flights funded by public funds to travel to the northern islands of Penryhn and Pukapuka.

The flight picked up the two winning candidates from the islands and returned them to Rarotonga to form a government after the June 2018 general elections.

The two current winning candidates are Deputy Prime Minister Robert Tapaitau and Deputy Minister of Justice Tingika Elikana.

These flights are paid for from the Civil Registry budget administered by Parliament.

An email from interim Finance Minister Mark Brown to the former Deputy Clerk of Parliament to regulate flights, was issued in court by private prosecutors.

George, who was conveyed, was never mentioned that he would bring another successful candidate to Rarotonga.

This case was tried by the judge and chaired by Chief Justice Sir Hugh Williams QC.

The charges were filed as a result of a personal lawsuit by Rarotonga resident Paul Allsworth alleging about $ 35,000 had been paid for the flight.

Puna and Brown pleaded not guilty to the charges.

The prosecutor has submitted a list of 19 witnesses to be summoned during the trial.

The list includes a number of current Members of Parliament including Deputy Prime Minister and Member of Parliament Penrhyn Robert Tapaitau, Member of Parliament Pukapuka Tingika Elikana, and former Member of Parliament Penrhyn Willie John.

Prime Minister of the Cook Islands Mark Brown.
Prime Minister of the Cook Islands Mark Brown.

Former lawmakers Teariki Heather and Kiriau Turepu are also expected to attend, along with Finance Secretary Garth Henderson and Acting Police Commissioner Akatauira Matapo.

Puna will be represented by attorney Ben Marshall, and attorney Tim Arnold will be represented by Brown.

The Cook Islands News reports that the case was first brought to the High Court in 2019, when private criminal proceedings were filed by attorney Norman George on behalf of the former plaintiff of the case, Teokotai George.

As with the current case, both Puna and Brown have pleaded not guilty, but a few days before the case went to trial, the complainants instructed lawyer Wilkie Rasmussen, who had taken over the case, to withdraw the complaint.

As part of the indictment, both are suspected of having violated article 280 of the 1969 Crime Law and article 64 (2) (d) (1) of the Law on the Ministry of Finance and Economic Management 1995-96.

The case is the latest in a number of trials presided over by Chief Justice Williams this month which began last week and intend to fill deposits after a year-long lull caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.

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Switzerland – Addiction is increasing during the pandemic | Instant News


(MENAFN – Swissinfo) The current Covid pandemic in Switzerland has increased the risk of addiction, according to a new report.

This content is published on 10 February 2021 – 11:09 February 10 2021 – 11:09 swissinfo.ch/ug View in other languages: 1

People who are vulnerable to substance abuse or gambling, as well as those who are under pressure at work or in their families, are especially vulnerable, says a recent survey by the foundation Addiction Switzerland.

Experts find that excessive alcohol consumption is one of the main problems. They added that most smokers also increased their daily count.

The reportExternal link also notes online gambling trends especially among the 18 to 29 year age group.

There are an estimated 250,000 alcoholics in Switzerland. About 19% of the population are regular smokers and more than 3% are addicted to gambling according to the report.

Experts recommend that people who feel unable to cope with their addictive behavior seek outside help.

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GO NZ: Te Araroa changed my life walking across New Zealand | Instant News


Travel

Laura Waters, pictured at Masons Hut, the last shack on the South Island on the Te Araroa Trail. Photo / Laura Waters

My eyes cloud as I think about the time I walked from Cape Reinga to Bluff. Here it is again, my friends must be thinking as I talk about the joys, tribulations, and amazing sights encountered during a 3000 km journey through this country. As far as a once-in-a-lifetime trip, setting foot in Te Araroa has been transformative, and its long-term effects on my life have only made it even more memorable. With the challenges of today’s world, fleeing into the wild is again a tantalizing choice.

Long-distance lines are gaining popularity around the world and in 2011 New Zealand launched its own line, a linear route connecting many pre-existing lines with several new links. In the north it winds from the west coast to the east and back again, via secluded beaches, mossy forest, the volcanic desert of Tongariro National Park, and knife-tipped ridges across the Tararua Mountains. To the south, a more direct route up and along the dramatic Southern Alps is required. About once a week, sometimes more often, the walkway intersects the city where hot showers and general stores offer the opportunity to refresh and recharge.

The Te Araroa Trail takes hikers across the country, from remote beaches in the North, to country tracks in the South.  Photo / Laura Waters
The Te Araroa Trail takes hikers across the country, from remote beaches in the North, to country tracks in the South. Photo / Laura Waters

When I left in 2013, Te Araroa was an unknown quantity, a trail that few people have managed to complete. Even though I had walked a dozen or more days under my belt, none were even more than 65 km so it was an experiment with fire on body and mind. I need it. After the closure of toxic relationships and the stress of city life, my world has been taken over by crippling anxiety and depression, the symptoms miraculously and magically disappearing within weeks of being immersed in the peace and simplicity of nature.

Then I fixed a problem I wasn’t even aware of. Walking the trails, I face countless challenges: steep, open mountains, sudden blizzards, a number of unobstructed river crossings, dubious trail signs, shoulder dislocations and, not least, loss of hiking companions. I got injured on the second day. But in overcoming this challenge I found a hitherto untapped inner intellect and courage. I learned to adapt to the environment, listen to my heart’s content and overcome fear. I found I was able to do more than I realized and I noticed how little you need to be happy – food, shelter, and a bag of belongings is enough. It is clear that life can be fun if you simplify it and eliminate the “noise.” The insights gained during those five months changed my life forever, leading to a career change and a substantial re-establishment of personal beliefs and worldviews.

Upper Travers Hut in Nelson Lakes National Park, one of the DoC huts on the Te Araroa trail.  Photo / Laura Waters
Upper Travers Hut in Nelson Lakes National Park, one of the DoC huts on the Te Araroa trail. Photo / Laura Waters

Taking the entire route will give you an experience like no other, but if you can’t spare the time or energy to wade the 3000 km, consider climbing the section, taking bite-sized stages over a long period of time. Alternatively, choose an interesting part of the cherry. The stretch from St Arnaud to Boyle Village, across from Nelson’s Lake National Park on the South Island, really evokes a few tears from me as I see its beautiful snow-capped mountains, fast-flowing rivers and vast boulder fields.

A solitary prostitute descending towards Lake Tekapo on the Te Araroa Line.  Photo / Laura Waters
A solitary prostitute descending towards Lake Tekapo on the Te Araroa Line. Photo / Laura Waters

If you’re curious to know what it’s like to have the beach all to yourself for four days, the first 100 kilometers south of Cape Reinga follows the secluded golden trail of Ninety Mile Beach. Mount Pirongia, in Waikato, marks the first true mountain range for hikers to the south and a two-day portion of its steep green mossy cliffs. Real delights are lesser-known finds such as the stunning jungle on North Island Hakarimata Road or Telford Tops on the Takitimu Trail to the south. The four-day Mavora Walkway, south of Queenstown, is also renowned for its lakes, mountains, beech forest and amazing sense of isolation.

The highlight of the trail – which incidentally doesn’t involve walking – is the 200 kilometers paddling up the Whanganui River. Kayaks and canoes can be rented at Taumarunui for a six-day paddle out to sea in Whanganui. About 200 rapids are scattered along the route, light enough for beginners to traverse yet foamy enough to get their heart racing. In some places, the river carves its way through steep-sided canyon walls dotted with ferns and gushing waterfalls, and campsites overlooking snaking water are some of the most beautiful places I have ever come across.

The Te Araroa Trail passes through the misty and misty forests of the Tararua Mountains.  Photo / Laura Waters
The Te Araroa Trail passes through the misty and misty forests of the Tararua Mountains. Photo / Laura Waters

Most of the nights on the North Island are spent in tents, but on the South Island, hikers can make use of many DoC huts on their way, especially when the weather turns challenging. Buying an inland cottage entry ticket will give you access to all the huts on the trail and while some have all the sophistication and comfort of a garden shed, others are double-layered masterpieces with cozy wood-burning stoves and five-star views.

I’m not going to cover it with sugar, walk all day, every day, need a little energy. I made it past the 10kg Whittakers in the five months it took me to complete the trail and I’m still losing weight (ah, those were the days). Te Araroa is also not for the faint of heart. The terrain is quite challenging at times and can be exposed to bad weather, but nothing compares to the feeling of being completely connected to the mainland as you peer through your flying tent as the moon rises over the remote Ahuriri River Valley. Or the shadow of a killer whale’s dorsal fin slicing through the surface of Queen Charlotte Sound as you follow the ridge trail above. Or a softer owl chirp in the dark northern forest night. Moments like magic make the trouble worth it.

Laura Waters is the author of Bewildered’s memoir, about her 3,000km hike along New Zealand.

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The Te Araroa Trail stretches 3000km from Cape Reinga to Bluff and takes between 4-6 months to complete. Topographic maps, track records and further information can be downloaded from teararoa.org.nz

For more New Zealand travel ideas and inspiration, visit newzealand.com

This story was first published in the New Zealand Herald Travel on October 1

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The adventures of the Rotorua in New Zealand friends from Cape Reinga to Bluff | Instant News


A group of friends embark on a massive journey which they take from the top to the bottom of Aotearoa. Photo / Provided

A group of friends set out for a bike ride across the country, little did they know that they would complete the trip just days from the current record.

Rotorua doctor Darragh Grace says he has spent the past two and a half years trying to convince friends to complete the 3000km journey with him.

It wasn’t until she moved to Rotorua that she found some friends who wanted to cycle around the country.

Team of eight leaves the summit of Aoteroa on 28 November.  Photo / Provided
Team of eight leaves the summit of Aoteroa on 28 November. Photo / Provided

“I mentioned it to a few people and suddenly it went from me to having eight people to like ‘yes we can do it’.”

The current record is set by endurance athlete Marlborough and cyclist Craig Harper.

Back in 2017, Harper cycled across the country in four days, nine hours and 45 minutes.

Grace is no stranger to long-distance cycling but told the Herald she had completed the trip in a longer time frame.

However, because Grace and many of her team members are Rotorua-based doctors, she aims to complete the trip in less time.

“We’re trying to do it again but in a much shorter time frame so that more people can join in and really do it,” he told the Herald.

“I looked at the map and said it was pretty cool to go from top to bottom New Zealand and wonder how fast we could do it.”

After the team was formed, Grace said the date had been taken – November 28th.

“We picked a date and said look, hell or high tide we will try,” he said.

The team named Mikie Milloy (front) as the 'head entertainer' because she has 'a lot of talent to keep everyone motivated'.  Photo / Provided
The team named Mikie Milloy (front) as the ‘head entertainer’ because she has ‘a lot of talent to keep everyone motivated’. Photo / Provided

After nearly 13 weeks of training, Erin Foley, Sam Hulbert, Lachlan Cooper, Jonty Morreau, Mikie Milloy, Raewyn Cavubati, Elsa Carter, Selena Metherell, and Grace embark on their cross country cycling journey.

Dividing into two teams, riders will cycle relay, two hours of life and two hours of rest, for 18 hours a day covering 180km per team and a total of 360km per day.

The team included riders with varying experience on road bikes, including one rider who only rode a road bicycle 10 weeks prior to the cross-country trip.

Grace described the trip as “busy” but at the same time “extraordinary.”

Starting at the top of Aotearoa, the Rotorua friends left Cape Reinga and reached the town of Ahipara in the far north on their first day, covering a total distance of 140 km.

Sam Hulbert, Lachlan Cooper, Raewyn Cavubati, Elsa Carter, Mikie Milloy and Darragh Grace are the six members of the team.  Photo / Provided
Sam Hulbert, Lachlan Cooper, Raewyn Cavubati, Elsa Carter, Mikie Milloy and Darragh Grace are the six members of the team. Photo / Provided

“It’s incredible. Seeing the changing landscape alone is phenomenal, from going to the dunes and then on the same day you drive to Auckland via Helensville.”

The team planned to spend three full days covering a distance of 380 km, but they encountered some speed constraints.

No alarms, almost missing a ferry and other issues mean the team is cycling more than they expected on any given day.

“Instead of doing 50 km, we ended up doing 80 km with headwinds and rain.”

With an average of 150 km a day, Grace said the trip was “wonderful” mentally and physically.

Low on energy, Grace said the wind was very helpful on their last trip.

“We are finally getting a tow from Queenstown down.”

As soon as the team reaches Bluff, one of the team members kneels and surprises his fellow team members with a proposal.

At the end of the trip, the team was surprised by the engagement of Lachlan Cooper and Raewyn Cavubati.  Photo / Provided
At the end of the trip, the team was surprised by the engagement of Lachlan Cooper and Raewyn Cavubati. Photo / Provided

Team creates Give a little where friends and family can donate with money that goes to local charities Medical personnel to medical personnel and Brothers Rotorua.

Even though the team didn’t break any records, they completed the journey in just a week.

“It’s nice to finish but when you finish you start thinking about your days on the bike and you start missing him.”

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Karachi is having its coldest day in winter at this time | Instant News


KARACHI: With temperatures dropping to 8.3 degrees Celsius, Karachi has recorded its lowest minimum temperature this winter, the Met office said Friday.

Mercury fell to the single digits on Friday morning in Karachi under the influence of a cold wave that swept the country, said Pakistan’s Meteorological Department (PMD). “What is recorded as the minimum temperature in Karachi, however, is the highest temperature when compared to other countries. Mercy in other big cities ranges between two and five degrees Celsius, ”a PMD official told The News. Under the impact of the resulting cold wave, the weather in Karachi will likely remain cold and dry for the next few days with temperatures hovering between seven and nine degrees, the official said. PMD officials said the northern regions of the country were experiencing extremely cold conditions, while Balochistan and Punjab’s Sindh plains were also under the grip of a cold wave. The official said that under these conditions, temperatures in Karachi will most likely remain cool and dry until at least Thursday. He said the minimum temperature in Pakistan was minus 12 degrees Celsius recorded in Astore while Islamabad’s minimum temperature was minus two, Lahore temperature two, Quetta minus five, Peshawar one, Gilgit minus seven, Murree minus seven, Faisalabad two and Multan three degrees Celsius.

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