Tag Archives: Democratic

The Democratic Panel swept the KUJ Dastoor poll | Instant News



Rashid Aziz and Moosa Kaleem were elected president and general secretary of the Karachi Union of Journalists (KUJ) Dastoor respectively for the years 2021-22 following elections held at the Karachi Press Club. According to the results announced by the electoral committee, the KUJ Democratic Panel pocketed all the seats.

Aslam Khan and Wakeelur Rehman were elected vice presidents, while Syed Nabeel Akhtar and Adil Zafar Khan have been declared successful unopposed as joint secretaries. Mohammad Bilal Tahir was elected as treasurer, while Hammad Hussain was elected as secretary of information.

Nine members of the governing body – Asim Bhatti, Abdul Qadir Mangrio, Jamal Khurshid, Atif Khan, Fehmida Yousfi, Syed Fareed Alam, Mansoor Ahmed Khan, Mohsin Ahmed and Khalid Khan – were elected to the executive board. Polls in the press club have seen 366 voters cast their votes.

Minister of Information Sindh Syed Nasir Hussain Shah, Minister of Education Saeed Ghani, Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf Karachi President Khurrum Sher Zaman and Pakistan

Muslim League-Functional MPA Nusrat Sehar Abbasi

congratulate the newly elected KUJ Dastoor agency and ensure their cooperation in solving journalist problems.

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Impeachment trial: The US Senate votes to release Donald Trump | Instant News


The US Senate has voted to acquit former president Donald Trump on charges of inciting a revolt last month on the Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that exposed the fragility of America’s democratic tradition and left a divided country to accept the violence instigated by its defeated presidency.

The vote was 57-43, less than the 67 votes needed to get the sentence. Seven Republicans split from their party to find Trump guilty: Richard Burr from North Carolina, Bill Cassidy from Louisiana, Susan Collins from Maine, Lisa Murkowski from Alaska, Mitt Romney from Utah, Ben Sasse from Nebraska and Patrick Toomey from Pennsylvania. It was the shortest impeachment trial in US history, lasting only five days.

Trump welcomed his release in a lengthy statement praising the Senate ruling. “This is another phase of the greatest witch hunt in our country’s history. No president has experienced anything like it,” the statement read. Trump thanked lawyers and defenders in Congress, who he said “stood proudly for a Constitution that we all respect and for the principles of holy law at the heart of our country”. Then he spoke directly to his supporters: “Our historic, patriotic and beautiful movement to Make America Great Again has just begun.”

After voting to release Trump for inciting the rebellion, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell condemned the former president and called him “practically and morally responsible” for the unrest. He said he could not choose to punish because Trump was “constitutionally ineligible for punishment” because he was no longer president. “President Trump is still in charge of everything he did during his time in office,” McConnell said. “He hasn’t gotten away with anything.”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi scoffed at the “cowardly” Republican Party who voted for release. With the impeachment trial now over, some lawmakers have suggested condemnation as an option. Pelosi dismissed the effort as a very inadequate attempt to deal with violent attacks in the seat of state power. “What we see in the Senate today is a bunch of cowardly Republicans who seem to have no choice because they are afraid,” he said. “We condemn people for using stationery for the wrong purpose. We don’t condemn people for inciting a revolt that kills people in the Capitol.”

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said January 6 would live on as a “day of blasphemy” in American history. Schumer took to the Senate floor to denounce the former president’s Senate release, calling the day of the uprising Trump’s “last terrible legacy” and saying the stains from his actions would never be “wiped out”.

Republicans are eager to finish the trial and move away from discussions about Trump and the uprising in the Capitol. Democrats, too, have a motive to move because the Senate cannot continue President Joe Biden’s new agenda including Covid-19 assistance while the impeachment trail is unfolding.

In closing arguments, Democrats again charge that Trump was responsible for the deadly January 6 siege on the day the Senate ratified the election results. “He abused his office by siding with the rebels at almost every point, rather than with the United States Congress, rather than with the Constitution,” said House impeachment manager Jamie Raskin.

Raskin has previously said witnesses were needed to determine Trump’s role in inciting the unrest. Fifty-five senators voted for motions to consider witnesses, including Susan Collins from Maine, Lisa Murkowski from Alaska, Ben Sasse from Nebraska and Mitt Romney from Utah. Once they did, Lindsey Graham from South Carolina changed her voice to join them at 55-45.

Trump’s lawyers opposed witness calls, with attorney Michael van der Veen saying it would open the door for him to call around 100 witnesses. He said depositions could take place at his law office in Philadelphia, sparking laughter from senators.

“If you choose witnesses,” Van der Veen said, crossing his arms and then lifting them into the air to emphasize, “don’t handcuff me to the number of witnesses I can have.”

The outcome of this raw and emotional process reflects a country divided by a former president and his brand-name political future. The ruling could affect not only Trump’s political future but also senators vowing to provide impartial justice on a jury.

“If we don’t regulate this right and call it what it is, the ultimate constitutional crime by the president of the United States, the past will not pass,” another impeachment manager, Madeleine Dean of Pennsylvania, told senators. “The past will be our future.”

The nearly week-long trial has delivered a bleak and vivid narrative of the riots and their consequences in ways in which senators, most of whom fled for their own safety that day, admitted they were still coping.

Prosecutors argue that Trump’s call to go to the Capitol and “fight with all his might” for his presidency is part of a pattern of orchestrated violent rhetoric and false claims that fueled the masses. Five people were killed, including a rioter who was shot and a police officer.

Trump’s lawyers retaliated within three short hours on Friday that Trump’s words were not intended to incite violence and that impeachment was simply a “witch hunt” designed to prevent him from serving in office again.

Just by watching a graphic video – rioters screaming at the Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Vice President Mike Pence, who is leading the vote count – senators say they are starting to understand how dangerous it is to shut down the country to chaos.

Hundreds of rioters stormed the building, taking over the Senate. Some were involved in bloody direct battles with police

Trump’s lawyers have vehemently denied that the former president instigated unrest and they played out-of-context video clips showing Democrats, some of them senators who are now on juries, also telling supporters to “go to war,” aimed at paralleling Trump. that’s too hot. rhetoric.

“This is ordinary political rhetoric,” said van der Veen. “Countless politicians have talked about fighting for our principles.” Democrat senators shook their heads at what many would call a false equation with their own fiery words.

Trump is the only two-impeached president and the first to face trial charges after leaving office.

Unlike Trump’s impeachment trial on Ukraine affairs, the complex allegations of corruption and obstruction of his efforts to get the foreign ally to dig up dirt about his campaign rival Biden, this one carries an emotional blow to the US’s unexpected vulnerability. peaceful electoral traditions.

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New Zealand again sits at the top of the list of the world’s most democratic countries | Instant News


The Economist’s annual Democracy Index has placed New Zealand fourth out of 165 independent countries and territories. Photo / Mark Mitchell

New Zealand was once again in the top five list in the international ranking of the world’s most democratic countries, but failed to improve last year’s position.

The Economist’s annual Democracy Index has placed New Zealand fourth out of 165 independent countries and territories, giving it an almost perfect score of 9.25 / 10.

But, for the first time in a decade, New Zealand’s score has slumped – albeit only slightly.

Between 2010-2019, New Zealand scored a consistent figure of 9.26 each year. But 2020’s 0.01 percent drop has no impact on New Zealand’s overall ranking on the list.

Scandinavian countries dominate the top ten, with Norway at the top, followed by Iceland and Sweden.

Australia is ninth, with a score of 8.96 and Iran is the least democratic country on the list, with a score of only 2.2.

New Zealand’s ranking places it in the “full democracy” category on the list – in contrast, a US score of 7.92 places it in the “flawed democracy” category.

The report noted that New Zealand and Australia have always enjoyed “full democracy” status – “although their scores have dropped slightly over the year”.

He also noted the fact that New Zealand had a “peaceful democracy” last year – a year the report described as “chaos”.

But apart from this brief reference, this 75-page report provides few details on New Zealand.

This gives the country a perfect score of 10 in terms of electoral process and its pluralism, but 8.93 when it comes to scores of a functioning Government.

However, this figure is still higher than most of the other countries on the list.
The main focus of the report is on a tumultuous year in the US.

Although the overall score did not change dramatically, the report said the overall score appeared stable and the US position was “deceptive”.

The US political engagement score rose but its overall performance was held back by a number of weaknesses.

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These include a very low level of trust in political institutions and parties; severe dysfunction in government functions and increasing threats to freedom of expression.

“What is more worrying is that public confidence in the democratic process will be further hit in 2020 by the refusal of the outgoing president to accept the election results,” the report said.

“Trump and his allies continue to accuse voter fraud long after the elections are over, without producing plausible evidence to support their claims and in the face of court rulings against them.”

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The PDM struggle aims to uphold democratic values, said Aftb Sherpao | Instant News


PESHAWAR: Chairman of the Qaumi Watan Party (QWP) Aftab Ahmad Khan Sherpao on Saturday said Pakistani ruler Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) made accusations against opposition party leaders to save their government.

Speaking at a meeting here, the head of QWP said the Pakistan Democratic Movement strives to uphold the rule of law and democratic values, adding that the PTI rulers came to power through a false mandate and they were elected.

On this occasion, the descendant of Sadat’s family, Syed Fayyaz Ali Shah, announced that he had joined QWP along with his family members and supporters.

Asking a question, Aftab Sherpao said that if the prime minister was elected then why would he rely on the powers that be.

He said that after causing massive damage to the country, Prime Minister Imran Khan is now saying that political parties should not form a government without preparation.

The QWP leader argued that the prime minister’s resignation request was legitimate, as he had admitted his failure to deliver.

He said it was ironic that the prime minister had admitted his government was not ready to deliver, but he blamed past rulers for its incompetence.

“The country has experienced a crisis of sugar, flour and gasoline because of this government’s incompetence,” he said, calling for an investigation into the LNG failure, which caused huge losses to the country.

Aftab Sherpao says unemployment and inflation have made their lives miserable. “Instead of creating 10 million jobs, the government has made many people out of work because of flawed policies and incompetence,” he said.

He added that the accountability process must be continued, but it must be transparent and no one can become a victim.

Criticizing the PTI government, Aftab Sherpao said the Bus Rapid Transit project could not be completed within the allotted time and thus costs had also increased, but no one was held accountable. He also accused of irregularities in the Billion Tree Tsunami project.

He emphasized that the PTI foreign funding case could not be decided within five years, which raised many questions about PTI’s financial affairs. “Imran Khan is talking about the State of Medina, therefore the responsibility of the ruler must be held first,” he demanded.

He said work on a project linked to the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor had slowed down. The government conspired against the 18th Amendment and the National Finance Commission award, he said.

The QWP leader said PTI ministers used profanity against opposition party leaders. He said the PTI rulers could not respect a single oath made with the people and took turns for all matters.

He also demanded a judicial investigation into the deaths of seven patients at the Khyber Teaching Hospital due to lack of oxygen.

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The PDM struggle aims to uphold democratic values, claims Sherpao | Instant News


PESHAWAR: Chairman of the Qaumi Watan Party (QWP) Aftab Ahmad Khan Sherpao on Saturday said Pakistani ruler Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) made accusations against opposition party leaders to save their government.

Speaking at a meeting here, the head of QWP said the Pakistan Democratic Movement strives to uphold the rule of law and democratic values, adding that the PTI rulers came to power through a false mandate and they were elected.

On this occasion, the descendant of Sadat’s family, Syed Fayyaz Ali Shah, announced that he had joined QWP along with his family members and supporters.

Asking a question, Aftab Sherpao said that if the prime minister was elected then why would he rely on the powers that be.

He said that after causing massive damage to the country, Prime Minister Imran Khan is now saying that political parties should not form a government without preparation.

The QWP leader argued that the prime minister’s resignation request was legitimate, as he had admitted his failure to deliver.

He said it was ironic that the prime minister had admitted his government was not ready to deliver, but he blamed past rulers for its incompetence.

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