Tag Archives: disabilities

The ‘one-handed sewing man’ in New Jersey turned Erb’s Palsy’s flaw into superhuman abilities | Instant News


TRENTON, New Jersey – Qaysean Williams, the rising fashion designer of New Jersey, has overcome his disability challenges by turning him into superhuman abilities.

From a very young age, Qaysean, who suffered a nerve injury at birth, permanently paralyzing his left arm, knew he was different.

“Being around other people, especially kids, that’s when I really started to realize that I was different. They started teasing me and making fun of me and it was probably because they had never seen anyone like me before,” said Qaysean Williams. , fashion designer and founder ManikinMob, LLC.

Although Qaysean endured bullying during his childhood and adolescence, through fashion he rediscovered the self-love he had been looking for for years.

Related: A century-old Hoboken Antique Bar and Bakery is keeping the fire burning amid the pandemic

Over the years, Qaysean has established himself for his intricate designs and his ability to cut and sew dresses, tuxedos and all kinds of accessories using just one hand.

“My fashion aesthetic is what I call: ‘Streetwear Fantasy’ because I come from urban urban communities, I know about streetwear. So in my clothes whenever I get creative, I always keep the streetwear aspect in mind of something you can literally tire on the road , but with glamor and fantasy, “says Qaysean.

As Qaysean continues to establish himself in the world of fashion, he showcases his work designing clothes for entertainers and displays them at exhibitions and even New York Fashion Week.

By changing her mindset and embracing her unique talents, Qaysean has proven that her disabilities will not stop her from conquering her goal of one day collaborating with a household fashion designer.

“If you have something that makes you stand out, it means you are very special. God loves you more. So hey, just love yourself,” said Qaysean.

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Contact Community Journalist Miguel Amaya
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The ‘one-handed sewing man’ in New Jersey turned Erb’s Palsy’s flaw into superhuman abilities | Instant News


TRENTON, New Jersey – Qaysean Williams, the rising fashion designer of New Jersey, has overcome his disability challenges by turning him into superhuman abilities.

From a very young age, Qaysean, who suffered a nerve injury at birth, permanently paralyzing his left arm, knew he was different.

“Being around other people, especially kids, that’s when I really started to realize that I was different. They started teasing me and making fun of me and it was probably because they had never seen anyone like me before,” said Qaysean Williams. , fashion designer and founder ManikinMob, LLC.

Although Qaysean endured bullying during his childhood and adolescence, through fashion he rediscovered the self-love he had been looking for for years.

Related: A century-old Hoboken Antique Bar and Bakery is keeping the fire burning amid the pandemic

Over the years, Qaysean has established himself for his intricate designs and his ability to cut and sew dresses, tuxedos and all kinds of accessories using just one hand.

“My fashion aesthetic is what I call: ‘Streetwear Fantasy’ because I come from urban urban communities, I know about streetwear. So in my clothes whenever I get creative, I always keep the streetwear aspect in mind of something you can literally tire on the road , but with glamor and fantasy, “says Qaysean.

As Qaysean continues to establish himself in the world of fashion, he showcases his work designing clothes for entertainers and displays them at exhibitions and even New York Fashion Week.

By changing her mindset and embracing her unique talents, Qaysean has proven that her disabilities will not stop her from conquering her goal of one day collaborating with a household fashion designer.

“If you have something that makes you stand out, it means you are very special. God loves you more. So hey, just love yourself,” said Qaysean.

———-

Contact Community Journalist Miguel Amaya
Send a tip to Miguel
Follow Miguel on Facebook
Follow @ Miguelabc7NY on Twitter
Follow @ Miguelabc7NY on Instagram

.



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The fashion industry joins the non-profit organization Avenue to help people with disabilities find jobs | Instant News


Stephanie Trinh-Tran faces more obstacles in pursuing her dream of working in the fashion industry.

The 21-year-old woman, who lives with autism, was knocked out of fashion classes until she came to the non-profit organization Avenue, where she worked on an order fulfillment team for a clothing label.

“I love the clothes, the prints, the styles and the colors,” he said.

Stephanie’s mother, Julie, thought her daughter might never get into this industry.

The teacher is reluctant to accept because of the support she needs to understand the assignment, but Julie is confident in her daughter’s abilities.

Stephanie Trinh-Tran just wanted a chance, after she was knocked out of fashion and work experience courses.(

ABC News: Brendan Esposito

)

“Whenever he had free time he would sit and draw and I would look at him and think, ‘I need to help him [get work in the industry]’,” she says.

Finally Stephanie completed a year-long TAFE course and while looking for work experience, her mother found Avenue and its partner, the fashion company Yevu.

Avenue was started by Sydney woman Laura O’Reilly and her family following the experiences of her late brother Shane, who was living with cerebral palsy and “needed support with all aspects of her daily life”.

“He thought he was leaving school and, like his brothers, going out and working.”

Laura O'Reilly looks off into the distance at the clothing samples in the background of the shelf.
Avenue CEO Laura O’Reilly founded a nonprofit organization because her sister missed an opportunity.(

ABC News: Brendan Esposito

)

Her family was surprised to find very few job options for Shane when she finished her education, so they designed their own.

Avenue now has four co-working spaces across Sydney where people with disabilities can choose the work they do – and get paid to do it.

“Avenue serves … groups that are inaccessible to public works – groups that traditional societies say they can’t work at all,” O’Reilly said.

Avenue receives funds through the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) package from participants.

Each participant selects a team to work with according to their skills and interests, including taking care of pets, mailboxes for real estate agents, or distribution orders for Yevu.

Avenue provided the needed on-site support for the more than 300 people in its books.

“They work on their team and then whatever income that team gets they save and save,” says O’Reilly.

Social enterprises working together

A social enterprise, Yevu’s clothes are made in Ghana by local women and distributed by the Avenue team, which includes Stephanie and 34 other people with disabilities.

Yevu founder, Australian woman Anna Robertson said the brand provides “sustainable, dignified and fair” jobs for women in Ghana and the partnership with Avenue is a perfect fit.

Anna Roberston is standing next to the mannequin, with a sample of clothing on the back.
Yevu founder Anna Robertson said the partnership made sense because it fit with her business ethics.(

ABC News: Brendan Esposito

)

“Avenue provides job opportunities for everyone, they don’t discriminate,” said Robertson.

He said the partnership also made good business sense.

“I love seeing the team here, they all work really hard to provide great customer service and they know the product very well.”

‘I feel part of something’

Sophie Grivas, who lives with Down syndrome, has found a sense of happiness since joining the Avenue team.

Sophie Grivas and Amrita Ramjas and Stephanie Trinh-Tran laughed and reached out while holding fashion products.
Sophie, Amrita, and Stephanie retained whatever pay they got from the fashion company.(

ABC News: Brendan Esposito

)

The 34-year-old hopes to move on on his own and says the role makes him more confident.

“I love being around my friends, including my best friends and building computer skills,” says Grivas.

“I learned about budgeting, saving and going shopping.”

Her colleague Amrita Ramjas, 32, who lives with Down syndrome and an intellectual disability, agrees.

“I really like the team because I feel included,” said Ramjas. “I feel part of something.”

Stephanie Trinh-Tran leaned back on the table that had folded clothes with scraps of paper on top.
Stephanie Trinh-Tran hopes the opportunities she has at Yevu will generate more opportunities to advance her career.(

ABC News: Brendan Esposito

)

Recently appointed as a member of the team this month for her hard work, Stephanie said she hopes the skills she has learned will lead to further employment in the fashion industry.

“Online or in industry,” he said. “I love clothes … they are very beautiful and I like to draw ideas and create things.”

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Public restroom experts develop a blueprint for how Australia can improve toilet management | Instant News


Australia’s 19,000 public toilets are built and managed by councils, private property owners and developers, but one toilet specialist believes they should be managed by a single government agency.

Social planning researcher Katherine Webber last week spent time in Canberra telling federal policymakers how state public toilets could – and should – be better.

The Churchill Fellowship recipient says her 2018 grant allows her to embark on a global tour to study how other countries are managing public toilets.

From this Ms Webber develops a proposed set of guiding principles for the design and functioning of public toilets in Australia.

“Everyone out there is a toilet enthusiast; everyone has a public toilet story they want or don’t want to share,” he told ABC Radio Brisbane.

His trip took him to Berlin, where a city-wide audit resulted in a public-private partnership to add more automatic toilets, overcoming gaps in the toilet network.

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In the US city of Portland, public toilets have been transformed from gender-specific kiosks to all-user kiosks with signs indicating what’s available – toilets or urinal – in plans that focus on accessibility and inclusion.

Meanwhile, Singapore’s Happy Toilet program allows people to rate and review it on cleanliness, design, maintenance and “user satisfaction”.

“Toilets are a crossroads, yes, they are important to individual health, but they support access and inclusion,” says Ms Webber.

“They too support economic development and tourism. It does not fit into one area of ​​government. “

Katherine Webber has researched the design and management of public toilets around the world.(

Provided: Churchill Trust

)

Better supervision is needed

Me Webber said the final report included a list of key stakeholders who could influence the design and management of public toilets, including the Australian Local Government Association and Australian Infrastructure.

He said public toilets were generally built on a site-by-site basis rather than a planned network taking into account accessibility, travel and other issues, which, he said, needed to change.

Toilet maintenance and access were brought to the fore last year during the pandemic, when some councils that did not install soap dispensers due to vandalism or environmental concerns quickly reversed course.

Signs often appear on toilets urging people to wash their hands for 20 seconds using soap – without soap.

Anecdotal reports of public toilets being closed to reduce transmission of the virus sparked frustration from people with accessibility needs and concerns over access for vulnerable people.

And during the height of the pandemic, several councils in Sydney reported on the problem of stealing toilet paper and soap, with officials in Willough warning they would close some facilities if such behavior continued.

Supermarket with big empty shelves.
Supermarkets are often left without toilet paper or paper towels due to panic buying due to the coronavirus.(

ABC News: Freya Michie

)

In England, a map “lockdown loo” pointed out frustrated residents about public toilets staying open, an issue that is fast becoming a public health problem, says Webber.

The City of Sydney’s 2014 public toilet strategy aims to have facilities “within 400 meters of any point in the center of Sydney”, while last year the City of South Perth launched a 15-year public toilet strategy.

He noted “there are no legislative requirements for local governments to provide public toilets” but there is “societal hope and a historical basis” for doing so.

Brisbane Greens councilor Jonathan Sri said publicly accessible toilets were often locked after business hours, and city councils were too dependent on private development to fill gaps in the network.

“Many residents don’t care whether the toilets are locked from 10pm to 4pm because it doesn’t affect them directly, but it has a big impact on the lives of some of the most vulnerable members of our community,” said Cr Sri.

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Planning a better toilet

Different planning codes govern the installation of public toilets in various environments, such as on public transport networks or private shopping mall developments.

Ms Webber’s proposed principles include:

  • public health and hygiene
  • the need for security and privacy
  • inclusion
  • ease of maintenance
  • continuity
  • clear communication around availability

He said various features can be added to public toilets to increase comfort and convenience.

“Hooks behind the door for luggage, shelves if necessary use drugs in the toilet.

“There are also some places that have a baby seat in the corner so you don’t have to leave the child in the stroller or carry it or take it to the toilet.

“There are all the extras that could be added if we had better design guidelines for our toilets.”

Accessibility and inclusion

A federally funded National Public Toilet Map, administered by the Continence Foundation of Australia, provides details such as opening hours and facilities for 19,000 public toilets.

Persons with disabilities who need access to public toilets can also purchase a locksmith’s access key which will open public facilities with the same lock cylinder.

Public restrooms, with trash cans and toilet paper dispensers, with toilet paper hanging over them.
Public restrooms in Queensland’s Girraween National Park.(

ABC News: Andree Withey

)

Another initiative, Changing Places, also provides 169 public toilets and facilities for people with higher needs, offering specialized support such as track hoists and large changing tables.

Geoff Trappett, diversity and inclusion consultant and former Paralympian, says planners and developers need to see guidelines for building public toilets as minimal.

“We need to start talking about what you do, even if it’s being informed by the public and seen as an investment rather than a cost,” he said.

“Your customers in the corporate world and citizens in the local government world will thank you for the investment.”

Mr Trappett said the ideal toilet facilities include options for people with limited mobility, people in wheelchairs who are independent, and people in wheelchairs with caregivers.

“The perfect solution is to have all of those options, the range of options available to people, and not try and do one size fits all, because one size fits all is ultimately not the best fit.”

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Blind and myopic Australians cannot access the Covid vaccine search website | Australian News | Instant News


Blind and myopic Australians are banned from the Covid-19 vaccination process because the government’s eligibility check sites and clinic finders fail to meet basic web accessibility standards, according to Australia’s largest low vision service provider.

Vision Australia has slammed the federal government for failing, saying it was “extremely frustrating” given the time it takes to roll out the vaccine.

Last week, the government launched a website that checks a person’s eligibility for a vaccine and connects them with the nearest general practitioner clinic participating in the launch.

But most sites are not compatible with accessibility software such as screen readers, according to Vision Australia, which means they fail to comply with national and international benchmarks for web content accessibility, the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. [WCAG].

The site also uses poor color contrast and excessive alt text.

Vision Australia’s government relations and advocacy manager, Chris Edwards, said blind and myopic Australians cannot determine where and when to get their vaccinations unless they have someone else to support them.

“Myself, I use a screen reader, a screen reader delivers the information that appears on the computer, and I can’t complete the process to really understand where I can get the vaccinations,” Edwards told the Guardian.

“I’m really frustrated that I have to rely on other people to give me basic information that everyone can easily access.”

Vision Australia’s chief executive, Ron Hooton, said the government’s first priority should be making sure the platform is accessible to all Australians.

“People who are blind or have low vision or live with other disabilities have been the hardest hit during the Covid-19 pandemic and not being able to access information about how and when they might receive the vaccine is a further blow,” he said.

Department Health said that vaccine clinic finder is based on an existing web service, HealthDirect service finder. A spokesperson said existing service seekers were audited in 2018 and found to meet accessibility standards.

“Healthdirect ran additional WCAG compliance tests on the Feasibility Checker before launching on March 16th. Testing confirms that the Feasibility Checker is WCAG compliant, ”he said. “The audit identified three links to further information on the site which needed to be improved for full compliance on the website. This link is being updated to address this issue. “

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