Tag Archives: economy and policy

Why Brazil’s Stock Market Struggles because Other Emerging Markets Rebound | Instant News


Brazil’s Chief of General Staff Walter Souza Braga Netto and Minister of Economy Paulo Guedes participated in the New Legal Framework for Basic Sanitation ceremony on July 15, 2020.

Pictures of Andressa Anholete / Getty

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Boeing Wants to Calm Your Fear About Air Travel in the Covid-19 World | Instant News


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Photo by Andrew Vaballero-Reynolds / AFP via Getty Images

Boeing
launching the Confident Traveler Initiative to build consumer confidence about boarding a plane. That means, in part, the flying public will learn a lot about a topic they never knew about they cared about: air circulation in the aircraft cabin.
Boeing (ticker: BA) last week was named Mike Delaney, vice president of digital transformation at Boeing Commercial Airplanes, to lead the initiative. His work: To “minimize the health risks of air travel” in the Covid-19 world.
This is a big job. Airlines, airport operators and aviation regulators seek to set standards for the commercial air travel industry. Issues such as how and where to filter passenger temperatures – as well as what chemicals are acceptable for cleaning aircraft interiors – are all ready for debate.
The thief’s consensus among stakeholders feels scary. Part of Delaney’s work will be difficult. But he will also be tasked with educating the flying public about the technology that is part of every Boeing jet. Part of the job might be a little easier.

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All modern airplanes, for example, are equipped with high efficiency particulate air filters, or HEPA, which are 99.9% effective in removing particles, including viruses. And a lot of outside air passes through the filter, Jim Haas, Boeing’s commercial product development director, explained to Barron.

Haas is confident in cabin air quality. He has three points. First, the air entering the cabin is clean, from outside the jet and filtered. Second, the air flows vertically from the trash can to the floor. Air does not move from front to back – which, he said, limits the spread of airborne particles around the cabin. Third, the air inside the cabin is completely new, exchanged with the outside air, every two to three minutes.
Of course, he understands and advocates for better health measures. Masks, more hand washing, and more sanitation between flights will be a necessity for air travel in the future. What’s more, passengers might come equipped with their own disinfecting wipes to scrub the trays, seat belts, and armrests.
How quickly people will return to the plane is still a hot debate. Wall Street has not seen traffic return to the 2019 level for years. Industry insiders also predict a long road to recovery. Vertical Research Partners analyst Rob Stallard noted in a research report Thursday the International Air Transport Association, or IATA, predicting international travel would not reach levels 2019 until 2023 or 2024.
Nobody, it seems, expects quick recovery on the way. IATA head Alexandre de Juniac noted in a recent media briefing that many countries still have a two-week quarantine mandate for anyone entering from abroad. Fourteen days in a hotel room will destroy the desire for an international vacation. A more travel-friendly system needs to be worked on.
No one knows what the recovery will be like. And there are still many questions. But expanded health measures and consumer education can only help.
All the uncertainties – and the locking of Covid-19, and the remaining concerns about the safety of its 737 MAX jets – have hit Boeing stock. Stocks are down about 64% this year, far behind
Dow Jones Industrial Average
and
S&P 500.

Write to Al Root at [email protected]

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Europe has plans to restart air travel. You May Not Like It. | Instant News


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Photo by Arturo Rey

The European Commission recently published a guide on “how to proceed safely.” If the proposal is widely adopted, the journey will become more complicated compared to the past. And that might become more expensive too.
For starters, the commission believes travel restrictions must be lifted slowly on behalf of public health. Sounds wise.

It also recommends “measures to limit contact” between workers and passengers, as well as passenger-to-passenger contact. That includes the use of personal protective equipment, such as masks and barriers, reduction of tables in public areas, more cleaning, and procedures for boarding a return flight.
The commission also advocates “reducing, if possible, passenger density” as well. That means fewer people on planes and trains.

Europe as a whole has been hit, roughly, as hard as the US by the Covid-19 pandemic. European countries count about 1.3 million cases of corona virus and more than 154,000 deaths. The US reports more than 1.4 million cases and nearly 88,000 deaths.
This document offers a glimpse into the future of air travel. There will be fewer people at the airport. They will wear masks. Some changes, such as temperature checks and health surveys, can be similar to how travel changed after 9/11, when the Transportation Safety Administration was made in the US.
However, overall, the travel experience may not be longer or more difficult. Europe also advocates for expanding the use of technology to streamline entry and ascending procedures.
Another reality for future travelers might be the use of “voluntary” contact tracking applications. Contact tracing is designed to limit outbreaks by making it possible to alert people who have been in contact with an infected person.
The less tourist “density” can mean higher prices, with fewer people covering the majority of costs. But the main impact on plane tickets, buses, subways and trains is not yet known. Many proposed changes sound inflation, but there are also offsets.
Safer predictions: In the absence of a vaccine, the travel sector will be smaller than in the past. That realization, together with the acute effects of the virus, has hit the aviation, aerospace and tourism industries.
A lot of pain has been felt by travel investors in 2020. The stock of Aerospace’s track supplier Barron has fallen by around 50% this year. Incoming stock
Boeing
(ticker: BA), a company that is above the aerospace value chain, is down more than 60% so far in 2020. The average stock of Boeing aviation customers is down about 65% this year, on average.
Cruise operator shares fell by around 75%, hotel stock fell by around 40% from casino prices. All drops are far worse than comparable waterfalls
Dow Jones Industrial Average
and
S&P 500.

Write to Al Root at [email protected]

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