Tag Archives: electricity

PM Imran directs no additional burden on home loan borrowers – Pakistan | Instant News


Published in November 26, 2020 18:56

PM Imran directs that there is no additional burden on home loan borrowers

ISLAMABAD (Dunya News) – Prime Minister Imran Khan has directed that no additional burden should be placed on those who intend to secure easy installment loans for the construction of their homes under the Pakistan Naya Housing Scheme.

He chairs the weekly meeting of the National Coordinating Committee for Housing, Construction and Development in Islamabad on Thursday.

Imran Khan has directed to simplify the NOC procedure and approval process for the supply of new electrical connections.

The Prime Minister said currently, there was no shortage of electricity in the country and therefore, there was no reason to delay the provision of new connections.

He said the government aims to provide shelter for the community, therefore simple facilities and procedures must be ensured.

The Prime Minister explained that because the current procedure created difficulties for the construction sector, the lengthy approval process for utility connections had to be simplified.

Describing a meeting on the Pakistan Quarters housing project, which is underway, in Karachi, the Secretary for Housing and Works said 600 apartments will be built under the project.

On this occasion, the Prime Minister was directed to provide facilities to Pakistani citizens abroad, who intend to invest in Pakistan.

From the meeting it was informed that an online mechanism was being formulated for the NOCs needed to obtain new gas connections.

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PM Imran directs no additional burden on home loan borrowers – Pakistan | Instant News


Published in November 26, 2020 18:56

PM Imran directs that there is no additional burden on home loan borrowers

ISLAMABAD (Dunya News) – Prime Minister Imran Khan has directed that no additional burden should be placed on those who intend to secure easy installment loans for the construction of their homes under the Pakistan Naya Housing Scheme.

He chairs the weekly meeting of the National Coordinating Committee for Housing, Construction and Development in Islamabad on Thursday.

Imran Khan has directed to simplify the NOC procedure and approval process for the supply of new electrical connections.

The Prime Minister said currently, there was no shortage of electricity in the country and therefore, there was no reason to delay the provision of new connections.

He said the government aims to provide shelter for the community, therefore simple facilities and procedures must be ensured.

The Prime Minister explained that because the current procedure created difficulties for the construction sector, the lengthy approval process for utility connections had to be simplified.

Describing a meeting on the Pakistan Quarters housing project, which is underway, in Karachi, the Secretary for Housing and Works said 600 apartments will be built under the project.

On this occasion, the Prime Minister was directed to provide facilities to Pakistani citizens abroad, who intend to invest in Pakistan.

From the meeting it was informed that an online mechanism was being formulated for the NOCs needed to obtain new gas connections.

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Australia’s $ 16 Billion Solar Power Project Will Be The Largest In The World | Instant News


The world’s most ambitious renewable energy project to date is proposed Australia – ASEAN Power Relations. The project will combine the world’s largest solar power plant, largest battery and the longest underwater power cable. The 10 gigawatt (GW) solar farm will cover 30,000 acres in Australia’s sunny Northern Territory. That’s the equivalent of 9 million rooftop photovoltaic (PV) solar panels. The solar power plant will be paired with a 30 gigawatt-hour (GWh) battery storage facility to enable round-the-clock delivery of renewable energy. It’s not enough to build a solar power plant in the middle of nowhere if you can’t turn off the electricity. The project currently envisions an 800 kilometer high-voltage power line to deliver 3 GW of Darwin on the northern coast of Australia’s Northern Territory. From there, it will transfer to a 3,700 km 2.2 GW underwater power line to Singapore. Sun Cable, a Singapore-based company founded in 2018, is behind the proposed $ 16 billion project.

As an illustration, this undersea line will be five times longer than the longest in the world so far – the 720 km Norwegian-to-UK North Sea Link scheduled to come online in 2021. Storage facilities will be 155 times larger than 193 , 5 megawatts Australian. -hours (MWh) Hornsdale Power Reserve, currently the largest operational lithium-ion battery in the world. And it will also be 100 times larger than the largest utility-scale battery in the world, the 300 MWh sodium-sulfur battery at Japan’s Buzen Substation.

The Australia-ASEAN project is scheduled to start operating in late 2027. The project developers expect it to create up to 1,500 jobs during the construction phase, and up to 350 jobs during operation. Given the interest in this type of project, it is important to understand the challenges and final costs of transporting renewable energy over long distances. The ability to do this economically has important consequences from the Sahara Desert to the American Midwest to the Arctic.

Related: Oil Prices Soar High on Expectations for a New Vaccine Indeed, the world has tremendous renewable energy resources, but often these resources are found far from population centers. For example, the best wind resources in the US can be found in the stretches of Texas and Oklahoma, as well as throughout the sparsely populated central Midwest. Likewise, many of the world’s best solar resources can be found in sparsely populated desert areas.

US National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has stated that the development of renewable power plants on a large scale will require additional transmission lines to overcome regional constraints.

In fact, there is tremendous interest in linking some of these rich renewable resources with population centers via transmission lines, but the costs are often high. These infrastructure projects are generally multibillion dollar projects that also require approval from regulators and landowners.

Obviously, the challenges will be significant. There is always a risk when building the biggest, and this project envisions doing it in three separate categories. That substantially increases the risk of failure. There are many challenges that need to be overcome.

For example, submarine cables usually cross shallow water. In this case, the cable must pass through a deep trench. That, combined with the length that will need to be traversed, will present an unprecedented challenge for ships trying to lay the cables. This is just one example of the type of challenges such megaprojects can face.

In order to estimate the cost of solar power generated by this system, we must make several assumptions. The first is the lifetime of the system. The general rule is that a solar PV system will last around 25 years. The system can still generate power beyond this timeframe, but a significant reduction in power output will occur during this time.

Second, the amount of power generated during that time must be estimated. The capacity factor represents the percentage of energy produced during a period (usually one year) divided by the installed capacity. As solar output varies throughout the day and year – and by location – the capacity factor for solar panels can vary from about 10% to 25%.

For example, if a 10 GW system could run at full output 24 hours a day, it could produce 24 x 365 x 10 = 87,600 GWh per year. Across Australia, the average capacity factor for large-scale PV systems is estimated at 21%. Given the scale and location of Sun Cable’s projects, it is not unreasonable to assume that they can reach a range over a 25% capacity factor.

In this case, over the life of the system, it will yield 87,600 GWh * 25 years * 25% capacity factor = 547,500 GWh power, or 547.5 terawatt-hours (TWh).

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But there are line downsides to consider. Although direct current is a more efficient way of transmitting power over long distances than alternating current, some of the transmitted power is lost as heat. For DC, the line losses depend on the line voltage and the distance over which power is transmitted. Most HVDC lines use a voltage between 100 kilovolts (kV) and 800 kV. Given the strength and distance traveled, the Australia-ASEAN Power Link will probably be at the top end of the scale.

Siemens has stated that for 2.5 GW of power transmitted over 800 km of overhead lines, the line loss at 800 kV HVDC is only 2.6%. Extrapolating that to the full length of the 4,500 km line would imply an overall power loss of 14.6% (assuming losses in underwater HVDC are comparable to those in overhead lines).

Thus, the overall power delivered can be estimated at 547.5 TWh * 85.4% = 467.6 TWh. Then the simple leveled electricity cost resulting from this project would be $ 16 billion divided by 467.6 TWh (which equates to 467.6 billion kilowatt-hours), or $ 0.034 / kWh.

That is an attractive price, but only provides a simple and modest estimate of the capital cost contribution to the project. This needs to be added to ongoing maintenance costs – some of which can be significant if submarine cables require repair – and financing costs. The available solar subsidies, which have also not been considered, could partially cover these costs.

By Robert Rapier

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New South Australian tax on electric vehicles derided as ‘big tax not to pollute’ Living environment | Instant News


The cost of a controversial new electric vehicle in South Australia has been labeled a “no-polluting tax” by electric vehicle industry and policy analysts.

It came when MG launched the lowest priced electric vehicle on the market in Australia – a $ 40,000 crossover SUV – which is about $ 10,000 cheaper than its closest rival, Nissan Leaf.

Noah Schultz-Byard, South Australia director at the Australian Institute, said the decision was deep South Australia – the first in the country to introduce such a charge – will only make it harder for people to use electricity as it gets easier.

“It’s ridiculous to tax cars because they don’t produce pollution. It’s like saying someone who quit smoking doesn’t pay tobacco excise anymore, so they have to pay a fine for giving up, ”said Schultz-Byard.

“One could argue for or against, but now is not the time that the up-front EV costs are still higher than petrol cars. Currently the cost of batteries used for electric vehicles continues to decline and is expected to fall in the coming years.

“Slapping those taxes will only raise the barrier back. This may scare off many people from buying an electric vehicle, which is the opposite of what we want. “

The move was announced in the state budget where treasurer Rob Lucas explained the decision by saying it would make road use more equitable.

Lucas will not be drawn based on the size of the fee but said that it is expected to raise $ 1 million a year from July 2021 and it will cover up-front costs and surcharges for the distance traveled.

“Somebody needs to pay for road maintenance and upgrades, and it should be the people using the road,” Lucas said.

Dr Jake Whitehead, a researcher at the University of Queensland, said this was not piling up because the money generated from road taxes was shared between the state and federal governments.

Less than half of this money is then used for road transport projects, while the remainder is for general income.

“Basically, what they say [to EV owners] is you have to continue to pay stamp duty, registration, and we will charge additional taxes. Fundamental economics is that you raise prices, you lower demand, “said Whitehead.

“What we are seeing is that EVs are being the scapegoats for the reduced fuel excise tax, when in fact the reduction in excise is actually due to more hybrid and fuel-efficient cars being introduced.

“The expected outcome from my point of view, is that you will tax EVs, that would be a disincentive [to buy] EV, the buyer would then buy a hybrid or fuel-efficient vehicle and that would exacerbate the problem with the fuel excise tax. It will only make the problem bigger. “

Behyad Jafari, chairman of the Electric Vehicle Council, said the concern was that South Australia would set a precedent that would lock in bad policies across the country.

“Automotive companies will not bring EVs to our market,” said Jafari. “South Australia has one of the lowest EV absorption in the world and now being the first country in the world to provide a net tax or net disincentive is a wrong move.”

The decision came as a surprise given the country’s recent good work in the area.

South Australia has committed $ 18 million to build nearly 200 new vehicle charging stations and just announced last week it would shift the government fleet to electricity. Energy Minister Dan van Holst Pelletika said the changes would begin soon and were expected to be completed by 2035.

Jafari called the decision to impose the new tax “irritating”.

“South Australia has a net zero emissions target for 2050 and aims to halve its emissions by 2030. Most of their emissions come from the transport sector,” he said.

“They were previously on the right track, but just by taxing electric vehicles like this, their target is window dressing.”

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Regional unions call for increased investment into geothermal in Tuscany, Italy | Think GeoEnergy | Instant News



Carboli Geothermal Power Plant Tuscany, Italy (Source: Enel Green Power Media Library)

Pointing to geothermal’s major role in providing electricity and heat in the Tusany region of Italy, local unions unanimously requested further investment in the development and utilization of geothermal in the region.

This week, Greenreport from Italy, reported that local unions in Tuscany, Italy have unanimously requested increased investment for geothermal development in the region.

“Geothermal energy currently accounts for about 30% of the energy consumed in the Region: this share needs to be increased, increasing cultivation in basins with low enthalpy and most importantly, medium and high”. This is one of the main steps contained in the joint position drawn up by the regional union CGIL-CISL-UIL to take an inventory of the sustainable development issues that will be pursued in the new legislative term that has just opened with the arrival of Eugenio Giani at the helm of the Tuscan council.

The document, given in full by the Tuscany regional body for environmental protection (Arpat), suggests that “Tuscany must significantly increase the share of energy generated from renewable sources”. The context in which geothermal energy plays a major role, starts with the power sector.

To date, geothermal energy has been able to meet about 30% of Tuscan electricity needs – thus meeting the demand for 1,120,000 people -, while helping to make central Italy, the region with the lowest footprint. carbon dioxide state.

Direct use adds to the contribution in terms of electricity: this means ensuring useful heat to heat more than 10,000 residential users and enterprises in the geothermal region, along with about 30 hectares of greenhouses and dairies, as demonstrated by good practice reported by Legambiente in the area. and relating to the Renewable Energy Food Community (CERER).

As evidence of the huge role that geothermal energy can guarantee for Tuscany’s ecological transition, even beyond electricity production alone, Legambiente also highlighted that the only city that can be 100% renewable – taking into account the electricity and thermal needs that Fer has met. [government regulation pertaining to renewable energy] – There are 6 Tuscan geothermal cities throughout central and southern Italy.

Despite the major role played by geothermal energy in Tuscany, no renewable source alone is sufficient to manage the energy transition phase we are experiencing. From geothermal technology we can obtain stable base load energy without CO2 emissions from combustion, through a system that is able to ensure 24/7 functionality regardless of weather conditions, but it is impossible or unwanted to ignore blending with other renewable sources. available in the region.

“Even if geothermal energy plays a fundamental role in meeting regional energy needs, we must invest in an important way – underlining trade unions – also in the growth of other renewable energies such as solar, wind and hydroelectricity. In Tuscany we have the skills and economic resources necessary to make a leap in quality, not only at the environmental level, but also in the “good” jobs that the entire renewable sector can guarantee. “

Source: Greenreport.it

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