Tag Archives: Environment and nature

West Coast Governors Call for COVID Quarantine After Travel | national news | Instant News



“I think it sets the right tone that these states are taking this seriously and that we have a bunch of hot spots in the United States,” Noymer said. “No one wants to become North Dakota.” The travel advisory is not as strict as the rules implemented in June by New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. These three states require travelers to self-quarantine for 14 days and submit forms disclosing personal information if arriving from states with an average of 10 or more new daily cases of coronavirus per 100,000 population over a seven-day period, or Of states where 10% or more of tests have come back positive on average in the past week West coast measurement will add to misery Wednesday, three global airline alliances urged governments to prioritize testing and other measures versus the “brutal instrument” of quarantines. Oneworld, Star Alliance and SkyTeam, which represent 58 airlines, said testing could be part of a comprehensive approach to restart international travel, which is down 92% from pre-COVID-19 levels. Visit California, a non-profit organization promoting state tourism, said the “California tourism businesses are disappointed that the pandemic is forcing this step, but the travel industry understands that long-term recovery is not not possible until COVID-19 rates are under control, ”said Caroline Beteta, president and CEO of Visit California. “Safety remains our top priority.” .



image source

West Coast Governors Call for COVID Quarantine After Travel | national news | Instant News



“I think it sets the right tone that these states are taking this seriously and that we have a bunch of hot spots in the United States,” Noymer said. “No one wants to become North Dakota.” The travel advisory is not as strict as the rules implemented in June by New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. These three states require travelers to self-quarantine for 14 days and submit forms disclosing personal information if arriving from states with an average of 10 or more new daily cases of coronavirus per 100,000 population over a seven-day period, or Of states where 10% or more of tests have come back positive on average in the past week West coast measurement will add to misery Wednesday, three global airline alliances urged governments to prioritize testing and other measures versus the “brutal instrument” of quarantines. Oneworld, Star Alliance and SkyTeam, which represent 58 airlines, said testing could be part of a comprehensive approach to restart international travel, which is down 92% from pre-COVID-19 levels. Visit California, a non-profit organization promoting state tourism, said the “California tourism businesses are disappointed that the pandemic is forcing this step, but the travel industry understands that long-term recovery is not not possible until COVID-19 rates are under control, ”said Caroline Beteta, president and CEO of Visit California. “Safety remains our top priority.” .



image source

Eco-fashion offers a revival of a new Tunisian brand | features | Instant News


MAHDIA, Tunisia – The sun is setting as Tunisian fashion designer Chems Eddine Mechri reaches the cool seaside town of Mahdia. She has spent half a day driving in the scorching heat chasing the precious handmade fabrics she needs for her upcoming winter collection.

With the 125-mile road trip from Tunis coming to an end, the designers knew exactly where it was: the basement of a blue-glowing workshop, hidden in the maze of Mahdia’s old medina, where Mohamed Ismail’s silk weaver’s spinning wheel was still running at full speed.

In a global world dominated by fast fashion brands like Zara, H&M and Topshop, Tunisian designers like Mechri are increasingly returning to their roots, embracing local craftsmen and environmentally conscious materials. Thanks to the ancient North African textile-making traditions, Tunisia is perfect for the eco-fashion they want to strive for.

Returning to the capital city of Tunis, Mechri and her tailors sewed dresses from scratch for her fashion brand, Née. They combine the traditional shimmery pink and gold fabrics used in Tunisian embroidery with netting from the 1960s. The two of them were deemed unsaleable by the merchant Mechri bought them from.

“They (didn’t) suit the tastes of the day,” said Mechri. “And that’s why they (the fabric traders) need us designers … to give these materials a second life.”

The $ 2.6 billion textile industry is a pillar of Tunisia’s economy, employing 160,000 people and generating about 25% of the country’s total exports, according to an estimate by the Oxford Business Group. However, fashion is one of the most polluting industries in the world, responsible for producing 10% of carbon dioxide globally, according to the World Bank, and tens of millions of tonnes of clothing are thrown away each year.

Mechri and other designers have turned to the eco-friendly practice of “recycling” – taking old or unwanted materials and turning them into something new and modern by incorporating high-quality fabrics. Mechri combines old fabrics with the handicrafts of craftsmen all over Tunisia – from embroiderers in Tataouine, on the edge of the desert, to tailors in Bizerte in the country’s north.

Fashion brands in the West are also getting serious about upcycling, including the American brand Bode and Hotel, a Danish-French brand founded by Alexandra Hartmann.

“People are starting to realize the negative effects of having a constant desire to consume all the time without taking a step back, taking pause to reflect and ask questions about the environment and the future of humanity,” Mechri said at his Tunis boutique clothing. on the shelf behind it glittered and rippled to the touch. “Fashion is a smart way to respect local ingredients.”

The desire to honor ancestors is equally important to Hassen Ben Ayech, a 26 year old former computer scientist. He founded the young, upscale Bardo brand with the clear aim of reviving Tunisian heritage and traditional crafts in “an era of uncertainty and fear of environmental destruction, coupled with the slow death of small pockets of culture in the face of globalization.”

The brand’s first collection evokes images of Tunis’s famous Bardo palace and the era of the Beys, the ruler of the Tunisian monarchy which was abolished in 1957.

“We want to go back to the time we missed and avoid cliches,” said Ayech. “We wanted to show that there is more to us than caftans, (and to) dive deeper into our history and identity.”

In 2018, Riad Trabelsi relaunched the French-Tunisian brand BASSCOUTUR to prove to the industry that sustainable fashion is possible on a wider scale. The brand has a growing client base in Japan and South Korea and will soon be launching in Italy.

“We see this concept to be normative. If it’s not sustainable, it’s not cool, “said Trabelsi.

Sofia Guellaty, a Tunisian fashion journalist and founder of MILLE World, an online platform highlighting Arab youth culture, art and fashion, said these brands “use stories from where they come from to make their clothes stand out.”

Ayech said Tunisia’s burgeoning textile industry supports many families with steady incomes even in remote areas and without access to higher education. Businesses that strike a balance between ethical industry practices and community-driven expertise offer Tunisia “hope for a better tomorrow”.

Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

.



image source

Eco-fashion offers a revival of a new Tunisian brand | Entertainment | Instant News


By FRANCESCA EBEL Associated Press

MAHDIA, Tunisia (AP) – The sun is setting as Tunisian fashion designer Chems Eddine Mechri reaches the cool seaside town of Mahdia. She has spent half a day driving in scorching heat in pursuit of the precious handmade fabrics she needs for her upcoming winter collection.

With the 200-kilometer (125-mile) road trip from Tunis coming to an end, the designer knew exactly what it was: the basement of a blue-lit workshop, hidden in the maze of Mahdia’s old medina, where silk weaver Mohamed Ismail’s. the rotating wheel is still running at full speed.

In a global world dominated by fast fashion brands such as Zara, H&M and Topshop, Tunisian designers like Mechri are increasingly returning to their roots, embracing local craftsmen and environmentally conscious materials. Thanks to the ancient North African textile-making traditions, Tunisia is a perfect fit for the eco-fashion they want to strive for.

Ismail has been spinning locally sourced wool and cotton, as well as silk thread imported from China, for the past 47 years. “This work is in our blood … in our DNA,” said Ismail, removing the red silk thread in his workshop. “It’s intergenerational, and for my family, this work is very valuable to us.”

Returning to the capital city of Tunis, Mechri and her tailors sewed dresses from scratch for her fashion brand, Née. They combine the traditional shimmery pink and gold fabrics used in Tunisian embroidery with netting from the 1960s. The two of them were deemed unsaleable by the merchant Mechri bought them from.

.



image source

Amazon fires cause Brazil’s CO2 emissions to spike amid pandemic | National | Instant News


BRASILIA, Brazil – Wildfires have caused carbon dioxide emissions to spike in Brazil over the past two years, undermining President Jair Bolsonaro’s government efforts to restore the country’s environmental credentials.

Emissions jumped 10% in 2019, Bolsonaro’s first year in office, after a decade of minor declines or stagnation, according to a report published Friday by Observatorio do Clima, a network of Brazilian environmental organizations. Preliminary data suggests a new trend will increase by as much as 20% by 2020, even as the pandemic limits the amount of CO2 produced by transportation and industrial activity around the world, the group warned.

“It’s a sizeable increase that is turning Brazil against global trends,” Tasso Azevedo, former head of the Brazilian Forest Service and now in charge of the system for estimating greenhouse gas emissions for the Observatorio do Clima, said in an interview. “It’s basically linked to deforestation; Brazil is moving further away from its Paris Agreement goals.”

The environment ministry did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

Brazil has faced global outrage in the past two years as more fires ravage the Amazon rainforest and Pantanal wetlands. In June, a group of prominent institutional investors managing about $ 3.7 trillion in assets sent a letter to the Brazilian government threatening to withdraw from the country unless environmental metrics improve.

Since then, the government has shifted its strategy and is now asking investors to help the Amazon in unconventional ways, such as sponsoring a patch of rainforest. Government officials led by Vice President Hamilton Mourao are also stepping up efforts to convince the world that Brazil cares about the environment, by visiting the forest this week with a group of diplomats from Europe and Latin America.

The Observatorio do Clima figures place Brazil among the world’s largest emitters of carbon dioxide, after China, the US, Russia, India and the European Union. Deforestation was responsible for 44% of the country’s emissions last year, followed by agriculture, with 28%.

Brazil produced 10.4 tonnes of CO2 per capita in 2019, above the global average of 7.1 tonnes, according to the organization.

Despite the government’s attempts to change the world’s perceptions of Brazil’s environmental policies, Bolsonaro has maintained an aggressive style when it comes to the issue. In a speech at the opening of this year’s United Nations General Assembly, he downplayed the seriousness of the forest fires, saying they were caused by farmers and indigenous peoples “burning their fields in deforested areas.”

Some of his cabinet members went even further. In his 2019 speech, Foreign Minister Ernesto Araujo said the cold May front he was experiencing in Rome was proof that theories about global warming were wrong.

PHOTO (for assistance with pictures, call 312-222-4194): ENV-BRAZIL-AMAZON-FIRES

Copyright 2020 Tribune Content Agency.

.



image source