Tag Archives: exciting

GO NZ: An interesting alternative to popular attractions in New Zealand | Instant News


Stonehenge Aotearoa is a full-scale adaptation of Stonehenge – and a stargazer’s paradise. Photo / Stonehenge Aotearoa.

While previously redundant tourist destinations are becoming more attractive and accessible to the average Kiwi with international borders closed, that doesn’t mean we won’t be competing for space in the busy summer months. Everyone has the same agenda, which means it’s also time to consider alternatives. Of course, there are some experiences – like traversing the volcanic landscape of Tongariro Crossing, or having a cool drink at Hobbiton’s Green Dragon Inn – that just can’t be duplicated.

But others can. If you do a little research, you’ll find that many of New Zealand’s popular attractions have lesser-known partners and are often cheaper. Here are six close siblings of some must-do activities in the country.

Explore shallow hot pools on the fine black volcanic sand at Kawhia hot springs.  Photo / Sally Jackson.
Explore shallow hot pools on the fine black volcanic sand at Kawhia hot springs. Photo / Sally Jackson.

Dig your private spa in the sand

An hour south of Raglan, Kawhia is a quiet seaside village with a harbor full of peas, oysters and mussels. It’s also where you’ll find one of the lesser known hot spring beaches. (Yes, there is more than one.)

The drill is exactly the same as in the Coromandel. At low tide, drive to the end of Ocean Beach Rd, where you’ll find a black, soulless beach above. You have to bring your own shovel. Watch for signs of steam rising from the sand and start digging. Once you reach the hot springs of Te Puia Springs, soak in the knowledge that somewhere across the island, lots of people are screaming for the same thing.

Try one of the world’s best burgers

Oh, Fergburger. Even if you’ve never seen the queues for this Queenstown institution, you’ve probably read blog posts or articles all about the burgers: how juicy the meat is, how tender the bread is and how amazing it is. it’s open for almost 21 hours a day.

What they don’t get romantic about, however, is how long you have to wait in line. If you are too hungry to wait in line, all you need to do is head over to the Devil Burger. Offering a similar product, at the same price, that is what the locals are for.

Seeing kiwis anywhere is special, but conditions on Kapiti Island increase your chances.  Photo / Provided.
Seeing kiwis anywhere is special, but conditions on Kapiti Island increase your chances. Photo / Provided.

Find kiwi in the wild

Thanks to its remote location and difficult sea crossings to get there, Rakiura (Stewart Island) remains relatively flawless compared to other popular tourist destinations. However, it is still struggling under the load of attractive visitors; pre-pandemic, about 44,000 people were visited per year. That’s about 111 tourists for each resident.

The island’s main attraction is the rare opportunity to see kiwis in the wild. It’s home to around 13,000 of New Zealand’s 68,000 kiwi, and the subspecies that live here can sometimes even be seen during the day for insects by the beach.

The catch? If seeing kiwi is your only goal, travel long distances without the guarantee you’ll see it.

Alternatively, there are a number of fenced predator-free shelters on the North Island and South Island that offer nighttime kiwi tours, including Wellington’s Zealandia and Waikato’s Sanctuary Mountain Maungatautari. But the two hour tour presents a very limited window of time for viewing elusive birds, which is why it is so worthwhile to spend a night on Kāpiti Island.

This predator-free island is home to around 1,400 tiny looking kiwis, presenting one of the most reliable opportunities to spot them. Starting at $ 395 per adult ($ 230 per child), Kāpiti Island Nature Tours kiwi-sightseeing packages include transportation, accommodation in a glamping tent or cabin, and guided night tours.

Mount Aspiring National Park offers some of the most impressive walks in the country.  Photo / Provided
Mount Aspiring National Park offers some of the most impressive walks in the country. Photo / Provided

Hike one of New Zealand’s iconic walks

When Lonely Planet released its Ultimate Travel List earlier this month, 13 Kiwi destinations qualified, with Fiordland National Park topping the 29th position.Most visitors opt to take a boat tour through Milford Sound, but that area came first. undeniably the Milford Track. One of New Zealand’s 10 Great Walks, dubbed “the world’s best walk,” takes hikers through valleys carved by glaciers, past ancient rainforests and cascading waterfalls.

However, its reputation means it’s expensive (the hut costs $ 70 per person per night alone) and very difficult to book. Earlier this year, spots on track for the 2020-2021 season were almost sold out within 10 minutes of opening the booking system.

However, even though there are only 10 “Great Streets” in New Zealand, there are dozens of “great roads.”

The closest connection to the Milford Track is the Gillespie Pass Circuit, a 58 km loop best suited for experienced hikers with river crossing skills. Located near Mount Aspiring National Park, it also takes four days, reaches an altitude of 1,600 meters, and has serviced lodges along the way. And on publication, reservations are still available for the hut (only $ 20) during the holiday period.

On a Lake District Adventures nighttime kayaking tour, you'll paddle along the shores of Lake Karapiro to see glowworms.  Photo / Provided.
On a Lake District Adventures nighttime kayaking tour, you’ll paddle along the shores of Lake Karapiro to see glowworms. Photo / Provided.

Experience the magic of collecting glowworms

Waitomo is not the only place where large numbers of glowworms gather. For a cheap and fun version of the same, you can head to the DOC-run Waipū Caves in Northland, which are completely free to access.

If you don’t want to stray far from Waitomo and be in it for glowworms (not caves) sign up for the Lake District Adventures night kayaking tour ($ 109). On a four hour sunset excursion, you will paddle along the shores of Lake Karapiro. As dark falls, you’ll drift silently on the Pokaiwhenua Stream, your path only lighted by glow worms. The effect is very subtle, and with fewer people, your oar hitting the water is the only sound you’ll hear.

Stargazing in the Dark Sky Nature Reserve

Aoraki Mackenzie Dark Sky Reserve is an area known for its low levels of light pollution and many nights with bright stars. Currently, it may be the only one of its kind in the Southern Hemisphere – but it won’t last long. Wairarapa is currently preparing to become the world’s largest Dark Sky Reserve, a designation which is expected to come later this year.

This is where you can experience some of the most unique and personalized astronomy tours in the country. For example, Becky Bateman of the local Under the Stars will bring her telescope straight to your accommodation. Then there’s Stonehenge Aotearoa, a full-scale adaptation of Stonehenge. If you show up on Friday or Saturday at 8:30 p.m., you’ll have the opportunity to look through the telescope and learn how the structure works. General admission is $ 15.

For more New Zealand travel ideas and inspiration, visit newzealand.com

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The second round of the first-class Quaid-e-Azam Cup promises exciting action – Cricket | Instant News


Published in October 31, 2020 9:33 am

The second round starts on Saturday.

KARACHI (Dunya News) – The first round of the 2020-21 first-class Quaid-e-Azam Cup four days resulted in quality cricket as both batsmen and bowlers took full advantage of the conditions offered as four centuries and four five goal catches were recorded in three matches, said official press release.

The second half, which kicks off on Saturday, promises absorption of cricket with players back in the rhythm of the red ball. All eyes are on the National Stadium, where Balochistan and South Punjab face each other after securing a comprehensive win in their tournament opener.

South Punjab Shan Masood very confidently came to the fixture, broadcast live and forwarded worldwide via PCB YouTube channel.

They are the only side to pocket the maximum batting and bowling bonus points when they cross the 400 run mark and knock out opposition under 200 in 100 overs. Of the four centuries that were in print, two came from South Punjab hitters when their captain Shan Masood made 134 and Hussain Talat stroked his way into the girls’ doubles century with 253.

Shan continued to rely on Zahid Mahmood, who turned his team to the win by one innings and 96 runs in three days. The 32 year old Dadu’s birth returns the match number 10-98.

Their opponents, Balochistan, led by Yasir Shah, who holds the record for fastest bowler to the 200 Test wickets in terms of matches, entered the second half with a comfortable 186 run win.

Similar to South Punjab, they racked up the maximum bowling points offered as a pair of pacers Khurram Shehzad (5-27) and the captain himself (4-94) bundled Khyber Pakhtunkhwa for a paltry 167 in return for their first inning of 362, which had been made possible by the keeper. goal-hitter Bismillah Khan third century first class and ball 98 Kashif Bhatti 126.

Yasir finished the contest with eight goals when he combined with Bhatti, the orthodox left arm, to win the match for his team in the final morning session.

After securing a thrilling win over Central Punjab rivals on the brink of stumping on the final day, Sindh moved to the UBL Sports Complex to take on Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, who had just two points and faced a first-half defeat.

While it was the century and five goal shots by veterans Fawad Alam and Tabish Khan that turned the match into Sindh’s advantage, what is especially good for the team led by Sarfaraz Ahmed is the fact that youngsters like Mohammad Asghar, Omair Bin Yousuf, Saud Shakeel and Hasan Mohsin made an important contribution in the second half.

For Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, led by Ashfaq Ahmed, their highest run-getter in the last four days of the Quaid-e-Azam Cup, Sajid Khan shone with the ball, while batsmen Adil Amin and Kamran Ghulam fought. . They do, however, expect more of their players to step up in their second round match.

The NBP Sports Complex hosts Central and North Punjab matches. Azhar Ali, captain of Central Punjab, made the bold decision to beat Sindh with 50 overs remaining on the final day to catch up to 212 runs, which Sarfaraz’s side were overcome with six goals remaining.

Defeat, however, there is a silver lining for the reigning champions with Mohammad Saad scoring two and a half centuries and Ahmed Shehzad marking a return to competitive cricket after injury with 155 69 balls.

Sprinter Hasan Ali, who also returned from injury, threw as many as 32.3 overs over four days and left-arm pioneer Waqas Maqsood finished the match with five goals.

Northern captain Nauman Ali and head coach Mohammad Wasim must have used the two-day break to craft a second-round match plan after facing a crushing loss.

Their notable displays in the opening match were captain himself, Nauman, who took four goals, and versatile Hammad Azam, who put on a 117-ball 79 resistance as Northern followed suit.

Northern are positioned at the bottom of the table with just two points – which they collected to take on more than six South Punjab goals in 100 overs in the first half – Central Punjab, with three points (one batting and two bowling) positioned fourth.

Both Azhar and Nauman are eager to pocket 16 points for the straight win to correct mistakes in the previous match.


Second round schedule (31 Oct – 3 Nov), Karachi


Balochistan v South Punjab – National Stadium

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa v Sindh – UBL Sports Complex

Central Punjab v North – NBP Sports Complex

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GO NZ: New Zealand summer festivals and events to order now | Instant News


We’ve all spent more than enough time looking inside our homes this year. With long awaited warm weather finally creeping up on us, it’s time to let go of those cobwebs and take advantage of all the exciting events and festivals happening around New Zealand this summer – because we’ve had a little fun.

The epicenter for all things edible: Hawke's Bay Food and Wine Classic.  Photo / Kirsten Simcox, Provided
The epicenter for all things edible: Hawke’s Bay Food and Wine Classic. Photo / Kirsten Simcox, Provided

Summer FAWC!

November 6-15

Arguably New Zealand’s center for great food and fine wine, Hawke’s Bay hosts 10 days and over 60 events for this delicious festival. The Food and Wine Classic features the best of local restaurants, wineries, brewers and producers joining forces for an unforgettable program, in some of the country’s most stunning locations, from street food festivals to exclusive evenings combining art and food and honeycomb to tables high tea. see fawc.co.nz for details.

Nothing says Summer like the Black Hats at Oval Bay.  Photo / Andrew Cornaga, Photosport, Files
Nothing says Summer like the Black Hats at Oval Bay. Photo / Andrew Cornaga, Photosport, Files

Summer Cricket

starting 27 November

Nothing says Summer is like the start of a five-day trial match, and despite what 2020 throws at the world, the Black Caps will face Australia, Bangladesh, West Indies and Pakistan in the upcoming 2020-21 season. Games will be played across the country, and include T-20, ODI and test matches. see nzc.nz for all the details.

The biggest exhibit in the history of the Auckland Art Gallery: Toi o Tamaki at Britomart.  Photo / Patrick Reynolds, Given
The biggest exhibit in the history of the Auckland Art Gallery: Toi o Tamaki at Britomart. Photo / Patrick Reynolds, Given

You you you or

December 5 – March 31

Staged in the heart of Britomart, this is the official Toi tū Toi ora satellite show at the Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand’s largest contemporary Māori art exhibition in nearly 20 years, including 300 works by more than 120 Māori artists. see aucklandartgallery.com for more details.

Incredible creation: The World of Wearable Art at Te Papa.  Photo / Provided
Incredible creation: The World of Wearable Art at Te Papa. Photo / Provided

Wearable Art World: Up Close

12 December – 14 February

If you’ve ever wondered what actually goes into these incredible creations, here’s your chance to experience a World of Wearable Art like never before. The in-depth exhibition at Wellington’s Te Papa showcases more than 30 extraordinary outfits from the world’s leading clothing arts competitions, with visitors able to explore the creativity and extraordinary detail of the clothes and the stories behind the designs. see

for more information.

It's finally here: The America's Cup World Series takes over Auckland's waterfront.  Photo / Richard Gladwell, Sail-World.com, Files
It’s finally here: The America’s Cup World Series takes over Auckland’s waterfront. Photo / Richard Gladwell, Sail-World.com, Files

America’s Cup

starting December 17th

Finally it’s here. Auckland is set to host the 36th Copa America and the action starts this December. There are three events that round out the race for the Cup – the Auckland American Cup World Series brings together three challengers against the Emirates New Zealand Team for the Christmas Cup starting 17 December, before the Prada Cup – and the scramble to take on Team NZ for the big – starts on January 15. The final series of races for the America’s Cup runs from March 6 to 21. There will definitely be a lot of events going on in and around the Viaduct as the action heats up. check aucklandnz.com for details when released.

Great acoustics, unbeatable atmosphere: Black Barn Amphitheater, Havelock North.  Photo / Glenn Taylor, Hawke's Bay Today
Great acoustics, unbeatable atmosphere: Black Barn Amphitheater, Havelock North. Photo / Glenn Taylor, Hawke’s Bay Today

Black Barn Concert Series

Starting December 19

This amphitheater in the Hawke’s Bay vineyard is widely considered to be one of New Zealand’s best outdoor spots, with great acoustics and an unbeatable atmosphere. This summer, check out an outdoor cinema that opens as part of the Hawke’s Bay Outdoor Film Festival from December 27th. If you want a little music, summer queues are still in the works, but it’s confirmed, Kiwi legend Dave Dobbyn will be performing alongside 2020 local darling The Beths on December 19. Tickets start at $ 69, look blackbarn.com for details.

Distinction Hotels Te Anau Tennis Invitational

December 28-29

It’s a shame the ASB Classic has been postponed for 2021 (thanks Covid), but this annual tournament features some of New Zealand’s strongest male tennis players over two days of action in a relaxed atmosphere, perfect for the whole family. General admission is $ 15.00 per adult and children are free. see teanautennis.co.nz for details.

The Other Side Festival

December 30 – 31

Whangamatā, usually considered a quintessential Kiwi beach town, holds this two-day music festival at the mysterious-sounding Joe’s Farm, just outside the summer hot spot. Visitors can camp on site, or take a bus to see a lineup of famous Kiwi artists such as Shapeshifter, LAB, David Dallas and JessB. Tickets start at $ 118 from theotherside.nz.

Soundsplash

January 22-24

Happy 20th birthday to Raglan’s favorite. This summer’s favorite celebrates milestones in style, with lineups of local legends including Fat Freddy’s Drop, Ladi6, Che Fu and Home Brew taking to four stages at the Wainui Reserve, while markets also return. see soundsplash.co.nz for more details.

Saturday Six60 Tour

Various dates in January and February

They are arguably New Zealand’s biggest band, and now Six60 have their gigs on the road, visiting new cities and big venues on six Saturdays in January and February. Starting in Lower Hutt and stopping at Waitangi, Hastings, New Plymouth, Christchurch, Wellington and Hamilton along the way, they’ll have special guests and big hits of their own. see six60.co.nz for details.

    The Tussock Traverse is one of New Zealand's most beautiful courses.  Photo / Kurt Matthews, Given
The Tussock Traverse is one of New Zealand’s most beautiful courses. Photo / Kurt Matthews, Given

Tussock Traverse

January 30th

The Ruapehu region is an outdoor lover’s paradise and the Tussock Traverse is one of New Zealand’s most beautiful and diverse courses. Events for hikers and runners – ranging from 6 km to 50 km – offer something for everyone who wants a different challenge. This event supports the Tongariro Project (Tongariro Natural History Society), and the work they are doing to preserve this spectacular area. see tussocktraverse.co.nz for entry details.

A celebration of cunning and speed: Burt Munro Challenge, Invercargill.  Photo / James Jubb, Given
A celebration of cunning and speed: Burt Munro Challenge, Invercargill. Photo / James Jubb, Given

Burt Munro’s challenge

February 10-14

This Southland classic has cemented its name as one of New Zealand’s premier motor sporting events. Over the course of five action-packed days, a number of racing disciplines will race including hill climbing, beach racing, sprint racing, speedway and road racing. And the whole festival honors the legendary Burt, his ingenuity, determination and love of speed and motorbikes. see burtmunrochallenge.co.nz for more details.

Two great nights: Hamilton Garden Arts Festival.  Photo / Mark Hamilton, Supplied Visit Waikato
Two great nights: Hamilton Garden Arts Festival. Photo / Mark Hamilton, Supplied Visit Waikato

Hamilton Park Arts Festival

February 19 – March 1

What is now an iconic outdoor summer festival for the city, the Hamilton Park Arts Festival combines visual arts, music, comedy, film, theater, literature and dance for two weeks of fun. This festival has been Waikato’s premier arts event for over 20 years and the 2021 list will be released any time. see hgaf.co.nz for the latest news and announcements.

Flying circus: New Zealand's best viewing team at Wings over Wairarapa.  Photo / Provided
Flying circus: New Zealand’s best viewing team at Wings over Wairarapa. Photo / Provided

Air Wing Festival Over Wairarapa

February 26 – 28

With the Wānaka sisters’ event canceled this year due to Covid-19, this Wairarapa favorite will be New Zealand’s first major air show in two years. In addition to the spectacular flying program, there are fantastic ground shows, as well as activities for kids little and big. Previous events have drawn crowds of 25,000 people – almost the equivalent of the entire Masterton population – so we know it’s the weekend Kiwis will be lining up to be a part of. see wings.org.nz for more details.

For more New Zealand travel ideas and inspiration, visit newzealand.com

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