Tag Archives: Facebook

“Hey Facebook” voice recognition will be added to Oculus Quest; it can match Apple’s Siri | Instant News






Facebook wants to add “Hey Facebook”, which is a voice recognition function similar to Siri. (
Justin Doherty of Pexels
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The rise in the penetration rate of virtual assistants is mainly led by Apple’s Siri and Amazon’s Alexa. Now, as the brewing battle between Apple and Facebook continues, the latter also plans to match its rival’s features with its “Hey Facebook” for Oculus VR platform Portal.

“Hey Facebook” will be your newest companion in the Facebook platform

According to the official blog eye The social media company stated on Facebook on February 25 that it had not found a way to interact with virtual reality in the past few years.

Previously, commands could only be enabled by using hands and voice. You can also use the Oculus Touch controller.

In mid-2020, Facebook will include voice commands in Oculus Quest, so players can use it without using their fingers. Before indicating a function, you can view the function in the main menu or click the controller button twice.

Those who use Oculus Quest can now enjoy the experience without using their hands. They only need to say the voice command “Hey Facebook”.

You can now access commands such as screenshot requests, or you can show the user commands that are online among friends. This hands-free advantage no longer allows you to scroll endlessly to what you want to see or learn.

It also allows the user to use the game controller without touching the touchpad, so it is produced entirely by the mouth. You can also save the game without having to read all hidden files carefully.

In addition, you can also say “Hey Portal” to command Facebook’s smart devices. “Hey, Facebook” is similar to other voice recognition functions developed by other technology companies.

Please also read: TikTok Silhouette Challenge No Filter Tutorial: How to Remove the Red Filter

Facebook proposed this idea in order to provide users with more convenience, so after issuing the command, the device will obtain the recording and then transcribe the user’s words.

In addition, this California-based conglomerate is not mandatory to operate. Disable it first, so you must choose whether to use it according to your preferences.

According to the company, Portal will continue to receive commands until you turn off the microphone.

When the device recognizes the wake-up command, an indicator will also be displayed at the bottom of the screen. This is the starting point of the two processes of recording and transcription.

Another tip for privacy issues

In the report 9To5Mac, Despite its amazing voice command capabilities, concerns about privacy continue to accumulate on Facebook. Users are likely to be very careful about data collected without permission.

Compared with Apple’s voice assistant Siri, the company guarantees that its devices will not collect any data from users through its Apple servers. For users who have used Siri, commands can even be used offline. This is because Apple built the AI ​​programmed in the device chip.

Facebook stated that “Hey Facebook” will first be released on Oculus Ques 2, and then be available on all Quest devices this week. The remaining features will be announced soon.

related articles: The release date, price and details of Oculus Quest 3 are leaked: Will the VR headset get a new refresh rate and chipset?

This article is owned by Science and Technology Times.

Written by Joen Coronel



Ⓒ2018 TECHTIMES.com reserves all rights. Do not copy without permission.

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Australia leads the way v. Big Tech, now Congress has to follow | Instant News


The Australian Parliament has pass the Media Bargain Code become law. What is Congress waiting for?

Lawmakers from both sides of the US have been making a lot of noise about the crackdown on Big Tech, but actual legislation with any hope of passing remains nowhere in sight. An obvious first step would be to copy laws from Down Under, which would force Facebook and Google to pay media companies for news content that generates big bucks for the tech company.

The two companies are trying to avoid the Aussies from moving forward, and Facebook it even blocks Australian news from its website last week, along with an “accidental” blockage of the government’s public info release. But it didn’t work.

Yes, Facebook won some concessions, however, the law still sets the milestone of the first law that forced Big Tech to share the huge profits it made from other people’s intellectual property. Pew Research Center reports that employment in US newspapers has fallen by more than 50 percent since 2008, driven by falling ad revenue – even as Google and Facebook together collect about three-quarters of all online ad revenue.

Now Canada was looking to follow Australia; Germany, France, Finland and others are also interested.

The DPR Judiciary Committee started see statute to let small US news organizations bargain collectively with Google and Facebook, but that is nothing without a bipartisan push toward legislation like Australia.

If anyone can provide the “unity” Washington the president continues to talk about, it is the impetus to make Big Tech pay for what is now being exploited for free.

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As business travel declines, Airbnb sees opportunity in remote work travel | Instant News



While business travel has been one of the victims of the coronavirus pandemic, Airbnb plans to capitalize on the new work-life balance that has emerged during the shift to remote working. Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky told CNBC’s Jim Cramer on Thursday that the home rental company is seeing signs that consumers are taking advantage of the anywhere work model that businesses are embracing to get out of their homes and get a change of scenery. “The lines between travel and living are starting to blur,” he said in an interview with “Mad Money”. . As opposed to just renting Airbnb sites for vacations, more and more people are using rental for living purposes, said Chesky, who bought out the company he founded last year. The IPO, originally slated for early 2020, was postponed later in the year due to uncertainty surrounding the global pandemic. The travel industry has been one of the hardest hit parts of the economy due to lockdowns that have been put in place around the world to contain Covid-19. Remote workers now have even more flexibility, choosing to take more three-day weekends or move into homes for longer periods of time than before, as long as the internet is available to connect to Zoom for business purposes, Chesky said. “We think a lot of the trips will be in small towns because people are going to get in the car and travel nearby,” he said. “We are really adaptable and resilient to any type of travel behavior. This is what we learned last year,” he added. The comments come after Airbnb published its first quarterly report. as a state-owned company Airbnb said it had fourth-quarter revenue of $ 859 million, compared to FactSet’s estimate of $ 747 million, and a net loss of $ 3.89 billion. Much of the loss was blamed on fees billed to it at the end of last year. To date, the stock is up 24%.



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Australia passed laws to make Google, Facebook pay for news | Instant News


CANBERRA, Australia (AP) – An Australian law that forces Google and Facebook to pay for news is ready to go into effect, although the law’s architects say it will take time for the digital giants to strike a media deal.

Parliament on Thursday passed the latest amendment to the so-called News Media Bargaining Code agreed between Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg on Tuesday.

In return for the changes, Facebook agreed to lift restrictions on Australians from accessing and sharing news.

Rod Sims, the competition regulator who designed the code, said he was pleased that the amended law would address the market imbalance between Australian news publishers and the two gateways to the internet.

“All good signs,” said Sims.

“The purpose of this code is to clearly demonstrate the market power that Google and Facebook have. Google and Facebook need media, but they don’t need specific media companies, and that means media companies can’t enter into commercial deals, ”added the chairman of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.

Other laws were passed in Parliament before, so they can now be implemented.

Google has struck deals with major Australian news businesses in recent weeks including News Corp. and Seven West Media.

Frydenberg said he was pleased to see Google and Facebook’s recent progress in reaching a commercial deal with the Australian news business.

But Australia’s Country Press, which represents 161 regional newspapers across the country, has raised concerns that small publications outside the big cities may be left behind.

Sims said he was not surprised that the platform would strike deals with big city businesses first.

“I see no reason why anyone doubts that all journalism will benefit,” said Sims.

“It takes time there. Google and Facebook don’t have unlimited resources to talk to everyone. I think there is still a long way to go, “he added.

Chris Moos, a lecturer at the University of Oxford Business School, said the latest amendment was a “small victory” for Zuckerberg.

Moos said the law would likely result in small payments for most Australian news publishers. But Facebook can again block Australian news if negotiations fail.

The laws are designed to curb Facebook and Google’s excessive bargaining power in their negotiations with Australian news providers. The digital giants will not be able to abuse their position by offering news businesses an accept or leave payment for their journalism. Conversely, in case of a deadlock, the arbitration panel will make a binding decision on the winning bid.

Frydenberg and Facebook confirmed that both parties agreed to the proposed amendments to the law. The changes will provide digital platforms with one month’s notice before being officially assigned under code. That will give those involved more time for intermediary agreements before they are forced to enter into binding arbitration arrangements.

Facebook Vice President Global Affairs Nick Clegg said on Wednesday that Australian law, without amendments this week, would allow media conglomerates to “ask for a blank check.”

“Thankfully, after further discussion, the Australian government has agreed on changes which mean fair negotiations are pushed without the threat of looming over unpredictable arbitration,” Clegg, the former UK deputy prime minister, wrote in a Facebook post.

Facebook last week prevented Australians from sharing news, but it also blocked access to pandemic, public health and emergency services.

The blockade was the response of the House of Representatives who issued the code last week in a form that Facebook deemed “unworkable”.

Clegg said Facebook had “erred on the side of excessive law enforcement” and “some content was accidentally blocked.”

Both Google and Facebook are pursuing Australian media deals under their own licensing models, Google News Showcase and Facebook News.

But media executives argue that such a deal would not be possible without threats from the arbitration panel making the final decision.

Frydenberg said his department would review the code within a year to “ensure it delivers results consistent with government policy intent.”

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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Australia passed a law to make Google, Facebook pay for news after breaking a deal with Zuckerberg | Instant News


An Australian law that forces Google and Facebook to pay for news is ready to go into effect, although the law’s architects say it will take time for the digital giants to strike a media deal.

Parliament on Thursday passed the latest amendment to the so-called News Media Bargaining Code agreed between Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg on Tuesday.

In return for the changes, Facebook agreed to lift restrictions on Australians from accessing and sharing news.

Rod Sims, the competition regulator who designed the code, said he was pleased that the amended law would address the market imbalance between Australian news publishers and the two gateways to the internet.

“All good signs,” said Sims.

“The purpose of this code is to clearly demonstrate the market power that Google and Facebook have. Google and Facebook need media, but they don’t need specific media companies, and that means media companies can’t enter into commercial deals, ”added the chairman of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.

Other laws were passed in Parliament before, so they can now be implemented.

Google has struck deals with major Australian news businesses in recent weeks including News Corp. and Seven West Media.

Frydenberg said he was pleased to see Google and Facebook’s recent progress in reaching a commercial deal with the Australian news business.

But Australia’s Country Press, which represents 161 regional newspapers across the country, has raised concerns that small publications outside the big cities may be left behind.

Sims said he was not surprised that the platform would strike deals with big city businesses first.

“I see no reason why anyone doubts that all journalism will benefit,” said Sims.

“It takes time there. Google and Facebook don’t have unlimited resources to talk to everyone. I think there is still a long way to go, “he added.

Chris Moos, a lecturer at the University of Oxford Business School, said the latest amendment was a “small victory” for Zuckerberg.

Moos said the law would likely result in small payments for most Australian news publishers. But Facebook can again block Australian news if negotiations fail.

The laws are designed to curb Facebook and Google’s excessive bargaining power in their negotiations with Australian news providers. The digital giants will not be able to abuse their position by offering news businesses an accept or leave payment for their journalism. Conversely, in case of a deadlock, the arbitration panel will make a binding decision on the winning bid.

Frydenberg and Facebook confirmed that both parties agreed to the proposed amendments to the law. The changes will provide digital platforms with one month’s notice before being officially assigned under code. That will give those involved more time for intermediary agreements before they are forced to enter into binding arbitration arrangements.

Facebook Vice President Global Affairs Nick Clegg said on Wednesday that Australian law, without amendments this week, would allow media conglomerates to “ask for a blank check.”

“Thankfully, after further discussion, the Australian government has agreed on changes which mean fair negotiations are pushed without the threat of looming over unpredictable arbitration,” Clegg, the former UK deputy prime minister, wrote in a Facebook post.

Facebook last week prevented Australians from sharing news, but it also blocked access to pandemic, public health and emergency services.

The blockade was the response of the House of Representatives who issued the code last week in a form that Facebook deemed “unworkable”.

Clegg said Facebook had “erred on the side of excessive law enforcement” and “some content was accidentally blocked.”

Both Google and Facebook are pursuing Australian media deals under their own licensing models, Google News Showcase and Facebook News.

But media executives argue that such a deal would not be possible without threats from the arbitration panel making the final decision.

Frydenberg said his department would review the code within a year to “ensure it delivers results consistent with government policy intent.”

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