Tag Archives: failure

‘Common’ treatment-related harm in New Zealand – the Otago study | Instant News


Older people and those prescribed multiple drugs are most at risk of exposure to treatment-related harm, a new study from the University of Otago shows.

The study, published in the British Journal of General Practice, reviewed the electronic records of 9,076 randomly selected patient records from 44 general practices in New Zealand in an attempt to identify and explain all treatment-related hazards.

Dr. Sharon Leitch.

Lead author Dr Sharon Leitch, senior lecturer in the Department of Public Practice and Rural Health, said while the study found the dangers associated with treatment were “common, most are minor and thought to be preventable”, nearly 20 percent of the hazards are preventable and that area needs to be addressed.

In the three years from 2011 to 2013, 7,308 out of 9,076 patients had undergone treatment by a general practitioner. Nearly a quarter (24 percent) of these recipes caused damage.

Damage was assessed as minor (such as rash or vomiting), moderate (such as untreated anemia, poor diabetes control), severe (including renal failure, pulmonary embolism or morphine overdose) and death.

Most of the damage was minor (80 percent), but one in five was moderate or severe and in three cases fatal. Eighteen patients were admitted to the hospital.

“This is an area we need to try to address through targeted patient safety initiatives.

“Medicine can be both harmful and healing. This study highlights the importance of taking medication only when needed and reinforces the need for alertness and care even in routine medication use, ”said Dr Leitch.

Patients most at risk for treatment-related harm are older, and those who have multiple consultations and multiple prescriptions. Patients between the ages of 60 and 74 were twice as likely to have been injured, while those over 75 were three times as likely.

“Identifying these patients can help inform joint decision-making when prescribing and targeting risk monitoring. Patients should discuss any concerns about their medication and health with their healthcare provider. Sometimes it is useful to include whanau in the discussion. “

This is the first time such research has been conducted.

“We did this research to find out what is happening in general New Zealand practice, to determine the risks posed by treatment in the real world.

“Treatment safety is a health care priority – we want to help patients, not hurt them. “General practice has been considered a safe place for patients, without much research in this area,” said Dr Leitch.

Read the full journal article published in the British Journal of General Practice

/ Public Release. This material comes from the original organization and may be point-in-time, edited for clarity, style and length. view more here.

.



image source

Fiasco at HEC | Instant News


Former HEC chairman Dr Tariq Banuri.

One of the most laudable decisions Prime Minister Imran Khan took after taking office was to avoid rushing into trying to reverse everything his predecessors had done. Among the beneficiaries of this policy is the higher education reform agenda.

Five years earlier, the PML-N government had opted for the zero reform path, choosing to do basically nothing that would disrupt the diverse special interests that dominate public sector universities across the country. This means that the Higher Education Commission (HEC) is left to the academic bureaucracy that dominates the organization.

At the end of the PML-N term in 2018, the process of selecting a new chairman of the HEC came to a conclusion. In part, because of missed opportunities for reform, and partly because of the relative confidence level of the selection process, a large number of highly qualified candidates are applying for the role. Finally, Dr. Tariq Banuri was elected as the chairman of HEC.

Originally a member of Central Superior Services, Dr Banuri received his PhD from Harvard University. He worked in various international think-tank organizations and institutions. He founded the Institute for Sustainable Development Policy in the early 1990s, and later became a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) which won the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. Dr Banuri’s last assignment at the United Nations was as Director of the Sustainable Development Division. Over the past decade or so, he has been a professor at the University of Utah. When he came to HEC in 2018, he did so with hesitation, having reached the top of every mountain he climbed in his illustrious career.

Dr Atta ur Rehman, former chair of the HEC where the bureaucracy was originally employed, and Dr Banuri represent two different philosophies in terms of their vision for higher education. Dr Atta believes that more graduates, more universities and more funding for universities are essential for Pakistan’s future. Dr Banuri believes that graduates who cannot write coherent paragraphs, universities that cannot maintain quality in the classroom, and unlimited funding without accountability are just as bad as fewer graduates, fewer universities, and limited funding. Since becoming chairman of the HEC, he has worked to transform the potential of Pakistani universities, from degree-granting bodies to institutions of learning. This is a tough task.

The government’s hasty and unfavorable approach in its bid to move away from Tariq Banuri cannot tarnish the reputation of its decades-long struggle for a better country and a better world. But this has revealed how much more difficult it is to engage in actual reform, than to talk about it. The failures at HEC are not the only ones to hit Pakistan, but offer instructive insights into the reality of the word reform, and the challenges facing real reformers.

In every area, the status quo exists because it generates rents or benefits to people who would otherwise not be able to get what they are getting. So, for example, the reason PIA is so bad at being an airline is because it is filled with people who have no business running an airline. These people were the most important stakeholders in the PIA ‘reform’. This includes pilots and flight crew, but also includes flight engineers, and ground staff. It also includes cooks and gardeners and airport check-in staff and baggage handlers.

Together, these ecosystems of individuals, subgroups and groups make up what we call ‘Resistance’. Now, remember, unlike you (the newspaper reader), or me (the open writer), The Resistance doesn’t just engage in conversation about PIA for laughter. For The Resistance, PIA reform is a matter of life and death. When the reformers talk about the PIA’s world-beating employee to aircraft ratio, what they are really saying is: fire some people. Those ‘few people’ are The Resistance. They will not give up their work as easily as the newspaper readers put down the newspaper, or opinion writers will find other topics to write about. No, ma’am. The resistance will fight for its work. To death.

Higher education is much more serious than PIA. PIA are several aircraft. Higher education is dozens of very large public sector universities, dozens of private universities, and millions of students. And of course, the teachers. Thousands of teachers.

Are Pakistani university teachers any good? Just as the PIA has some good pilots and maybe even some high-performing cabin crew, there are also some good university teachers in Pakistan. But the ratio between the bad and the good is overwhelming. At PIA, this means an airline that is completely broken, bankrupt and cannot be redeemed. In higher education, this means damaged, damaged, and irredeemable universities. Dozens of them. A failed PIA will make Pakistan less attractive to investors, less competitive and less accessible. But is the higher education sector failing? A failing higher education sector could make Pakistan less state and less of a society.

Have an honest conversation with any employer and they’ll tell you: graduates of Pakistan’s education system are uncompetitive, have no salable cognitive or non-cognitive skills, and can’t innovate or operate out of the box.

Dr Banuri’s agenda as a reformer is extraordinary and unmistakable: improve the quality of teaching and assessment, so that Pakistani university graduates leave the system with skills that make them employable.

To enact reforms, one must always anger people. In higher education, three generations of mediocrity and disability need to be shaken, moved, beaten and taken out, never to be seen again. There is only one way to approach these reforms. With a clear head, and clear eyes. That’s the path Dr Banuri took for nearly two and a half years as chairman of the HEC. The reforms imposed a heavy price on status quo bearers. The old guard fought back. He didn’t want his privileges to be challenged.

The giving of free scholarships is replaced with accuracy. The result is less scholarships. Free grants for centers of excellence that should be replaced with questions about delivery and performance. The result is silence. Lifetime free work is challenged with questions about teaching and publications, and with questions about the quality of those publications. The result was rebellion. The rebellion has succeeded in replacing due process with a pathetic and degrading campaign of slander. Several things can tarnish the good name of world champions like Dr Banuri. But the whole world is watching what Pakistan is doing to its talents: young and old.

He starves his children for a high-quality education, and he punishes parents with slander. In doing so, it values ​​the mediocrity and the meek, and maintains its place as an economically challenged third world country that cannot assemble a single narrative of sustainable and coherent advantage. In any field.

From the production and use of vaccines, to compliance with the international financial system, to the acceptance of hegemonic thugs, to the very low levels of learning from elementary school to university – the roots of Pakistan’s misfortune are its own consequences. The essence of each is The Resistance. Strives steadfastly to keep things as they are.

Years from now, Prime Minister Imran Khan will be remembered for many good things. But he will also be remembered for how he stood with The Resistance. Hold on not to change. Resistance to reform. Resistance to accountability. Tehreek-e-Insaf? Saying the full name of his own party out loud must feel like a cruel joke, even to someone full of faith and confidence like PM Khan. What a shame. Not so much for Dr Banuri, but for the millions of students who were poorer by his departure.

The author is an analyst and commentator.

.



image source

Covid 19 coronavirus: Five ways New Zealand can strengthen its borders | Instant News


Public health experts have multiplied calls for a “benchmarking exercise” with Australia on Covid-19 and border management. Photo / Dean Purcell

Public health experts have multiplied calls for a “benchmarking exercise” with Australia on Covid-19 and border management, after picking out more than a dozen New Zealand failures so far.

In a blog post published todayThe University of Otago research team argues that New Zealand still does not have optimal control over its borders against Covid-19, and defines five ways to combat further leakage – including offering vaccinations to arriving travelers.

Their analysis found that, since last July, there have been 13 identified border failures, along with six failures that occurred in managed isolation and quarantine (MIQ) facilities.

The largest resulted in August’s Auckland cluster, which involved 179 cases and three deaths – and was one of two failures that forced the city to be isolated on three occasions.

The researchers cited official estimates that put the daily costs of locking Auckland up to $ 75 million in GDP, along with 250 job losses.

Overall, however, they said New Zealand had done “very well” with the pandemic response, which was among the best in the world.

While the vaccine rollout that started with border workers was a welcome development, they said a “green zone” of New Zealand’s quarantine-free travel to form with Australia would present more challenges.

“This green zone means our biosecurity status will be more linked to Australia,” they said.

Therefore, it is even more important to reduce the risk of border failures that could disrupt green zone travel, especially if the outbreak is initially insufficiently contained.

“This situation provides us with an opportunity to compare our current measures with those used by the eight states and territories in Australia.”

Among the five measures they recommend is slashing the number of infected travelers arriving at MIQ facilities – something that means receiving fewer arrivals from “red zone” countries such as the US, UK and India, along with extra measures such as pre-departure testing.

All returnees may also be offered vaccination on arrival.

“While this will only offer partial immunity while in MIQ, it may still be of benefit.”

They are again making a case for only using MIQ facilities in major cities for the lowest-risk travelers – such as those from Australia until the bubble opens – and exploring purpose-built facilities away from city centers.

In addition, they said all MIQ areas that were shared, such as those used for sports and smoking, were removed, with the requirement for returnees to stay in their rooms as was the case in Australia.

“There should be practical support for returnees who wish to exercise in their rooms, and smokers should be offered nicotine replacement therapy and other smoking cessation care and support.”

Finally, they are calling for a daily PCR-based saliva testing mandate for MIQ workers.

“This option could also be explored for travelers in MIQ in addition to the current testing regimen to allow for comparative assessments,” they said.

“This test is used in parts of Australia and in other countries.”

The researchers go on to suggest New Zealand should aim to have a “failure rate” compared to Australia.

“As of March 29, New Zealand’s MIQ system had a seven-day average turnover of four new positive cases per day – suggesting that the risk of transmission in MIQ may still be large,” they said.

“To ensure the success of the upcoming quarantine-free green zone between New Zealand and Australia, more preventive interventions are needed to reduce the frequency of these failures.

“Conducting MIQ benchmarking exercises and broader border management measures in Australian states and territories can identify potential improvements in policy and practice in both countries.”

Yesterday, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern – who will announce a start date for next week’s bubble – said arrangements with Australia were still being worked out.

While he did not share specifics on the criteria for closing borders in a particular outbreak, Ardern pointed out the importance of providing predictability to tourists.

That includes telling them how prepared they are, if they have to stay where they are in the event of a border closure.

He also gave some indications of how New Zealand might interact with the separate states.

“Yes, there really is a possibility that if a country has an outbreak, if we believe that border controls are in place, we can shut down that state, while continuing to travel elsewhere.”

.



image source

Fiasco at HEC | Instant News


One of the most laudable decisions Prime Minister Imran Khan took after taking office was to avoid rushing into trying to reverse everything his predecessors had done. Among the beneficiaries of this policy is the higher education reform agenda.

Five years earlier, the PML-N government had opted for the zero reform path, choosing to do basically nothing that would disrupt the diverse special interests that dominate public sector universities across the country. This means that the Higher Education Commission (HEC) is left to the academic bureaucracy that dominates the organization.

At the end of the PML-N term in 2018, the process of selecting a new chairman of the HEC came to a conclusion. In part, because of missed opportunities for reform, and partly because of the relative confidence level of the selection process, a large number of highly qualified candidates are applying for the role. Finally, Dr. Tariq Banuri was elected as the chairman of HEC.

Originally a member of Central Superior Services, Dr Banuri received his PhD from Harvard University. He worked in various international think-tank organizations and institutions. He founded the Institute for Sustainable Development Policy in the early 1990s, and later became a member of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) which won the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. Dr Banuri’s last assignment at the United Nations was as Director of the Sustainable Development Division. Over the past decade or so, he has been a professor at the University of Utah. When he came to HEC in 2018, he did so with hesitation, having reached the top of every mountain he climbed in his illustrious career.

Dr Atta ur Rehman, former chair of the HEC where the bureaucracy was originally employed, and Dr Banuri represent two different philosophies in terms of their vision for higher education. Dr Atta believes that more graduates, more universities and more funding for universities are essential for Pakistan’s future. Dr Banuri believes that graduates who cannot write coherent paragraphs, universities that cannot maintain quality in the classroom, and unlimited funding without accountability are just as bad as fewer graduates, fewer universities, and limited funding. Since becoming chairman of the HEC, he has worked to transform the potential of Pakistani universities, from degree-granting bodies to institutions of learning. This is a tough task.

The government’s hasty and unfavorable approach in its bid to move away from Tariq Banuri cannot tarnish the reputation of its decades-long struggle for a better country and a better world. But this has revealed how much more difficult it is to engage in actual reform, than to talk about it. The failures at HEC are not the only ones to hit Pakistan, but offer instructive insights into the reality of the word reform, and the challenges facing real reformers.

In every area, the status quo exists because it generates rents or benefits to people who would otherwise not be able to get what they are getting. So, for example, the reason PIA is so bad at being an airline is because it is filled with people who have no business running an airline. These people were the most important stakeholders in the PIA ‘reform’. This includes pilots and flight crew, but also includes flight engineers, and ground staff. It also includes cooks and gardeners and airport check-in staff and baggage handlers.

Together, these ecosystems of individuals, subgroups and groups make up what we call ‘Resistance’. Now, remember, unlike you (the newspaper reader), or me (the open writer), The Resistance doesn’t just engage in conversation about PIA for laughter. For The Resistance, PIA reform is a matter of life and death. When the reformers talk about the PIA’s world-beating employee to aircraft ratio, what they are really saying is: fire some people. Those ‘few people’ are The Resistance. They will not give up their work as easily as the newspaper readers put down the newspaper, or opinion writers will find other topics to write about. No, ma’am. The resistance will fight for its work. To death.

Higher education is much more serious than PIA. PIA are several aircraft. Higher education is dozens of very large public sector universities, dozens of private universities, and millions of students. And of course, the teachers. Thousands of teachers.

Are Pakistani university teachers any good? Just as the PIA has some good pilots and maybe even some high-performing cabin crew, there are also some good university teachers in Pakistan. But the ratio between the bad and the good is overwhelming. At PIA, this means an airline that is completely broken, bankrupt and cannot be redeemed. In higher education, this means damaged, damaged, and irredeemable universities. Dozens of them. A failed PIA will make Pakistan less attractive to investors, less competitive and less accessible. But is the higher education sector failing? A failing higher education sector could make Pakistan less state and less of a society.

Have an honest conversation with any employer and they’ll tell you: graduates of Pakistan’s education system are uncompetitive, have no salable cognitive or non-cognitive skills, and can’t innovate or operate out of the box.

Dr Banuri’s agenda as a reformer is extraordinary and unmistakable: improve the quality of teaching and assessment, so that Pakistani university graduates leave the system with skills that make them employable.

To enact reforms, one must always anger people. In higher education, three generations of mediocrity and disability need to be shaken, moved, beaten and taken out, never to be seen again. There is only one way to approach these reforms. With a clear head, and clear eyes. That’s the path Dr Banuri took for nearly two and a half years as chairman of the HEC. The reforms imposed a heavy price on status quo bearers. The old guard fought back. He didn’t want his privileges to be challenged.

The giving of free scholarships is replaced with accuracy. The result is less scholarships. Free grants for centers of excellence that should be replaced with questions about delivery and performance. The result is silence. Lifetime free work is challenged with questions about teaching and publications, and with questions about the quality of those publications. The result was rebellion. The rebellion has succeeded in replacing due process with a pathetic and degrading campaign of slander. Several things can tarnish the good name of world champions like Dr Banuri. But the whole world is watching what Pakistan is doing to its talents: young and old.

He starves his children for a high-quality education, and he punishes parents with slander. In doing so, it values ​​the mediocrity and the meek, and maintains its place as an economically challenged third world country that cannot assemble a single narrative of sustainable and coherent advantage. In any field.

From the production and use of vaccines, to compliance with the international financial system, to the acceptance of hegemonic thugs, to the very low levels of learning from elementary school to university – the roots of Pakistan’s misfortune are its own consequences. The essence of each is The Resistance. Strives steadfastly to keep things as they are.

Years from now, Prime Minister Imran Khan will be remembered for many good things. But he will also be remembered for how he stood with The Resistance. Hold on not to change. Resistance to reform. Resistance to accountability. Tehreek-e-Insaf? Saying the full name of his own party out loud must feel like a cruel joke, even to someone full of faith and confidence like PM Khan. What a shame. Not so much for Dr Banuri, but for the millions of students who were poorer by his departure.

The author is an analyst and commentator.

.



image source

‘The main reason for failing the CSS exam is ignoring the relevant syllabus’ | Instant News


Students interested in taking the Central Superior Services (CSS) exam should focus on their studies and not ignore the importance of preparation, said Prof. Dr. Abdul Hai Madani, professor in NED University’s Department of Humanities.

Speaking at an introductory class organized by Karachi University’s Bureau of Guidance, Counseling & Placement (SGCPB) for those enrolled in the preparation course for the CSS exam, Dr Madani said that one of the main reasons for failing the CSS exam is because students ignore the syllabus and its content. “The majority of applicants believe they can pass the CSS exam because they have recently completed studies or are enrolled in some program, so they only consider the curriculum and material they have studied.” He said that such students for some reason do not attach importance to the CSS syllabus and content, and this is one of the main reasons many students do not complete the CSS exam. He emphasized the need to prepare CSS exams according to the relevant syllabus and content.

CSP (Pakistani Civil Service) officer and Deputy Director of Textile & Leather Division Balqis Jamali said that the biggest reason for failing the CSS exam is a lack of focus on our education system.

“We never thought about how we should dress our children. We blame schools, colleges and universities for not playing their part, but we don’t understand what children want to do, mainly because of a lack of focus. We can’t fix the system ourselves; it requires a collective effort, so everyone has to play their part. “

CSP officer Mir Hussain Ali, who is also a former Karachi and Mirpurkhas commissioner and retired adjunct secretary, said that lack of awareness was also the main reason for low participation in the CSS exam.

“Many people don’t even know what a civil servant is. It’s an easy way to get a job because passing exams makes it easy to get a job, and you can play an important and positive role in serving your country and nation. “

.



image source