Jane Birkin on Serge Gainsbourg, #MeToo and that bag in view of the “Le Symphonique” tour

Written by Oscar Holland, CNN

Contributors Christiane Amanpour, CNN

Chief International of CNN Again Christiane Amanpour interviewed Jane Birkin at home on Tuesday 18 February.

For more than a decade, the relationship between Jane Birkin and her 60s-style icon with Serge Gainsbourg – a young English actress and rebellious French singer almost 20 years older than her – has been the subject of great public appeal. .

As Birkin continues his tour “Le Symphonique”, in which he performs orchestral versions of his ex-partner’s greatest hits, he still expresses fond memories of their first date.

“It made me very happy, seeing that (someone) leaving a boarding school in England with all the mocking of the fact that I had no breasts, saying that I was a” half caste “- half girl, half boy”, he recalled, referring to the her light physique in an interview with CNN’s Christiane Amanpour. “What a pleasure to come to Paris, and for Serge Gainsbourg to say that he has always been afraid of the breast.”

Following what she described as a “truly miserable marriage” to composer John Barry, Birkin remembers being “happy that people thought I was cute and … an object of desire”.

Jane Birkin: Gainsbourg ‘was ahead of its time’

But the relationship between Gainsbourg, who died in 1991, and the London starlet – a successful actress, musician and model in its own right – was more than profound.

Their collaboration was also of creative and musical collaborators. Birkin, now 73, told the story of Gainsbourg’s most famous song “Je T’aime … Moi Non Plus” (“I Love You … Me Neither”). Originally recorded with his former lover, Brigitte Bardot, the song became a hit in the English-speaking world after recording it again with Birkin.

“He was a gentleman, but he just couldn’t resist showing me what he had in his drawer and making me listen to” Je T’aime Moi … Non Plus “, with Bardot, who was incredibly sexy. And so he said:” Do you want to sing it? “And since I was madly in love with him, I said,” Well, sure. “

Gainsbourg and Birkin were pictured during an inauguration at a Paris jeweler.

Gainsbourg and Birkin were pictured during an inauguration at a Paris jeweler. Credit: Images by Stringer / AFP / Getty

“Nobody has ever done better than he did,” he added, reflecting on the cultural impact of Gainsburg. “And probably because he was ahead of his time.”

Of course, for those too young to remember the 13-year-old couple’s romance, or classic films like “Death on the Nile” and “Kaleidoscope”, Birkin’s name will still be familiar, perhaps thanks to the Hermès bag that carries the his name.

The actress told of the now famous accident in which she found herself sitting next to Hermès president, Jean-Louis Dumas, on a flight to London. As the items came out of her large Kelly bag – a previous design of the French luxury house, popularized by Grace Kelly – Birkin suggested a new design.

“I said, ‘Why don’t you make a bag that’s kind of four times the size of the Kelly you could leave open?” he remembered asking Dumas.

“He said, ‘Well, draw it for me.’ And so I drew it on one of those sick bags – the vomit bag on the plane. And it was true to his word, “he said.

Related video: Jane Birkin’s CNN 2017 profile.

Birkin bags are now coveted luxury items that sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars, although the woman behind the idea never received royalties for design. And while her association with the bag means “nothing much” for the actress and singer, she seems not to be convinced that her name has achieved a reputation of its own.

“It was fun to come to New York and they said,” Oh, Birkin – like the bag? “I said,” Yes. Now the bag will sing. “

In a wide-ranging interview aired on CNN International on Friday, Birkin also reflected on the #MeToo movement. He suggested that France, where he has lived for much of the past fifty years, is “usually about 10 years behind England and perhaps 15 years behind America” ​​in an attempt to denounce sexual misconduct.

Birkin on the red carpet at the Cannes Film Festival in 2015.

Birkin on the red carpet at the Cannes Film Festival in 2015. Credit: Loic Venance / AFP / Getty Images

But he pointed to his 17-year-old grandson as an example of how attitudes towards women’s rights and sexual consent are changing.

“The way he was brought up to ask girls what they think, to have their opinion, to do things only if the girl wants – that a whole way of thinking, is not very macho enough, (is) the way the kids have been educated by now, “he said. “I think that’s what will change things … the attitude of young people and the fact that women can feel protected in the workplace.

“Things will never be the same again, and this is a revolution.”

.

image source

Backstage from Tommy Hilfiger’s celebrity shows

Written by Ana Rosado, CNNLondon

For the past five years, American designer Tommy Hilfiger has produced lavish fashion shows and toured them around the world – an unusual approach, when most stylists only participate in a city’s fashion week. His desire to think outside the box is not new. In 1999 he took over the famous Madison Square Garden to present his collection years before Kanye West did the same.

“I am afraid of being irrelevant or stale,” Hilfiger said in an interview in his London office, the day before his spring 2020 fashion show, held in the cavernous Tanks exhibition space in London’s Tate Modern gallery. “I’m always looking for interruptions and discoveries.”

TommyNow autumn-winter 2020 headquarters at Tate Modern.

TommyNow autumn-winter 2020 headquarters at Tate Modern. Credit: Tommy Hilfiger

A profile of Hilfiger could easily be summarized in one sentence: man is synonymous with the colors red, white and blue. Since he founded his company in 1985, he has been one of the designers – along with Ralph Lauren and Gant – who have globalized American preppy aesthetics. Now, with 2,000 stores in 191 countries, it is part of a rare group of designers whose name resonates beyond the fashion industry.

“When I founded Tommy Hilfiger, I thought it would be incredible not only to be an inclusive brand, but a non-exclusive brand,” he said.

Tommy Hilfiger and Destiny's Child.

Tommy Hilfiger and Destiny’s Child. Credit: Getty Images

“I wanted to reach a wider audience and at the time I had no money for advertising,” he added. “But I thought that if I had fantastic musicians who wore clothes, their fans would come to me and want to emulate the stars.”

He dressed Destiny’s Child famously when they had just started, as did Britney Spears, David Bowie and Sheryl Crow. “I was the first to use celebrities in fashion advertising,” he said. “This is before (fashion) magazines used celebrities on their covers.”

Naomi Campbell, Lewis Hamitlon, Tommy Hilfiger and H.E.R. at the TommyNow Fall-Winter 2020 show.

Naomi Campbell, Lewis Hamitlon, Tommy Hilfiger and H.E.R. at the TommyNow Fall-Winter 2020 show. Credit: Tommy Hilfiger

For years Hilfiger has surrounded himself with icons of pop culture, and this season has been no different. After previous collaborations with Gigi Hadid and Zendaya, Hilfiger traveled to London to present a three-way collection with British Formula 1 driver Lewis Hamilton and singer H.E.R.

“I grew up a fan of Tommy,” said Hamilton in an interview in London. “It gave me a platform to express myself … In the world of racing I didn’t feel comfortable in my skin, it’s not a diversified sector.”

Alan Cumming, Billy Porter, H.E.R., Miss Fame, Yolanda Hadid at TommyNow Fall-Winter 2020 fashion show.

Alan Cumming, Billy Porter, H.E.R., Miss Fame, Yolanda Hadid at TommyNow Fall-Winter 2020 fashion show. Credit: Tommy Hilfiger

At the Tate Show the catwalk was flooded with recognizable faces including the models Halima Aden, Luka Sabbat, Winnie Harlow and Naomi Campbell.

“We want to be inclusive, remain relevant and as young as possible,” said Hilfiger.

Hilfiger and Hamilton have already collaborated, but for this, their fourth collection together, they wanted to join the ranks of the brands by pushing forward their sustainability efforts, with over 75% of the collection created using low-impact production processes.

“We always look to the future … so sustainability is a great opportunity for us to do the right thing in society,” said Hilfiger.

Winnie Harlow walks the TommyNow Fall-Winter 2020 show.

Winnie Harlow walks the TommyNow Fall-Winter 2020 show. Credit: Tommy Hilfiger

Over the five years the stylist has brought his shows to fashion weeks around the world, they have become events for 1000 guests and compare them to a “great Broadway musical”.

It’s a bit like putting together a “puzzle”, he said, where you need to orchestrate multiple teams responsible for the timing of all the elements to perfection. “We create a truly unforgettable experience,” he added. “I no longer believe in traditional fashion shows.”

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Interview with Naomi Campbell: “There is always work to be done”

Written by Hala Gorani, CNN

Correspondent and anchor of CNN Hala Gorani he spoke to Naomi Campbell earlier this week. The full interview aired on Hala Gorani tonight on Thursday 20 February.

Before going into what Naomi Campbell has to say, it is impossible to ignore what Naomi Campbell projects: a sort of surreal and cyborg beauty. It’s what I imagine a 3D print of what a perfect otherworldly woman would look like.

At almost 50, the fashion icon and one of the original supermodels of the 90s has lost none of the ambition on which he has built his career for more than thirty years. If anything, it looks more fierce.

We advance into the interview room where we meet, where her entourage buzzes around her; some with lists of talking points, others with makeup brushes for finishing touches. She is decisive. When he sits down and asks a publicist if the button at the top of his shirt is better open or closed, he doesn’t wait for an answer. “Closed,” she says to her own question.

You know exactly what’s best for you.

Naomi Campbell on diversity in fashion

This may be why, although most of her former colleagues have long since retired from the spotlight, she seems busier than ever. He still holds the covers of magazines, walks the catwalks and does photoshoots.

In a sector known for her ageism – and with Naomi Campbell and I who are approaching a sometimes terrifying milestone – I ask her if she believes that age is a problem in her line of work.

“I don’t think about it. I don’t feel it. I do what I have to do,” he says without hesitation. “After being in this business for 34 years, it’s always so surprising to me and I’m always thrilled.”

Naomi Campbell accompanies the Tommy Hilfiger show during London Fashion Week in February 2020.

Naomi Campbell accompanies the Tommy Hilfiger show during London Fashion Week in February 2020. Credit: WWD / Shutterstock

What is one problem, he says, is the lack of representation of black and brown models in a sector that still strongly favors white ideals of beauty. During his career, he fought openly against discrimination and paved the way for racially different models. But he’s not just talking about landing a magazine cover, he points out. The pay disparity worries her even in these days.

“I am now looking at (the models getting) the same payment to do the same job. I feel it is obvious that the next one will come out. And that (it should) be the same.”

Charity work has also become a big goal. The model is currently promoting an upcoming event in Qatar, which will benefit Fashion For Relief, an organization which it founded in 2005 to support the victims of Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana. Fashion For Relief organizes charity shows and high-profile auctions to raise funds for various causes and humanitarian efforts, such as those affected by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan and the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa.

Lately the focus of the foundation has shifted to raising funds for educational programs in Africa, where Campbell says “most of the growing population is under 30 years old. They need that education.”

He cites the disappearance of Nelson Mandela, who defines a “grandfather figure” in 2013 as one of the main motivations for his humanitarian commitments. Eventually he understood, he says, sounding rather emotional, “what he meant” when he talked about helping others.

As he speaks, his empathy is palpable. It is also, in stark contrast to some unflattering representations of his character.

Naomi Campbell responds to tabloid images

In addition to the notorious court case, in which she admitted that she threw a phone to her housekeeper, tabloids have often described her as a diva with unreasonable demands.

But Campbell insists he wants to fight against unfair cover.

When I ask her about the story published last year in the Mail on Sunday, which showed her photos with the entourage of the convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, she angrily replies: “No, no, no”.

“They didn’t publish a photo of me and Jeffrey Epstein because they don’t have one of me and Jeffrey Epstein. They published a photo of me with many people during my 34-year career who might have fallen out of favor and this should reflect on me. ? One of the photos was 30. What does that have to do with me? “

Campbell is careful what she puts on social media. Those platforms are useful for understanding, he says, but he refuses to show his “private life”.

Instead, he rather prefers to focus on the job.

“There is always work to be done,” he says. “You should never sit on your laurels and think, oh, it’s all right.”

She sits very still in the chair: “I still have the push.”

.

image source

Interview with Naomi Campbell: “There is always work to be done”

Written by Hala Gorani, CNN

Correspondent and anchor of CNN Hala Gorani he spoke to Naomi Campbell earlier this week. The full interview aired on Hala Gorani tonight on Thursday 20 February.

Before going into what Naomi Campbell has to say, it is impossible to ignore what Naomi Campbell projects: a sort of surreal and cyborg beauty. It’s what I imagine a 3D print of what a perfect otherworldly woman would look like.

At almost 50, the fashion icon and one of the original supermodels of the 90s has lost none of the ambition on which he has built his career for more than thirty years. If anything, it looks more fierce.

We advance into the interview room where we meet, where her entourage buzzes around her; some with lists of talking points, others with makeup brushes for finishing touches. She is decisive. When he sits down and asks a publicist if the button at the top of his shirt is better open or closed, he doesn’t wait for an answer. “Closed,” she says to her own question.

You know exactly what’s best for you.

Naomi Campbell on diversity in fashion

This may be why, although most of her former colleagues have long since retired from the spotlight, she seems busier than ever. He still holds the covers of magazines, walks the catwalks and does photoshoots.

In a sector known for her ageism – and with Naomi Campbell and I who are approaching a sometimes terrifying milestone – I ask her if she believes that age is a problem in her line of work.

“I don’t think about it. I don’t feel it. I do what I have to do,” he says without hesitation. “After being in this business for 34 years, it’s always so surprising to me and I’m always thrilled.”

Naomi Campbell accompanies the Tommy Hilfiger show during London Fashion Week in February 2020.

Naomi Campbell accompanies the Tommy Hilfiger show during London Fashion Week in February 2020. Credit: WWD / Shutterstock

What is one problem, he says, is the lack of representation of black and brown models in a sector that still strongly favors white ideals of beauty. During his career, he fought openly against discrimination and paved the way for racially different models. But he’s not just talking about landing a magazine cover, he points out. The pay disparity worries her even in these days.

“I am now looking at (the models getting) the same payment to do the same job. I feel it is obvious that the next one will come out. And that (it should) be the same.”

Charity work has also become a big goal. The model is currently promoting an upcoming event in Qatar, which will benefit Fashion For Relief, an organization which it founded in 2005 to support the victims of Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana. Fashion For Relief organizes charity shows and high-profile auctions to raise funds for various causes and humanitarian efforts, such as those affected by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan and the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa.

Lately the focus of the foundation has shifted to raising funds for educational programs in Africa, where Campbell says “most of the growing population is under 30 years old. They need that education.”

He cites the disappearance of Nelson Mandela, who defines a “grandfather figure” in 2013 as one of the main motivations for his humanitarian commitments. Eventually he understood, he says, sounding rather emotional, “what he meant” when he talked about helping others.

As he speaks, his empathy is palpable. It is also, in stark contrast to some unflattering representations of his character.

Naomi Campbell responds to tabloid images

In addition to the notorious court case, in which she admitted that she threw a phone to her housekeeper, tabloids have often described her as a diva with unreasonable demands.

But Campbell insists he wants to fight against unfair cover.

When I ask her about the story published last year in the Mail on Sunday, which showed her photos with the entourage of the convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, she angrily replies: “No, no, no”.

“They didn’t publish a photo of me and Jeffrey Epstein because they don’t have one of me and Jeffrey Epstein. They published a photo of me with many people during my 34-year career who might have fallen out of favor and this should reflect on me. ? One of the photos was 30. What does that have to do with me? “

Campbell is careful what she puts on social media. Those platforms are useful for understanding, he says, but he refuses to show his “private life”.

Instead, he rather prefers to focus on the job.

“There is always work to be done,” he says. “You should never sit on your laurels and think, oh, it’s all right.”

She sits very still in the chair: “I still have the push.”

.

image source

Jane Birkin on Serge Gainsbourg, #MeToo and that bag in view of the “Le Symphonique” tour

Written by Oscar Holland, CNN

Contributors Christiane Amanpour, CNN

Chief International of CNN Again Christiane Amanpour interviewed Jane Birkin at home on Tuesday 18 February.

For more than a decade, the relationship between Jane Birkin and her 60s-style icon with Serge Gainsbourg – a young English actress and rebellious French singer almost 20 years older than her – has been the subject of great public appeal. .

As Birkin continues his tour “Le Symphonique”, in which he performs orchestral versions of his ex-partner’s greatest hits, he still expresses fond memories of their first date.

“It made me very happy, seeing that (someone) leaving a boarding school in England with all the mocking of the fact that I had no breasts, saying that I was a” half caste “- half girl, half boy”, he recalled, referring to the her light physique in an interview with CNN’s Christiane Amanpour. “What a pleasure to come to Paris, and for Serge Gainsbourg to say that he has always been afraid of the breast.”

Following what she described as a “truly miserable marriage” to composer John Barry, Birkin remembers being “happy that people thought I was cute and … an object of desire”.

Jane Birkin: Gainsbourg ‘was ahead of its time’

But the relationship between Gainsbourg, who died in 1991, and the London starlet – a successful actress, musician and model in its own right – was more than profound.

Their collaboration was also of creative and musical collaborators. Birkin, now 73, told the story of Gainsbourg’s most famous song “Je T’aime … Moi Non Plus” (“I Love You … Me Neither”). Originally recorded with his former lover, Brigitte Bardot, the song became a hit in the English-speaking world after recording it again with Birkin.

“He was a gentleman, but he just couldn’t resist showing me what he had in his drawer and making me listen to” Je T’aime Moi … Non Plus “, with Bardot, who was incredibly sexy. And so he said:” Do you want to sing it? “And since I was madly in love with him, I said,” Well, sure. “

Gainsbourg and Birkin were pictured during an inauguration at a Paris jeweler.

Gainsbourg and Birkin were pictured during an inauguration at a Paris jeweler. Credit: Images by Stringer / AFP / Getty

“Nobody has ever done better than he did,” he added, reflecting on the cultural impact of Gainsburg. “And probably because he was ahead of his time.”

Of course, for those too young to remember the 13-year-old couple’s romance, or classic films like “Death on the Nile” and “Kaleidoscope”, Birkin’s name will still be familiar, perhaps thanks to the Hermès bag that carries the his name.

The actress told of the now famous accident in which she found herself sitting next to Hermès president, Jean-Louis Dumas, on a flight to London. As the items came out of her large Kelly bag – a previous design of the French luxury house, popularized by Grace Kelly – Birkin suggested a new design.

“I said, ‘Why don’t you make a bag that’s kind of four times the size of the Kelly you could leave open?” he remembered asking Dumas.

“He said, ‘Well, draw it for me.’ And so I drew it on one of those sick bags – the vomit bag on the plane. And it was true to his word, “he said.

Related video: Jane Birkin’s CNN 2017 profile.

Birkin bags are now coveted luxury items that sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars, although the woman behind the idea never received royalties for design. And while her association with the bag means “nothing much” for the actress and singer, she seems not to be convinced that her name has achieved a reputation of its own.

“It was fun to come to New York and they said,” Oh, Birkin – like the bag? “I said,” Yes. Now the bag will sing. “

In a wide-ranging interview aired on CNN International on Friday, Birkin also reflected on the #MeToo movement. He suggested that France, where he has lived for much of the past fifty years, is “usually about 10 years behind England and perhaps 15 years behind America” ​​in an attempt to denounce sexual misconduct.

Birkin on the red carpet at the Cannes Film Festival in 2015.

Birkin on the red carpet at the Cannes Film Festival in 2015. Credit: Loic Venance / AFP / Getty Images

But he pointed to his 17-year-old grandson as an example of how attitudes towards women’s rights and sexual consent are changing.

“The way he was brought up to ask girls what they think, to have their opinion, to do things only if the girl wants – that a whole way of thinking, is not very macho enough, (is) the way the kids have been educated by now, “he said. “I think that’s what will change things … the attitude of young people and the fact that women can feel protected in the workplace.

“Things will never be the same again, and this is a revolution.”

.

image source

Interview with Naomi Campbell: “There is always work to be done”

Written by Hala Gorani, CNN

Correspondent and anchor of CNN Hala Gorani he spoke to Naomi Campbell earlier this week. The full interview aired on Hala Gorani tonight on Thursday 20 February.

Before going into what Naomi Campbell has to say, it is impossible to ignore what Naomi Campbell projects: a sort of surreal and cyborg beauty. It’s what I imagine a 3D print of what a perfect otherworldly woman would look like.

At almost 50, the fashion icon and one of the original supermodels of the 90s has lost none of the ambition on which he has built his career for more than thirty years. If anything, it looks more fierce.

We advance into the interview room where we meet, where her entourage buzzes around her; some with lists of talking points, others with makeup brushes for finishing touches. She is decisive. When he sits down and asks a publicist if the button at the top of his shirt is better open or closed, he doesn’t wait for an answer. “Closed,” she says to her own question.

You know exactly what’s best for you.

Naomi Campbell on diversity in fashion

This may be why, although most of her former colleagues have long since retired from the spotlight, she seems busier than ever. He still holds the covers of magazines, walks the catwalks and does photoshoots.

In a sector known for her ageism – and with Naomi Campbell and I who are approaching a sometimes terrifying milestone – I ask her if she believes that age is a problem in her line of work.

“I don’t think about it. I don’t feel it. I do what I have to do,” he says without hesitation. “After being in this business for 34 years, it’s always so surprising to me and I’m always thrilled.”

Naomi Campbell accompanies the Tommy Hilfiger show during London Fashion Week in February 2020.

Naomi Campbell accompanies the Tommy Hilfiger show during London Fashion Week in February 2020. Credit: WWD / Shutterstock

What is one problem, he says, is the lack of representation of black and brown models in a sector that still strongly favors white ideals of beauty. During his career, he fought openly against discrimination and paved the way for racially different models. But he’s not just talking about landing a magazine cover, he points out. The pay disparity worries her even in these days.

“I am now looking at (the models getting) the same payment to do the same job. I feel it is obvious that the next one will come out. And that (it should) be the same.”

Charity work has also become a big goal. The model is currently promoting an upcoming event in Qatar, which will benefit Fashion For Relief, an organization which it founded in 2005 to support the victims of Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana. Fashion For Relief organizes charity shows and high-profile auctions to raise funds for various causes and humanitarian efforts, such as those affected by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan and the outbreak of Ebola in West Africa.

Lately the focus of the foundation has shifted to raising funds for educational programs in Africa, where Campbell says “most of the growing population is under 30 years old. They need that education.”

He cites the disappearance of Nelson Mandela, who defines a “grandfather figure” in 2013 as one of the main motivations for his humanitarian commitments. Eventually he understood, he says, sounding rather emotional, “what he meant” when he talked about helping others.

As he speaks, his empathy is palpable. It is also, in stark contrast to some unflattering representations of his character.

Naomi Campbell responds to tabloid images

In addition to the notorious court case, in which she admitted that she threw a phone to her housekeeper, tabloids have often described her as a diva with unreasonable demands.

But Campbell insists he wants to fight against unfair cover.

When I ask her about the story published last year in the Mail on Sunday, which showed her photos with the entourage of the convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein, she angrily replies: “No, no, no”.

“They didn’t publish a photo of me and Jeffrey Epstein because they don’t have one of me and Jeffrey Epstein. They published a photo of me with many people during my 34-year career who might have fallen out of favor and this should reflect on me. ? One of the photos was 30. What does that have to do with me? “

Campbell is careful what she puts on social media. Those platforms are useful for understanding, he says, but he refuses to show his “private life”.

Instead, he rather prefers to focus on the job.

“There is always work to be done,” he says. “You should never sit on your laurels and think, oh, it’s all right.”

She sits very still in the chair: “I still have the push.”

.

image source