Tag Archives: Finland

Don’t You Dare Speed ​​Through Swiss in a Ferrari Testarossa | Instant News


Photographer: Fabrice Coffrini / AFP / Getty Images

Meaningless traffic fines for a multi-millionaire could cripple someone living on the sidelines. Along with processing fees and penalties for late payment, one fine can bankrupt a family. National Crime Victims Center estimated in 2011 that Americans owed more than $ 50 billion to the criminal justice system. That Washington Post estimated in 2018 that more than 7 million Americans may have lost their driver’s license due to unpaid court or administrative debt.

The solution is clear: Calibrate fines according to the ability to pay offenders. That’s the conclusion of a article by Jean-Pierre Dubé, a marketing professor at the University of Chicago’s Booth Business School, in the spring issue Chicago Stan Review.

“Imposing the same fine on everyone is regressive,” Dubé wrote. “The personalized fines can be low enough for people to pay, but high enough to be a barrier to even the more affluent citizens.”

The Swiss canton of Sts. Gallen made headlines in 2010 when a court fined a man 299,000 Swiss francs (later around $ 290,000) who had driven his Ferrari Testarossa at speeds of up to 137 kilometers per hour (about 85 mph) on roads set at speeds of 80 kilometers per hour. He can afford it: the villa has a garage with five luxury cars. Finland is another country that bases fines on income, according to Dubé.

A captive government doesn’t just try to prevent abuses; they try to raise money. With his marketing cap, Dubé said the government could make more money by setting fines based on ability to pay, just as cinemas vary ticket prices by age. He said he’s working with a company, Servus, which uses artificial intelligence to create payment options for individuals. “The goal is to help raise as much as possible for cities, health care facilities or utilities while keeping payments manageable,” he wrote. “We need a city to agree on this idea, and research can begin.”

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German submarines equipped with Russian technology: report | News | DW | Instant News


A navigation system of Russian origin called the Navi-Sailor 4100 has been installed on at least 100 ships operated by the German military, the Bundestag, including submarines, since 2005, according to the mass market newspaper. Photo on Sunday.

The navigation device was developed by Transas, a company founded in St. Petersburg. Petersburg in 1990. Even though it was bought in 2018 by Finnish company, Wärtsilä, the defense division remains in Russian hands.

That picture The report claims that the system’s data encryption does not comply with military security standards, in apparent reference to NATO, of which Germany is a member.

“During the worst case cyber attack, navigation data could be hacked and the ship could completely lose operability,” picture quoted an unnamed officer as saying. The report also pointed out that Russia has occasionally conducted naval maneuvers near the German Baltic Sea coastline.

Widely used on civilian ships, the Navi-Sailor system was installed on about 100 German naval vessels in 2005, during the Chancellery of Social Democrats Gerhard Schröder, picture report. He currently serves as chairman of the board of directors from the Russian company Gazprom’s Nord Stream 2 Baltic Sea pipeline project.

The next government, picture reports, also decided to install navigation systems on two German submarines: U35 and U36, launched in 2015 and 2016, respectively.

This German-made 212A class submarine, billed as highly maneuverable and quiet and elusive for extended periods of time underwater, uses a mixture of hydrogen, diesel cells and battery propulsion and is equipped with six torpedo tubes.

The Transas device is vulnerable?

picture reported that his question to the German Ministry of Defense (BMVg) about whether the Transas system was vulnerable to hacking led to the answer that “the government is making great efforts to ensure the security of IT, cyberspace and crypto media in the operational area of ​​BMVg.”

The Wärtsilä website says the Transas subsidiary provides 35% of the electronic graphics systems used by the world’s shipping and ports, and 45% of the world’s simulation equipment, typically used for training.

“Onboard marine equipment & data services are used on more than 13,000 commercial vessels and patrol vessels of the Navy and Coast Guard from more than 100 countries,” according to Wärtsilä.

Explanation of the Green Party’s request

Tobias Lindner, the Bundestag’s top representative for the opposition Green Party on Germany’s parliamentary defense committee, voiced concerns that followed picturethe report.

“The Bundeswehr must ensure that naval navigation software does not represent a security leak. The ministry should immediately explain why software from manufacturers in NATO countries is not being used,” Lindner said.

Norway blocks sales to Russian companies

On similar technological sensitivity issues, on Tuesday the government of NATO member Norway blocked the sale of Rolls-Royce’s Norwegian branch, Bergen Engines, to Russia’s TMH Group.

Such machines and technology would be of “great military importance to Russia” but would be “clearly at odds with the best interests of Norwegian and allied security policies,” according to the government.

Norwegian Public Security Minister Monica Maeland described the move as “absolutely necessary”, saying security cooperation with Russia was non-existent.

TMH Group is a private company headquartered in Russia that produces locomotives and rail equipment.

ipj / nm (AFP, Reuters)

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Anti-lockdown protests break out in Europe amid a new wave of COVID | European News | Instant News


Protesters in Germany clashed with police on Saturday over the coronavirus action, with officers using water cannons, pepper spray and batons against people trying to break through police barriers.

Protests against government action to control the pandemic were also reported in several other countries in Europe, including Austria, Britain, Finland, Romania and Switzerland.

More than 20,000 people participated in the protests in the central German city of Kassel, despite a court ban, where there were also confrontations between demonstrators and counter-protesters.

Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Friday that Germany must implement an “emergency brake” and reverse some of the recent easing of restrictions as coronavirus infections accelerate.

Germany’s national center for disease control said new infections were growing exponentially as the more infectious variant of COVID-19 first detected in Britain became dominant in the country.

On Saturday, the Robert Koch Institute reported 16,033 new cases and recorded an additional 207 deaths, bringing the overall death toll to 74,565 in Germany.

But protesters say actions such as the closure of non-essential shops, hotels, restaurants and fitness centers are a threat to their freedom.

In London, demonstrators who defied the UK lockdown for months opposed police warning of possible fines and arrests for violating a ban on group gatherings.

In Finland, police estimate that around 400 people, without masks, gathered together in the capital Helsinki to protest government-imposed restrictions on COVID-19.

In Austria, around 1,000 protesters participated in a demonstration against the government’s viral actions near Vienna’s central train station.

In Switzerland, more than 5,000 protesters met for a quiet march in the Liestal community 15 km (9 miles) southeast of the city of Basel, local media reported.

More than 1,000 anti-vaccination protesters took to the streets in the Romanian capital, Bucharest, amid a spike in COVID-19 infections there.

The largely unmasked crowd honked, waved national flags and chanted messages such as “Block vaccinations,” and “Freedom.” One plaque reads: “Parents, protect your children! Stop fear! “

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Germany: Police Clash With Protesters Against Virus Action | Instant News


Photographer: Thomas Lohnes / Getty Images

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Berlin (AP) – Protesters in Germany clashed with police on Saturday over the coronavirus action, with officers using water cannons, pepper spray and batons against people trying to break through police barriers, the German news agency dpa reported.

Protests against government action to control the pandemic were also reported in several other European countries, including Austria, Switzerland and Finland.

About 10,000 people participated in the protests in the central German city of Kassel, where there were also confrontations between demonstrators and counter-protesters.

Thousands of people marched through downtown Kassel despite the court ban, and most did not adhere to infection control protocols such as wearing face masks. Several protesters attacked several journalists, said dpa.

Federal police, previously brought in from other parts of Germany, used water cannons and helicopters to control the crowd, the news agency reported.

Police said several people were detained, but did not give their numbers.

Various groups, most of them opponents of far-right government regulations to fight the pandemic, have called for Saturday protests in cities across the country.

Viral infections have risen again in Germany in recent weeks and the government will decide next week on how to respond.

Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Friday that Germany must implement an “emergency brake” and reverse some of the recent easing of restrictions as coronavirus infections accelerate.

Germany’s national center for disease control said new infections were growing exponentially as the more infectious variant of COVID-19 first detected in Britain became dominant in the country.

On Saturday, the Robert Koch Institute reported 16,033 new cases and recorded an additional 207 deaths, bringing the overall death toll to 74,565 in Germany.

In Berlin, some 1,800 police officers were on alert for possible rioting, but only about 500 protesters gathered at the Brandenburg Gate, a landmark for the city. Meanwhile, about 1,000 residents gathered on Berlin’s Unter den Linden highway to protest the far-right demonstrations.

Police had to step in when some right-wing protesters tried to attack the press photographer, but in general, a police spokesman told dpa, “not much is happening here.”

Prior to the Berlin protests, authorities had announced that they would create three special areas protected by police where journalists could withdraw when attacked by protesters, dpa reported. As in other countries, journalists are increasingly being targeted during far-right demonstrations in Germany.

Protesters also took to the streets in other cities across Europe.

In Finland, police estimate that around 400 people are without masks and gathered together in the capital, Helsinki, to protest government-imposed restrictions on COVID-19. Smaller demonstrations are scheduled in other Finnish cities.

Before the Helsinki rally, about 300 people chanted slogans such as “Let the people speak!” and carrying placards with phrases such as “Facts and figures do not add up” lined the city streets, ending at the Parliament building.

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police clashes with protesters against the viral action | Instant News


BERLIN (AP) – Protesters in Germany clashed with police on Saturday over the coronavirus action, with officers using water cannons, pepper spray and batons against people trying to break through police barriers, the German news agency dpa reported.

Protests against government action to control the pandemic were also reported in several other European countries, including Austria, Switzerland and Finland.

About 10,000 people participated in the protests in the central German city of Kassel, where there were also confrontations between demonstrators and counter-protesters.

Thousands of people marched through downtown Kassel despite the court ban, and most did not adhere to infection control protocols such as wearing face masks. Several protesters attacked several journalists, said dpa.

Federal police, previously brought in from other parts of Germany, used water cannons and helicopters to control the crowd, the news agency reported.

Police said several people were detained, but did not give their numbers.

Various groups, most of them opponents of far-right government regulations to fight the pandemic, have called for Saturday protests in cities across the country.

Viral infections have risen again in Germany in recent weeks and the government will decide next week on how to respond.

Chancellor Angela Merkel said on Friday that Germany must implement an “emergency brake” and reverse some of the recent easing of restrictions as coronavirus infections accelerate.

Germany’s national center for disease control said new infections were growing exponentially as the more infectious variant of COVID-19 first detected in Britain became dominant in the country.

On Saturday, the Robert Koch Institute reported 16,033 new cases and recorded an additional 207 deaths, bringing the overall death toll to 74,565 in Germany.

In Berlin, some 1,800 police officers were on alert for possible rioting, but only about 500 protesters gathered at the Brandenburg Gate, a landmark for the city. Meanwhile, about 1,000 residents gathered on Berlin’s Unter den Linden highway to protest the far-right demonstrations.

Police had to step in when some right-wing protesters tried to attack the press photographer, but in general, a police spokesman told dpa, “not much is happening here.”

Prior to the Berlin protests, authorities had announced that they would create three special areas protected by police where journalists could withdraw when attacked by protesters, dpa reported. As in other countries, journalists are increasingly being targeted during far-right demonstrations in Germany.

Protesters also took to the streets in other cities across Europe.

In Finland, police estimate that around 400 people are without masks and gathered together in the capital, Helsinki, to protest government-imposed restrictions on COVID-19. Smaller demonstrations are scheduled in other Finnish cities.

Before the Helsinki rally, about 300 people chanted slogans such as “Let the people speak!” and carrying placards with phrases such as “Facts and figures do not add up” lined the city streets, ending at the Parliament building.

The Helsinki police tweeted that the registered march and rally was peaceful but violated Finland’s current social distancing requirements and restrictions at public gatherings. Officers negotiate with event organizers to try to break up the event.

An Associated Press reporter monitoring the action noted members of the pan-Nordic right-wing group Soldier Odin attending the demonstration.

In Austria, around 1,000 protesters participated in a demonstration against the government’s viral actions near Vienna’s central train station. Police reprimanded several of the protesters who were not wearing masks and who were too close, the APA news agency reported.

In Switzerland, more than 5,000 protesters met for a silent march in the Liestal community 15 kilometers southeast of the city of Basel, local media reported. Most wore no masks and some held up banners with slogans such as “Vaccination kills.”

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Jari Tanner contributed reporting from Helsinki, Finland.

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