Tag Archives: Games

The Staples Center releases a new fan guide for the Lakers, Clippers, Kings – Press Telegram games | Instant News


It has been 13 months since the Staples Center hall filled with spectators. While the Staples Center will again host on Thursday night for some 2,000 fans, it won’t open as many doors as it will break them.

What was once the busiest place in LA announced its procedures for getting busy again, starting with the Lakers playing the Celtics: Among the many procedures, the most pressing is for all spectators to be fully vaccinated according to CDC guidelines or provide evidence of a COVID-19 test negative within the previous 72 hours.

It will be a challenge for many fans, said Danielle Snyder, vice president of guest services and security at the Staples Center. But in the “short time” before stadiums can operate at full capacity, there will be a number of precautions to help protect fans and prevent the spread of COVID-19 at the largest indoor mass gathering in Los Angeles since the pandemic began.

“We have a loyal fan base of people who love to come see their home team, we feel like we’re part of the culture with all the events we have here, and that people are used to having certain experiences,” said Snyder. “But we know we need to have a safe experience for everyone to have fun in the game, and yes, we have to do all these things to make sure.”

For those who can attend home games for the Lakers, Clippers or Kings, the first thing they will notice is that the Staples Center borders have extended beyond its physical walls. Staff will meet participants at locations around the fence around the arena to check health verification and photo identities. The test will not be available onsite, so it must be done in advance. Tickets will only be accepted on mobile devices. Wallets or bags are not allowed in; wallet only.

Once inside the fenced area, guests will be asked to wear face covers for their nose and mouth during the game (except in the designated outdoor dining area). Neck protectors and bandanas will not be accepted; face shield can only be worn with a mask.

While Staples are technically allowed to fill up to 35 percent capacity, realistically with other guidelines set by state and county health officials – particularly those requiring social distancing between spectators – even 35 percent of the capacity of the Staples Center’s 19,000 seats is practically unfit. But there’s a good chance more fans will be welcomed as the season progresses, more people get vaccinated and health standards gradually soften.

“We waited with bated breath,” said Snyder, “just like everyone else.”

The hands-on experience will differ in several dramatic ways: No cash will be received at the Staples Center. While several concourse food options will be open, there will be no food or drink in the bowl arena; all diners must go out to eat. The group of fans sitting together must be from the same house. Hand sanitizer stations will be available all over the place, and hand washing is recommended.

There are also some unseen changes: The Staples Center is one of the first large indoor venues to receive the GBAC Star certification, a reflection of its updated air filtration system and thorough cleaning procedures that were implemented months before the doors opened again for sporting events.

“It’s something we’ve been working on for a long time, and then hastily the last few weeks when we received the guidelines,” said Snyder. “We still hope the fans will have the same experience in our matches.”

Frank Vogel pays tribute to former Laker ‘Slick’ Leonard

The longest basketball career weaves a complex network that touches all areas and generations of games. Bob “Slick” Leonard’s career was like that: He was an NCAA champion in Indiana in 1953; he played for the Minneapolis and Los Angeles Lakers; he is the Indiana Pacers’ most winning head coach of all time, guiding them to three ABA championships; he later carved out his name as an announcer, known by his trademark “Boom, Baby!”

For the Lakers coach, Frank Vogel, he is a friend who is most remembered.

After Leonard died on Tuesday morning at 88, Vogel – who finished second behind Leonard in the Pacers’ all-time coaching triumph – took the minutes before Tuesday’s game to remember Leonard, whom he cherished with “incredible friendship and support” over the years. -year. He said he consulted regularly with Leonard for his thoughts on his team, even since taking over as Lakers coach.





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Schools Out of Quarantine Quickly Make Up for Lost Time, Game | Instant News


PEORIA, Ill. (WMBD / WYZZ-TV) – When the Elmwood-Brimfield soccer team was put into quarantine last month, a shortened six-week season got shorter for the Trojans.

The first thought was ‘Why us?’ Why not later, after the season, “said senior EB Brendan Stevens. “Or before that so you don’t have to worry about that.”

If someone in a high school sports program tests positive for COVID-19, the team must be quarantined without training or games for two weeks. The Trojans have only missed one game and have been back on the pitch for two.

The Farmington football team returns from a two-week COVID-19 hiatus on Friday evening. Several weeks of emotions flowed through as the Farmers won their first match back on the pitch after being out for 14 days.

“I know the whole team is excited, excited to play. Trying to put in as many games as possible, “said Farmington senior Dridyn Lewis. “Being a senior, it hit me, I won’t have (football) after this.”

At Limestone, the volleyball team returned from a two-week break on Saturday. The Rockets lost a two-set match to Metamora but the players were delighted to be back on the pitch.

“Even though we lost it was still great to play with the team and everything,” said Limestone sophomore Alayna Rudebeck.

Limestone’s first practice in 14 days took place the night before Saturday’s game. Now the team will play eight games in the next two weeks to make up for the postponed competition.

“I am one of the people who cannot leave their room because of COVID,” said Limestone senior Jadyn Swan. “So I’m really excited to get back into it.”

This is the last week of the men’s football season. Next week the women’s football and volleyball season will end.

The quarantine area team now makes up for the lost time. And enjoy every second.

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The Staples Center releases a new fan guide for the Lakers, Clippers, Kings games – Daily News | Instant News


It has been 13 months since the Staples Center hall filled with spectators. While the Staples Center will again host on Thursday night for some 2,000 fans, it won’t open as many doors as it will break them.

What was once the busiest place in LA announced its procedures for getting busy again, starting with the Lakers playing the Celtics: Among the many procedures, the most pressing is for all spectators to be fully vaccinated according to CDC guidelines or provide evidence of a COVID-19 test negative within the previous 72 hours.

It will be a challenge for many fans, said Danielle Snyder, vice president of guest services and security at the Staples Center. But in the “short time” before stadiums can operate at full capacity, there will be a number of precautions to help protect fans and prevent the spread of COVID-19 at the largest indoor mass gathering in Los Angeles since the pandemic began.

“We have a loyal fan base of people who love to come see their home team, we feel like we’re part of the culture with all the events we have here, and that people are used to having certain experiences,” said Snyder. “But we know we need to have a safe experience for everyone to have fun in the game, and yes, we have to do all these things to make sure.”

For those who can attend home games for the Lakers, Clippers or Kings, the first thing they will notice is that the Staples Center borders have extended beyond its physical walls. Staff will meet participants at locations around the fence around the arena to check health verification and photo identities. The test will not be available onsite, so it must be done in advance. Tickets will only be accepted on mobile devices. Wallets or bags are not allowed in; wallet only.

Once inside the fenced area, guests will be asked to wear face covers for their nose and mouth during the game (except in the designated outdoor dining area). Neck protectors and bandanas will not be accepted; face shield can only be worn with a mask.

While Staples are technically allowed to fill up to 35 percent capacity, realistically with other guidelines set by state and county health officials – particularly those requiring social distancing between spectators – even 35 percent of the capacity of the Staples Center’s 19,000 seats is practically unfit. But there’s a good chance more fans will be welcomed as the season progresses, more people get vaccinated and health standards gradually soften.

“We waited with bated breath,” said Snyder, “just like everyone else.”

The hands-on experience will differ in several dramatic ways: No cash will be received at the Staples Center. While several concourse food options will be open, there will be no food or drink in the bowl arena; all diners must go out to eat. The group of fans sitting together must be from the same house. Hand sanitizer stations will be available all over the place, and hand washing is recommended.

There are also some unseen changes: The Staples Center is one of the first large indoor venues to receive the GBAC Star certification, a reflection of its updated air filtration system and thorough cleaning procedures that were implemented months before the doors opened again for sporting events.

“It’s something we’ve been working on for a long time, and then hastily the last few weeks when we received the guidelines,” said Snyder. “We still hope the fans will have the same experience in our matches.”

Frank Vogel pays tribute to former Laker ‘Slick’ Leonard

The longest basketball career weaves a complex network that touches all areas and generations of games. Bob “Slick” Leonard’s career was like that: He was an NCAA champion in Indiana in 1953; he played for the Minneapolis and Los Angeles Lakers; he is the Indiana Pacers’ most winning head coach of all time, guiding them to three ABA championships; he later carved out his name as an announcer, known by his trademark “Boom, Baby!”

For the Lakers coach, Frank Vogel, he is a friend who is most remembered.

After Leonard died on Tuesday morning at 88, Vogel – who finished second behind Leonard in the Pacers’ all-time coaching triumph – took the minutes before Tuesday’s game to remember Leonard, whom he cherished with “incredible friendship and support” over the years. -year. He said he consulted regularly with Leonard for his thoughts on his team, even since taking over as Lakers coach.





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To the editor: Violent games create a violent world | Instant News


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‘Outriders’ battling the symptoms of modern gaming discourse | Style | Instant News


It is necessary to have a conversation that sets consumer expectations versus the expectations of publishers and developers.

Unfinished game releases have become more prevalent than expected over the past 15 years of the video game industry. Since the Xbox 360 was launched in 2005 – and established that online connectivity is not just a major aspect of a title, but is frankly a requirement for basic functionality – game development has gone from making sure the best games are delivered at launch to getting out the door by a certain deadline and patch it up later. Sometimes this new philosophy works, and games that will be forever compromised before the patch age posted online can now be salvaged, and sometimes lead to lame experiences that sometimes take months to fix.

We’ve seen this issue crop up time and time again over the last two generations of consoles. Recently, “Cyberpunk 2077,” the most popular game in recent memory, was released in such a technically dire state that it was pulled from the PlayStation Network Store, and still hasn’t returned four months later, despite two major patches.

Then there are games like “Outriders”. Bulletstorm’s developer, People Can Fly, partnered with publisher Square-Enix to develop and launch a co-op RPG loot shooter that’s always online. If that genre sounds like a bribe, thanks to Bungie Studios and “Destiny” for blessing the industry with this new gaming niche. “Outriders” has everything going for it – impressive graphics, great technical performance and fun and addictive gameplay. It’s also barely playable in its current state due to a series of connectivity issues preventing most players from even joining the game. Those who actually met the full lag experience have now been known to delete entire storage files, which are stored on the server side and not locally on the system storage device. Players have reported losing as much as 50 hours of progress, as loot – the entire objective of loot-based games – disappears from their inventory.

According to the developer, the source of the booty removal action has been traced back to a rushed patch released shortly after the launch in an attempt to curb connectivity issues. An accidental side effect of the patch is that the patch now erases random user inventory when the game crashes. His recovery is now worse than his previous symptoms, and that’s because People Can Fly is under tremendous pressure to release a patch for a game that has only been on the market for less than a week. The developer didn’t have the resources or time to fully test the patch before it went live, and this is what happened.

Soon, pitchforks have come out, and the usual suspects, including professional Internet troll Jim Sterling, are already stabbing People Can Fly for releasing the game in this state, and for rushing out of the patch causing this problem. This comment is as tonedeaf as one can imagine, considering that People Can Fly is based in Poland, a country that has been hard hit by Covid. What well-known – or well-known – developers are also based in Poland? CD Projekt Red, developer of “Cyberpunk 2077.”

As much as gaming enthusiasts would prefer not to admit it, the pandemic has taken a sledgehammer for development schedules, pushing many games backwards by as much as a year or so. While Hollywood’s notorious delays, such as “Black Widow” and “No Time to Die” get all the media attention every time the studio postpones a release date, the video game industry flies under the radar with delays because it is much more closed off. until it’s closer to launch. So from the outside, it looks like the industry is doing just fine. That’s definitely not the case.

That doesn’t completely let People Can Fly get away with releasing an online based game with so many connectivity issues. But not a single one of these “Fate” cloning experiences has yet to be launched in a perfect state. Even “Destiny” had major connectivity issues in the days following launch. The obvious fact is that Internet-based games will run into problems when the server is hit with multiple players for the first time – especially developers who have never made a game like that before.

The problem with People Can Fly created a rush for fixing which ended up causing more problems. But it’s impossible to blame the developer when social media and message boards are filled with constant rant aimed not only at the game and the development team as a whole, but also individual members and their families. People Can Fly is just trying to get something out as quickly as possible, and not realizing the negative effects. Now the harsh words had escalated, and the problem was even worse.

Nobody wants to face the fact that they paid $ 60 for a game that didn’t work properly when it launched. That is understandable. But the video game industry, unlike nearly any other industry, is so based on first-day sales and a generation of hype that it’s hard for many to just sit and wait – especially in a pandemic. Fans need to take a deep breath, and have the patience for People Can Fly – and other developers in the exact same scenario – to develop, properly test, and release patches to fix problems as they arise, or just wait to buy the game at a later date. day. It’s frustrating, but that is the global situation we are in until Covid has been resolved. Games won’t have the polish we are used to, and that’s fine. I think we can all agree that we’d rather games take a little longer to release, or to patch, than put a developer’s life in danger for a hobby.

Josh Rouse lives in Lawton and writes the weekly play column for The Lawton Constitution.

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