Tag Archives: Good

Police make arrests following Goldie’s art robbery in Waikato, paintings valued at ‘over $ 1 million’ | Instant News


Sleep ’tis a Gentle Thing by New Zealand artist Charles Frederick Goldie was stolen along with many other unique works of art and antiques. Photo / NZ Police

Three people have been arrested in connection with an art robbery that included a Goldie painting estimated to be worth more than $ 1 million.

Waikato police last week reported a robbery of antiquities in Hamilton East that included paintings titled Sleep ’tis a Gentle Thing, by Ngāti Maru and chief Ngāti Paoa Hori Pokai, by New Zealand artist Charles Frederick Goldie.

Police believe it took place in the Hamilton East area between December 27 and January 3.

On Monday, police revealed that they had issued a search warrant at Hamilton’s address on Saturday and found stolen property.

Two of the men, aged 45 and 49, appeared in Hamilton District Court today, jointly charged with robbery.

They were both given temporary name suppression, one was given bail while the other was detained until he could find a suitable place to live.

The man on bail has filed a plea of ​​innocence and will now appear in court again in March.

The 49-year-old defendant was held without defense until February 2, but his lawyers indicated that bail applications were likely to be made before that date.

The third defendant will appear after the postponement of lunch today.

Meanwhile, Goldie’s painting has not been found.

“The police are seeking public assistance with any information that could lead to the restoration of this painting,” said a police media release.

“If you have information, please call the Police on 105 and excerpt file 210103/2961.

“Alternatively, you can call Crime Stoppers on 0800 555 111.”

Goldie’s most expensive piece, A Noble Relic of a Noble Race, from chief Ngāti Manawa Wharekauri Tahuna, sold for $ 1,337,687 at an International Arts Center auction in Auckland in 2016.

Director Richard Thomson said he sold another version of the stolen painting in 2008 for a record price of $ 454,000.

“So it’s a multi-million dollar piece of art on the market today. I’ve sold dozens of Goldies, and it’s a really good example of his work, has all the advantages.

“I’m quite annoyed [the burglary]. This is a very important national treasure. The owner is the keeper, but the country owns it, really. “

The stolen painting was likely created between 1933 and 1938, when Goldie was in his sixties.

While Goldie’s previous work tends to fetch the highest price, Thomson says the 2016 record was set in 1941.

Despite his high ratings, Thomson said he thought it would be “worthless” in the hands of the thief.

“There is absolutely no market for it now in the wrong hands. It’s a stupid thing to do and all they’ll get is bad karma.

“My advice is to come back as quickly and safely as possible.”

.



image source

Goldie’s painting stolen during the Waikato heist was worth ‘over $ 1 million’ | Instant News


New Zealand artist CF Goldie’s Sleep ’tis a Gentle Thing’ was stolen along with many other unique works of art and antiques. Photo / NZ Police

A major seller of Goldie’s paintings in the country said a piece depicting a late Māori rangatira reportedly stolen today would be worth more than a million dollars.

The Waikato police are looking for information regarding the robbery, including a painting titled Sleep ’tis a Gentle Thing, by Ngāti Maru and chief Ngāti Paoa Hori Pokai, by New Zealand artist Charles Frederick Goldie.

Police believe it occurred in the Hamilton East area between 27 December 2020 and 3 January 2021.

Other artwork and antiques were stolen, including Koch & Bergfeld’s tableware.

Goldie’s most expensive piece, A Noble Relic of a Noble Race, from chief Ngāti Manawa Wharekauri Tahuna, sold for $ 1,337,687 at an International Arts Center auction in Auckland in 2016.

Director Richard Thomson said he sold another version of the stolen painting in 2008 for a record price of $ 454,000.

“So that’s a million dollars plus artwork that’s on the market today. I’ve sold dozens of Goldies, and it’s a really good example of his work, it has all the advantages.

“I’m quite annoyed [the burglary]. This is a very important national treasure. The owner is the keeper, but the country owns it, really. “

The stolen painting was most likely done between 1933 and 1938, when Goldie was in his sixties.

While Goldie’s previous work tends to fetch the highest price, Thomson says the 2016 record was set in 1941.

Despite his high ratings, Thomson said he thought it would be “worthless” in the hands of the thief.

“There is absolutely no market for it now in the wrong hands. It’s a stupid thing to do and all they’ll get is bad karma.

“My advice is to come back as quickly and safely as possible.”

Webb auction house art chief Charles Ninow said another version of the painting was sold, at a different auction house, in 2012 for $ 280,000.

He believes in today’s market it will be worth “easily over $ 500,000”.

“I remember selling it at a higher than average price, but the market has since been wild for Goldie. His art is just one of those things whose value goes up every year.”

New Zealand artist CF Goldie's Sleep 'tis a Gentle Thing' was stolen along with many other unique works of art and antiques.  Photo / NZ Police
New Zealand artist CF Goldie’s Sleep ’tis a Gentle Thing’ was stolen along with many other unique works of art and antiques. Photo / NZ Police

Ninow said he thought it would be rated a little lower than the previous work because of Goldie’s age at the time.

“When he was younger in his career he was in a better mental state, and did this very detailed painting. As they get older they become a little more poetic, looser, and that can affect grades.”

Having such a painting stolen would be of great concern not only to the owner, but also to Māori, who regarded the depiction of tūpuna, the ancestor, as “embodying vairua, soul, nurturer”.

“So, stealing it and not knowing it exists is a huge loss for Aotearoa, for our culture and our nation.”

The painting is entitled "The Woman in the Red Hat" also stolen from Hamilton's address.  Photo / NZ Police
A painting entitled “Lady With Red Hat” was also stolen from Hamilton’s address. Photo / NZ Police

Ninow said the thieves likely knew what they were doing.

“His works were instantly recognizable, he was very famous, like Colin McCahon. Everyone knows them, and very much sought after. If you’ve seen him in person, it’s very different to you.”

But Ninow believes that it is “impossible” to sell underground.

“The New Zealand art market is bigger than most people think, but it’s still small, and unlikely to be sold through traditional channels. Once it is known that a work has dubious origins, no one will touch it.

“With the stolen works, we often never know what happened to them. They move through these underground channels and we never see them again, but I really hope that doesn’t happen and we can see them again.”

Another painting was stolen.  Photo / NZ Police
Another painting was stolen. Photo / NZ Police

The police asked members of the public for information or possible sightings of the stolen items.

“This is definitely a very special legacy and we want to return it to its owner as quickly as possible,” said Constable Ben Monk of Hamilton’s Tactical Crime Unit.

“If you have information, please call the police on 105 and excerpt file 210103/2961.

“Alternatively, you can call Crime Stoppers on 0800 555 111.”

.



image source

Viral-fighting antibodies persist in New Zealand’s Covid-19 patients | Instant News


Viral-fighting antibodies have been found in Kiwi Covid-19 patients for up to eight months after they were infected – a finding that could bode well for the upcoming vaccine rollout.

The new research, released before peer review, has also proven to be of global importance, given that antibodies persist even when no viruses are circulating in the community.

The study analyzed antibodies in a group of 112 New Zealand patients previously infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, most of whom had mild symptoms.

Antibodies play an important role in the immune system against pathogens such as the coronavirus.

Once a new virus is recognized, antibodies are specially crafted to bind to the “spike protein” and stop it from entering our cells – while signaling other parts of the immune system to destroy foreign invaders.

“Because antibodies are very specific for an invading pathogen or virus, they also provide a way to track and study a person’s history of infection,” said Dr. Nikki Moreland, an immunologist and biomedical scientist at the University of Auckland.

“In other words, by taking a blood sample of someone, and seeing if there are specific antibodies for SARS-CoV-2 in circulation, it’s possible to determine if they have previously had Covid-19.”

This is useful for diagnosis – especially when the swab has no more virus due to infection several weeks or months ago.

“By studying the level and function of circulating antibodies, it is also possible to determine whether a person has the types of antibodies that might provide protection if they encounter certain viruses or pathogens again.”

The new collaborative study, carried out by PhD student Alana Whitcombe and research scientist Dr Reuben McGregor on the Moreland team, investigates not only the quantity of antibodies in previously infected people – but also their quality.

“Specifically, do people have antibodies that bind to viral spike proteins, can these antibodies neutralize the virus, and how long do these antibodies last?” McGregor said.

In the laboratory, the researchers measured levels of circulating antibodies that bind to spike proteins, as well as whether those antibodies neutralized.

“Since we had samples from people who were infected months earlier, we can use this measurement to see how long the antibodies last.”

Antibodies play an important role in the immune system against pathogens such as the coronavirus.  Photo / 123RF
Antibodies play an important role in the immune system against pathogens such as the coronavirus. Photo / 123RF

“The good news is we observed that the majority of people have neutralizing antibodies that bind to the spike protein and they can be detected for up to eight months after infection.”

While overseas research shows this too, the main difference is that this effect has been demonstrated in countries where Covid-19 has been successfully eliminated.

“People in New Zealand are not re-exposed to the virus like they are in countries with high community transmission rates,” Moreland said.

When someone is re-exposed, he explained, their immune system boosts, which can affect levels of circulating antibodies.

That makes similar data from abroad more difficult to interpret, given it’s unclear whether antibodies were there simply as a result of re-exposure.

“In New Zealand we are fortunate not to have that problem to consider when looking at our data,” said Moreland.

“We believe the antibodies we measured came from the initial infection, so seeing these antibodies last up to eight months was really encouraging.”

What does the vaccine launch mean?

Moreland said the study offers some “positive signals”, given the data from vaccine trials showing the agent induces similar – and in some cases higher – levels of neutralizing antibodies for natural infections.

“So the protection from the vaccine is also likely to last for months and maybe even longer,” he said.

“But we are still studying in real-time, every month we see that the antibodies last one month longer.

“Also, there are several different vaccines and it is important to track the antibody response to different vaccines to measure whether there is a difference in the quality and quantity of the antibodies they produce, and how long the neutralizing antibodies to vaccines last.”

Further studies showed that scientists could accurately measure spike antibodies from finger prick blood samples.

“This could drastically improve the feasibility of large-scale studies to track vaccine antibody responses.” Whitcombe said.

The paper, uploaded to medRxiv’s pre-print server, involved doctors and scientists from the University of Otago, New Zealand Blood Service, Te Punaha Matatini, Callaghan Innovations, the Maurice Wilkins Center, Southern Community Laboratory and the City of Auckland, Starship and Kidz First Children’s Hospital .

“This work would not have been possible without a national network of doctors, nurses, researchers and scientists and highlighted the collaborative nature of New Zealand’s science during the pandemic,” said Moreland.

.



image source

The challenges of poor children increase as cheap schools continue to be closed forever | Instant News


After educational institutions closed for the second time last year due to the second wave of Covid-19, more than 300 low-cost private schools across Karachi have been permanently closed.

All Private School Management Associations (APSMA) and All Sindh Private Schools & Colleges Associations (ASPSCA) said that most of these schools have operated in underprivileged urban areas.

They say that owners and administrators of hundreds of other constituent schools have approached them for financial assistance, but the association is in no position to help them and save the futures of their thousands of students.

They indicated that around 12 private school associations operate in the province. They also pointed out that permanently closing schools would increase the number of children dropping out of school if the authorities did not take concrete action.

“As an association, we only provide legal assistance and technical support, and help member schools improve teaching and learning activities,” said ASPSCA Chairman Haider Ali. “We can’t solve the financial problems in every school.”

He said his association was collecting data on schools whose owners were unable to run their institutions after the suspension of educational activities during the second wave of Covid-19.

He also said that around 500 low-cost private schools across the province would not be able to reopen. However, he stressed, his party had not completed the closed agency data. “Extensive work like that takes time to complete.”

Agreeing with Ali, the head of APSMA Sindh Syed Tariq Shah said that low-cost private schools continue to close forever as they have to pay rent, salaries, electricity bills and taxes from the fees collected.

However, he pointed out, the parents have refused to pay the fees for the past nine months, while neither the authorities have taken the matter seriously.

He said school owners also frequently reported dropping out of school, an estimated rate of between 20 and 25 percent of enrolled students. He warned that this would continue to increase the number of school dropouts in Pakistan.

Citing Unicef ​​statistics, he said that with 22.8 million children dropping out of school, Pakistan was ranked second on the list of countries where children do not receive an education.

“Private educational institutions help the country provide access to basic education, but the authorities turn a blind eye to vulnerable units struggling to survive the current crisis.”

Crunch

School owners who recently closed their institutions for good said they were facing financial difficulties because parents refused to pay fees.

“We sent them reminders, but instead of paying tuition fees, some of them took their children out of our school,” said Habibullah, who has been running his school in the Qasba Colony.

He rented a building in 2015 to start his school. Under the usual lease agreement, he is responsible for paying monthly rent, utility bills, and maintenance costs.

“Our school is not one of the institutions established to make money. We just want to give children around access to basic education. “

He said that when educational institutions closed for the first time last year because of the outbreak of the Covid-19 case, “we somehow managed the costs. However the second wave proved more challenging for our school ”. “In addition, the uncertainty about reopening educational institutions forces us to permanently close our schools because we have no money and there is no hope that any government agency will provide us with financial assistance.”

Another school owner named Muhammad Yousaf, who once ran a school in the Ranchore Line neighborhood, said the operating costs of low-cost private educational institutions were too high.

He said such schools are generally run in disadvantaged areas, where if they do not operate according to their daily routine, parents who are mostly working class do not pay tuition.

“Every time we ask parents to pay tuition fees, they argue why they should pay if the school is closed. This is one of the main reasons forcing us to permanently close the institution. “

Uncertainty

Shah APSMA said that more schools tend to close permanently because their owners are unsure about reopening educational institutions. He pointed out that the Inter-Provincial Education Ministers Conference will be held on January 14 or 15, after which the owners may revise their decision.

He said the situation was not that simple because school owners needed to manage rent, salaries and other expenses. Therefore, he added, the authorities should pay attention to their problems, especially those running low-cost institutions.

.



image source

New Zealand’s best beaches – how to nominate your favorites | Instant News


Wainui Beach, Gisborne. Photo / J Dobson

Don’t miss your chance to nominate your favorite stretch of sand in our search for New Zealand’s Best Beaches 2021

We’re looking for the best beaches in New Zealand and we need your help. We want you to nominate your favorites, tell us why you love this beach and what makes it so special. Send us a photo of your favorite beach, too, and we’ll profile some of your entries over the summer. But hurry up, the nominations close at midnight [Sunday, January 10].

From there, your entries will be counted and the top 10 beaches will be named as our finalists, with the bonus of three wildcard entries chosen by the Herald Travel team.
You can then select one beach from the top 13 beaches to be crowned the ultimate winner.

Meanwhile, here are some of the nominees so far. Don’t see your favorite here? Vote below, or open nzherald.co.nz/bestbeach

May the best beaches win!

Matarangi Beach, Coromandel

This is one of the few beaches that are truly north facing in New Zealand with fine white sand, beautiful clear water. There is a wide variety of sea conditions for all – young shallow swimmers, ocean swimmers, boogie boarders, surfers, kite surfers, paddle surfers. The beach is never overcrowded and apart from that you can often see dolphins passing by.
Sally Waters

Kaiteriteri Beach, Nelson Tasman

I think Kaiteriteri beach is one of the best in New Zealand, known for its unique golden sand and crystal clear waters. An ideal and popular summer spot, it has everything you need for an action-packed day, from sailing, kayaking, bicycle tours and more. Even better, Kaiteriteri has more beautiful and unique beaches that are all located next to each other.
Yulan Black

Aramoana, Dunedin

Pumps up the surf, there’s awesome wildlife (sea lions and penguins) and some really cool cliffs and rocks.
Felix Page

Bark Bay, Abel Tasman National Park

It’s secluded (you have to get there by hiking or by boat), has a sloping white sand beach, with clear, sheltered sea water and deep enough to swim. It’s also supported by a national park, so it’s 99 percent natural.
Zoe Cromwell

Mangawhai Surf Beach, Northland

Mangawhai Surf Beach, Northland.  Photo / John Anggot
Mangawhai Surf Beach, Northland. Photo / John Anggot

Mangawhai is truly magical because the sunsets are amazing, you can surf, you can walk on the cliffs to see amazing bird’s eye views from places that cannot be caught on camera, there is local dune protection. Everyone must experience the Mangawhai miracle.

John Anggot

Cable Bay in Doubtless Bay, Northland

There’s an ice cream shop there, golden sand, blue water, happy people – the perfect place.
Parry Jay

Ruakaka, Northland

Ruakaka Beach, Northland.  Photo / Koby Jonas
Ruakaka Beach, Northland. Photo / Koby Jonas

Soft white sand and clear clear water that stretches for miles make this beach our favorite. Ice cream in “the chilly bin” after a day in the sun is a bonus.
Koby Jonas

Campbells Bay, Kakanui, Waitaki

Campbell Bay, Waitaki.  Photo / Sarah Hailes
Campbell Bay, Waitaki. Photo / Sarah Hailes

It’s great for families, surfers, and dog-friendly. This can keep you busy or treat you as your only friend. Take a walk to All Day Bay and back, or try a small kite. I like it.
Sarah Hailes

Matapouri Beach, Northland

Matapouri Beach, Northland.  Photo / Mark Gibson
Matapouri Beach, Northland. Photo / Mark Gibson

This beach has soft sand, warm water, and small waves perfect for swimming and body boarding. Ample parking makes it easy to prepare for a long day at the beach.
Anushree Sen Gupta

Kano Beach, on Mapoutahi in Otago

Canoe Beach has it all – beautiful for a walk with your dog, caves to walk through at low tide, rope swings, history, pā to hike and watch surfers, lovely long beaches to walk along the other side of the headland. Kano Beach is also great for swimming as it’s sheltered – you can kayak around to Osborne bay, and now there’s even a local brewery in Waitati. Nothing is missing.
Amanda Church

Wainui Beach, Gisborne

Wainui not only greets the sun before anywhere else on mainland New Zealand, it also has a fun and nurturing community, incredible waves and beautiful clear water. There is a rock pool at each end with interesting creatures. The Okitu shop, about half way down, has excellent summer food and the most friendly staff.
J Dobson

Castlepoint, Wairarapa

Castlepoint is a superb coastal formation with a variety of coastal experiences. Wild surfing and calm and safe lagoons. Stunning rock forms, lighthouses and sand dunes. Great fishing, swimming, surfing and kayaking. Stunning views and walking opportunities. Sitting under the lighthouse after dark is also a real experience. This is an authentic Kiwi beach and bach environment, with an annual horse race on the beach.
Melissa de Souza-Correa

Wharariki Beach, Golden Bay

Wharariki Beach, Golden Bay.  Photo / Patel Veerick
Wharariki Beach, Golden Bay. Photo / Patel Veerick

Wharariki only cut Mataī Bay and Castlepoint Northland for me. The three of them were very beautiful. But Wharariki won because it had exposed rocks like Cathedral Cove, providing a unique sight to behold. Has a rock pool for baby seals to swim and play. The distance is far away, which adds to its charm. There is plenty of room for multiple people to enjoy at once. Good surf. You need to take a short walk to access it, which might be considered negative, but people who tend to make an effort to reach it are less likely to litter and wreck the place. There are lots of walks, which can also expose you to a variety of wildlife.
Patel Veerick

Cathedral Cove, Coromandel

Cathedral Cove, Coromandel.  Photo / Mahdi Algargoosh
Cathedral Cove, Coromandel. Photo / Mahdi Algargoosh

Cathedral Cove is a slice of heaven. There are stunning walks to the beach, pristine clear water, waves and waterfalls. It doesn’t get much better than this.
Mahdi Algargoosh |

.



image source