Tag Archives: Hydrogen

The German Tech Giants Are Betting Big on Green Hydrogen | Instant News


Hydrogen turns into the next medium star after the sun and wind. In its most recent claim of fame, two spin-offs from German technology conglomerate Siemens join to advance green hydrogen technology by building wind-to-hydrogen systems to help decarbonize the global economy. Green hydrogen is touted as the solution to many climate change problems: it can be an energy carrier, it can be used to store energy, and it can be used in fuel cells to power vehicles. Green hydrogen is a very attractive option because its production comes from hydrolysis of water using electricity generated by renewable systems, meaning it has a much lower carbon footprint than hydrogen sourced from gas or coal.

Therefore, Siemens Gamesa and Siemens Energy have joined the growing group of green hydrogen supporters, many of whom see it as the ultimate solution to the planet’s pollution problem.

The two plan to invest $ 120 million over five years to develop a fully integrated offshore wind-to-hydrogen system involving a turbine with an electrolysis system integrated into it, the company said in a press release this week. They are targeting a full-scale demonstration of their pilots by 2025 or 2026.

“Our wind turbines play a big role in the decarbonization of the global energy system, and the potential for wind to become hydrogen means we can also do this for industries that are hard to stop. It makes me very proud that our people are part of shaping a greener future, ”said Siemens Gamesa chief executive Andreas Nauen in a release. Related: Saudi Arabia Begins New Bull Run In Middle East Oil

“With this development, the potential for areas with abundant offshore winds will be accessible to the hydrogen economy. This is a prime example of enabling us to store and transport wind energy, thereby reducing the economic carbon footprint, ”said Siemens Energy chief Christian Bruch.

But for all its promises, green hydrogen production is not a problem-free technology. This is a very expensive technology that some experts warn it may not be economically viable for years and possibly decades to come. However, some expect a large reduction in costs for the technology.

Wood Mackenzie analysts, for example, wrote last year at a report that they estimate the costs of producing green hydrogen to fall by as much as 64 percent by 2040 and in some places, even faster.

“On average, the costs of producing green hydrogen will be the same as fossil fuel-based hydrogen by 2040. In some countries, such as Germany, which is arriving in 2030. Given the increases we have seen so far, the 2020s will likely be decades of hydrogen, “the report’s author, senior research analyst Ben Gallagher wrote, added,” Rising fossil fuel prices will increase environmental competitiveness, further reinforcing the rationale for this technology in the years to come. ”

However, reducing these costs will require a fairly solid effort: currently, the cost of producing green hydrogen is between three and six times more than gas-derived hydrogen. On the other hand, the price of gas-derived hydrogen may increase as the demand for gas increases, leveling the playing field somewhat. This, however, suggests that green hydrogen will depend on the price of the gas for its competitiveness rather than on technological advances that will make the process itself cheaper.

It is clear that the energy transition will come at a cost. The question is, how high will it cost, and how much the world can afford. Solutions such as Siemens Gamesa and Siemens Energy are working on sound like how to make the process cheaper and bring green hydrogen closer to a mainstream reality. However, keep in mind that this solution will be region specific, not universal. For now, mainstream green hydrogen remains more promising than reality.

By Irina Slav for Oilprice.com

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Snam Italia, A2A collaborates to help FNM with hydrogen train | Instant News


FILE PHOTO: Italian gas group Snam logo seen outside their office in Rome, Italy, 4 June 2020. REUTERS / Guglielmo Mangiapane

MILAN (Reuters) – Italian gas group Snam and regional utility A2A are working together to find ways to refuel Italy’s FNM transport group’s new hydrogen train from renewable energy sources, the three companies said on Tuesday.

FNM said in November it would invest as much as 160 million euros ($ 196 million) to purchase a series of hydrogen-powered trains from France’s Alstom.

A2A this month signed a deal with FNM to find the best way to supply green hydrogen to power trains.

“With this agreement, we strengthen our commitment to invest in the decarbonization of Italian rail transport via hydrogen,” said Snam CEO Marco Alvera.

Snam, Europe’s largest gas transportation group, is investing in green hydrogen and says 70% of its natural gas network consists of “ready hydrogen” pipes.

($ 1 = 0.8172 euros)

Reporting by Stephen Jewkes; edited by John Stonestreet

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Italy recruits Eni, Snam and CDP to help drive the energy transition | Instant News


MILAN (Reuters) – Energy companies Eni and Snam are working with Italian sovereign lender CDP to work on an energy transition project aimed at reducing carbon emissions.

FILE PHOTO: Italian energy company Eni logo seen at a gas station in Rome, Italy August 16, 2018. REUTERS / Max Rossi

The three groups said in a joint statement on Wednesday that they would work together to produce, transport and market green hydrogen as well as use the gas for rail transport.

Italy aims to invest around 10 billion euros ($ 12.2 billion) in hydrogen by 2030 as part of its strategy to decarbonize the economy as it moves to phase out fossil fuels.

Cassa Depositi e Prestiti (CDP), controlled by the Italian Ministry of Finance, is a major shareholder of the oil and gas infrastructure group Eni and gas Snam.

The three groups said they would work together to launch a refueling station for hydrogen, natural gas and LNG (liquefied natural gas) and build infrastructure to supply LNG nationwide for transportation.

They will also develop a Carbon Capture and Storage Unit (CCUS) to produce hydrogen to cut emissions in sectors that are difficult to decarbonize, such as refineries.

The deal is part of a broader commitment to help achieve Europe’s target of reducing carbon emissions by 55% by 2030.

“Collaboration between companies is essential to achieve national and European decarbonization goals,” said CEO Snam Marco Alvera.

Snam, which derives most of its revenue from gas transportation in Italy, has promised to spend more on a new, environmentally friendly line of business.

Eni, which has pledged to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80%, is betting on large-scale CCUS investments to help clean up gas in its portfolio as oil wanes after 2025.

($ 1 = 0.8205 euros)

Reporting by Stephen Jewkes; Edited by Maria Pia Quaglia and Alexander Smith

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Italy recruits Eni, Snam and CDP to help drive the energy transition | Instant News


MILAN (Reuters) – Energy companies Eni and Snam are working with Italian sovereign lender CDP to work on an energy transition project aimed at reducing carbon emissions.

FILE PHOTO: Italian energy company Eni logo seen at a gas station in Rome, Italy August 16, 2018. REUTERS / Max Rossi

The three groups said in a joint statement on Wednesday that they would work together to produce, transport and market green hydrogen as well as use the gas for rail transport.

Italy aims to invest around 10 billion euros ($ 12.2 billion) in hydrogen by 2030 as part of its strategy to decarbonize the economy as it moves to phase out fossil fuels.

Cassa Depositi e Prestiti (CDP), controlled by the Italian Ministry of Finance, is a major shareholder of the oil and gas infrastructure group Eni and gas Snam.

The three groups said they would work together to launch a refueling station for hydrogen, natural gas and LNG (liquefied natural gas) and build infrastructure to supply LNG nationwide for transportation.

They will also develop a Carbon Capture and Storage Unit (CCUS) to produce hydrogen to cut emissions in sectors that are difficult to decarbonize, such as refineries.

The deal is part of a broader commitment to help achieve Europe’s target of reducing carbon emissions by 55% by 2030.

“Collaboration between companies is essential to achieve national and European decarbonization goals,” said CEO Snam Marco Alvera.

Snam, which derives most of its revenue from gas transportation in Italy, has promised to spend more on a new, environmentally friendly line of business.

Eni, which has pledged to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 80%, is betting on large-scale CCUS investments to help clean up gas in its portfolio as oil wanes after 2025.

($ 1 = 0.8205 euros)

Reporting by Stephen Jewkes; Edited by Maria Pia Quaglia and Alexander Smith

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$ 36 billion Australian Renewable Energy Center to produce hydrogen for export | Instant News


SYDNEY – A $ 36 billion project to mass produce hydrogen from renewable resources is underway in Australia, boosting Canberra’s hopes of turning clean energy exports into a major revenue generator as countries start avoiding coal.

The Asia Renewable Energy Hub plans to build a wind turbine and photovoltaic system generating 26,000 megawatts on a leased 6,500 sq km land in the state of Western Australia. The space for the project is six times the size of Hong Kong.

The venture will produce 1.75 million tonnes of hydrogen per year, enough fuel for a thermal power plant equivalent to six nuclear reactors. Construction is scheduled to start in 2026 following a geological survey and fundraising. Hydrogen will be converted into ammonia for transport to domestic and international markets.

The project is run by a consortium of four corporate partners, including private investment companies affiliated with Australia’s Macquarie Group.

They aim to meet Canberra’s target hydrogen production cost of 2 Australian dollars ($ 1.50) per kilogram. Hitting that target will definitely fuel demand, said an industry source in Japan, noting that current costs in the Asian country are around 1,000 yen ($ 9.60).

Australia has “lots of wind and sun [energy potential], and lots of room, “which makes it” an excellent country to invest in resources for, “said Alex Tancock, managing director of InterContinental Energy, a member of the consortium.

Renewable energy only generates about 20% of Australia’s current source of electricity.

Australia recently awarded a “Major Project Status” energy center, recognizing its “national significance” in economic development and job creation while facilitating government approval. This status is expected to assist in negotiations with business partners and investors.

The project has also received several environmental approvals from the state government.

Australia aims to become a hydrogen power plant by 2030 under the National Hydrogen Strategy launched in November 2019, and has committed AU $ 570 million to support technology development and testing operations. Canberra expects the hydrogen sector to contribute AU $ 26 billion to gross domestic product by 2050.

The global exodus from coal is leaving Australia desperate to promote hydrogen. Coal and liquefied natural gas make up a quarter of the country’s exports.

When Japan, a major market, recently announced its goal of achieving zero-net greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, Kobad Bhavnagri of research firm BloombergNEF called the move tantamount to servicing “divorce papers” in Australia.

A lignite mine in the state of Victoria, Australia. There are plans to produce hydrogen from low quality coal for export to Japan.

But coal and natural gas can be used to produce hydrogen.

A group that includes Japan’s Kawasaki Electric Power Development and Industry, known as J-Power, is pursuing pilots to produce hydrogen from lignite – a low grade coal known as brown coal – in Australia, then liquefy it for shipment to Japan. The consortium also includes Australian power company AGL.

Deliveries are expected in early March in the AU $ 500 million project, for which the governments of Australia and the southeastern state of Victoria pay a combined AU $ 100 million.

Another hydrogen project is also underway in Australia. The biggest challenges involve securing long-term buyers and scaling up production.

“Without a long-term contract, a project cannot move into construction,” said an industry insider. Many countries including Japan are trying to utilize hydrogen as their main energy source, but they have not started full efforts to build infrastructure.

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