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Racing: Star coach Jamie Richards made New Zealand racing history on Boxing Day in Ellerslie | Instant News


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Amarelinha grabbed a comfortable win in Group 2 of the Jamieson Park Eight Carat Classic (1600m) in Ellerslie yesterday. Photo / Kirstin Ledington

Young gun trainer Jamie Richards has written another page for himself in New Zealand’s racing history books and this is one that will probably never be matched.

The 30-year-old coached six winners at the giant gathering of Ellerslie Boxing Day, the first time any coach has coached six people a day on the country’s main tracks, let alone on such a big race day. And they came in consecutive races.

Other coaches have had six winning days on the smaller tracks, but never at the racing base.

One of Matamata Richards’ idols, Dave O’Sullivan, holds the previous record, which was also set on Boxing Day in 1993, when he coached five winners.

O’Sullivan’s son Lance picked up six winners that day but neither coach has a six-win pocket and Richards, coach for Te Akau, also finished second and third in the other two races.

Even for a young man who almost dominated our training rankings, this was something special of a ninth ranked coach in the world.

“These big days are special for all of us, this is why we got out of bed and worked so hard,” said Richards.

“A lot of people have helped this day happen and it’s something I will never forget.”

The six timekeeper started with the Palamos, who looked to be a ready-made favorite for the Karaka Million winning youth race while Entriviere saw open-class material push away its rivals in race four.

Vamos Bebe’s win at the listed Hallmark Stud Sprint did not come without a cloud over him as he bled immediately after the race, forcing a mandatory three month retreat from the race.

The black type acquired yesterday has added further sparkle to the value of his already enormous commercial broodmare but Richards says he may not be retired yet even if it would be a viable option.

Brando looked like a new three-year-old boy with the way he beat his rivals at the top of the Shaw Wire Ropes Uncle Remus gave Richards his fourth win and took the lead next to the Levin Classic at Trentham, where Group 1 triumph looks like his to take.

Mai Tai then stormed the house to claim the Stella Artois Final worth $ 80,000 for a 1500m intermediate horse.

But even after the five beautiful runners, Richards thinks he may have saved the best for last because Amarelinha, only at his third start, won the Group 2 Jamieson Park Eight Carat Classic.

He raced past his little rivals on the home side and ran under Opie Bosson, who divided Richards’ six coaching winners with Danielle Johnson.

“We had a lot of talent on display today, but he’s probably the most interesting,” said Richards.

“He’s still untouched and now heading to the Karaka Classic Mile and there should be a chance.”

The six-time timekeeper led Richards to 78 victories in the national premier league, a remarkable 44 wins from second-placed Stephen Marsh who also won twice yesterday. Richards’ catch took him to 13 black-type wins for the season and on the verge of $ 2 million in stakes in New Zealand, without supplementing Probabeel’s hefty Australian earnings.

With a season in less than five months, Richards has had seven months to try and work past $ 4.48 million rivals Murray Baker and home to Andrew Forsman acquired in the 2017-18 season.

A key meeting in the chase is the night of the Karaka Million on January 23, but after yesterday nothing surprised Richards next.

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Covid 19 coronavirus: How will the first available vaccine in New Zealand work? | Instant News


BioNTech and Pfizer’s mRNA coronavirus vaccines could be launched in New Zealand early next year, subject to final testing and approval. Photo / Provided

The mRNA coronavirus vaccine, which could arrive in New Zealand as early as next year, subject to final tests and regulations, will be the latest incarnation of the immunological revolution sweeping science. Professor Graham

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Covid 19 coronavirus: All you need to know about today’s vaccine announcement | Instant News


The government today announced its first Covid-19 vaccine purchase agreement. What does it mean? Science reporter Jamie Morton explain.

What has been announced?

A deal that will provide New Zealand with about 1.5 million Covid-19 vaccines – or enough for 750,000 people.

But it is up to the vaccine makers – Pfizer and BioNTech – to successfully complete Phase III clinical trials, and pass regulatory approval here.

All is well, the vaccine could be shipped to New Zealand in the first quarter of next year, said Minister for Research, Science and Innovation Megan Woods.

“Pfizer says they are making good progress with the development of the Covid-19 vaccine,” he said.

“Depending on clinical and regulatory success, and provided the vaccine is approved for use here in New Zealand by Medsafe, it is likely that multiple doses will be available to us in the first part of 2021.”

What is the vaccine?

Global drug giant Pfizer and German biotechnology company BioNTech are behind a group of candidates – BNT162b2 – who are among the pioneers in the worldwide vaccine race.

Research so far has shown that this virus boosts antibody and T cell responses to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19.

T-cells are white blood cells that can attack cells infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, while antibodies are able to neutralize the virus so that they cannot infect cells when they are first infected.

Overall, you have a strong shield against the coronavirus.

As an RNA vaccine, this vaccine works by bringing genetic material into cells, before being encoded for specific proteins from the virus.

As of this week, the vaccine is in its third and final Phase III trial at more than 120 locations around the world, with 28,000 people having been given a second dose.

This month, the two companies launched rolling submissions to the European Medicines Agency, while Health Canada has begun a real-time review of its candidates.

Is this the only vaccine we can use?

Professor Helen Petousis-Harris, University of Auckland vaccination specialist, said today’s announcement marks the first – and not the last, purchase agreement.

“There are still others on the table too,” he said.

Focus: How to stop the spread of the corona virus. Video / AP / Mark Mitchell

Australia, for example, has signed an agreement to mass-produce the University of Oxford and the AstraZeneca virus vector vaccine, ChAdOx1-S, also in Phase III trials.

It was shown to trigger a T cell response within 14 days of vaccination – and an antibody response within 28 days.

Like the influenza injections we are more used to, this is a viral vector vaccine, and uses a chunk of the pathogen to effectively stimulate an immune response against it.

Petousis-Harris said another pioneer was the LNP-encapsulated mRNA vaccine developed by the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and Massachusetts-based Moderna.

This month, eight groups received 17 vaccines in Phase III.

It is widely expected that the first vaccine will start rolling out at the end of the second quarter, or early third quarter, of 2021.

“So we hope it will be the middle of next year where we really start to see a vaccine available,” he said.

“But [the Pfizer-BioNTech candidate] potentially arriving a little earlier than that. “

How does this fit into New Zealand’s strategy?

The government says this complements other parts of our broader and recently launched vaccine strategy, such as the global Covax Facility which can provide for up to 50 percent of our population’s needs.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern visited the Malaghan Medical Research Institute in Wellington, which is involved in a local consortium working on locally made vaccines.  Photo / Getty Images
Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern visited the Malaghan Medical Research Institute in Wellington, which is involved in a local consortium working on locally made vaccines. Photo / Getty Images

It’s allocating hundreds of millions of dollars – won’t reveal exactly how much, for commercial reasons – to take the Kiwis and our Pacific neighbors as far as possible.

“The primary objective of our portfolio approach is to ensure we have flexibility and choice when it comes to securing the right vaccine for New Zealand and our Pacific neighbors,” said Woods.

The task force executing the strategy is now negotiating with other pharmaceutical companies, with further announcements expected next month.

Woods said “good progress” was being made on the deal, and having additional deals would ensure enough vaccines were available for the entire country.

There are concerns at a high level over New Zealand’s gaining early access.

One recently released Cabinet paper since August indicated that the Government is concerned that New Zealand’s COVID-19-free status and good health could mean it would not be prioritized if global priorities and allocations were simply left to needs assessments.

It recommends that New Zealand needs to provide “significant resources early on to help secure access to vaccines”.

Having a series of advance purchase agreements means potential access to a number of vaccine candidates, but it does not guarantee access to vaccines, as “it is likely that the majority of candidates considered will not be viable”.

Such prepayments cannot be recovered once they have been paid.

Determining the cost of the upfront agreement would be difficult, money had to be allocated to get started, the document said.

It is expected that early delivery of the vaccine costs between $ 75 and $ 150 per dose when slower delivery can cost less than $ 15.

So, who might get the vaccine first?

The call has yet to be made, but the Ministry of Health is working on what the immunization program should look like.

“A number of factors will influence who will receive what vaccine and when, such as data on trials of the suitability of each vaccine for a particular age group,” said Health Minister Chris Hipkins.

“We have set aside $ 66.3 million for medical supplies and infrastructure to ensure New Zealand is ready to launch the Covid-19 Immunization Program as soon as we have a safe and effective vaccine.

“Most of this investment will finance supplies sufficient to support the countries of New Zealand and the Pacific; supplies such as PPE, syringes, syringes and swabs, and refrigerators to store vaccines.”

What about local vaccine production?

The Covid-19 Vaccine Company led by Dr Robert Feldman aims to complete the first human trials of a new vaccine by the end of next year, which will cost about $ 8 million.  Photo / Provided
The Covid-19 Vaccine Company led by Dr Robert Feldman aims to complete the first human trials of a new vaccine by the end of next year, which will cost about $ 8 million. Photo / Provided

It happened too.

About $ 3 million in Government funding will go to Kiwi biotech company Biocell to upgrade its facilities so that it can launch 100 million doses.

Other Kiwi consortiums have been exploring potential candidates of their own – such as the inactivated vaccine approach led by Professor Miguel QuiƱones-Mateu of the University of Otago, and a recombinant spike protein vaccine under development at the University of Victoria’s Dr Davide Comoletti laboratory – over the past few years. month.

And a local company has secured $ 3.3 million in private funding to go ahead with a Covid-19 vaccine made with Kiwi technology.

The Covid-19 Vaccine Corporation (CVC), which was founded in May, has collaborated with the University of Auckland, Callaghan Innovation, and the research institute Scion, in an effort to independently develop a local coronavirus agent.

The company aims to complete its first human trials of the new vaccine by the end of next year, at a cost of about $ 8 million.

– Additional reporting – RNZ

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