Tag Archives: Lake

Australian SailGP Team for Season Two | Instant News


Australian SailGP Team for Season Two

by Australian SailGP Team 7 Apr 17:07 PDT

(Left to right) Tom Slingsby, Nina Curtis, Sam Newton, Lisa Darmanin Jason Waterhouse © Team Australia SailGP

Olympic Gold Medalist and Defending SailGP Champion Tom Slingsby reveals his team’s line-up to defend the Australian Championship title in SailGP Season 2.

After securing history by gaining victory as SailGP’s first Inaugural Champion, Slingsby, helm and CEO of the Australian team, has selected several members of his winning squad to join him in season 2, which kicks off in Bermuda April 24-25.

Apart from Slingsby, athletes returning from the winning squad include, Kyle Langford, 31, from Lake Macquarie, New South Wales (wing trimmer); Jason Waterhouse, 29, from Sydney (flight controller) Sam Newton, 35, from Sydney (grinder) and Kinley Fowler, 33, from Perth, Western Australia, (grinder / flight controller).

Nick Hutton will join the Australian team for Season 2 as a grinder, replacing Ky Hurst who has stepped out of the team to spend more time with his family in Australia. Hutton, originally from England, is the only international member of the majority of the Australian crew. He joins a team with a wealth of experience aboard a high-speed F50 catamaran, having previously sailed on the UK SailGP Team. He will join the crew having recently competed in the British Challenger for the 36th Copa America.

The squad also includes two successful candidates from the Australian SailGP Team’s women’s development program, Olympic Silver medalist Lisa Darmanin, 29, from Sydney and Nina Curtis, 32, from Sydney. The initiative launched last year aims to accelerate the inclusion of female athletes in the league.

The early phase of the program saw Darmanin and Curtis join the team for the season opening event in Bermuda in April. After pre-season training and development in Bermuda at least one athlete will be selected to join the team for the remainder of SailGP Season 2.

Commenting on the line-up for Season 2 Slingsby said: “Our squad features some of the most talented sailors in our country, including Olympians, Sydney To Hobart alumni and American Cup winners. We have proven how strong the team we have after our success in Season 1 and their ability and experience at the F50 will be very important when we face new tough competitions this season, such as Team New Zealand Peter Burling and AS Jimmy Spithill. Team. “We have used the time off between seasons to review our performance as a team and assess the improvements we can make. We are back hungrier than ever, with the aim of bringing home the Championship trophy for Australia. ”

In addition to Darmanin and Curtis to the Slingsby team added, “Lisa and Nina will be the first female athletes to sail the Australian F50, which is an important step in our mission as a league to increase opportunities for women in the sport. They are arguably two of the best female seafarers in Australia, and I’m looking forward to seeing how they use their years of experience competing in the Olympics and other competitions to develop their skills beyond the F50. ”

The dynamic league expanded Season 2 roster will consist of seven other Grand Prix Screen events, starting in Bermuda on April 24-25, and visiting Taranto, Italy (June 5-6), Plymouth, United Kingdom (July 17-18), Saint Louis. -Tropez, France (11-12 September), Cádiz, Spain (9-10 October), Christchurch, New Zealand (29-30 January 2022) and San Francisco, USA (26-27 March 2022).

The second season of SailGP will feature defending Australian champion Tom Slingsby, along with crews from Denmark, France, Great Britain, Japan, New Zealand, Spain and the United States. The season culminates with the Grand Final in San Francisco on March 26-27, 2022, when the champions will be determined in a one-million winner-take-all final.

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Switzerland- Studies point to lake methane as a future energy source | Instant News


(MENAFN – Swissinfo) Lakes, a source of 20% of global natural methane emissions, could also be a source of global energy, if handled properly, said the Swiss researcher.

This content is published April 4, 2021 – 18:23 April 4, 2021 – 18:23 Keystone-SDA / dos

In a paper published this week, researchers from Basel and Zurich suggest a way to more efficiently extract the methane that naturally develops when biomass rots in lakes.

Methane, which is 25 times more harmful to the climate than carbon dioxide, is mostly produced by the petroleum industry and agriculture. However, one fifth of all methane emissions are generated naturally in lakes. This “in theory would be sufficient to meet all the world’s energy needs,” said University of Basel scientist Maciej Bartosiewicz.

Bartosiewicz, along with Przemyslaw Rzepka and Moritz Lehmann, claim to have developed a concept – using a filter-like membrane made of a porous mineral called zeolite – to extract this gas more efficiently.

Until recently, the only place in the world where methane was extracted from lakes and used to generate electricity was Lake Kivu, in Central Africa. However, these bodies of water enjoy enormous amounts of methane, 100 times more than in ordinary lakes. Such operations have not been profitable elsewhere, said the University of Basel in its press release.

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New Zealand rugby calls on players to take a tiny slice of a bigger pie amid a $ 465 million private equity standoff | Instant News


New Zealand Rugby boss Mark Robinson on the Silver Lakes All Blacks deal. Video / Provided

What continues to separate New Zealand Rugby from the New Zealand Rugby Players Association in their respective views of the Silver Lake proposal is their assessment of the potential risk and who carries it.

Under the terms of the Silver Lake deal, NZR asked NZRPA to agree to take a smaller share of the significantly larger potential revenue.

Players currently receive 36.5 percent of NZR revenue – known as Player Pay Pool (PPP) which has averaged around $ 190 million over the past five years.

The NZR pushes that percentage down to between 30 and 32 percent, but estimates that total revenue will surge to around $ 350 million by 2025 if Silver Lake takes part and will potentially climb again to somewhere closer to $ 500 million a year later. that.

Players will get a huge windfall if they agree to a deal in its current form and Silver Lake is able to make a transformational change in their promised annual income.

Both the NZR and NZRPA agree that it is imperative that there is enough money available to keep the salaries of New Zealand’s top players competitive and for the country to continue to retain talent.

New Zealand Rugby Players Association boss, Rob Nichol.  Photos / Photosport
New Zealand Rugby Players Association boss, Rob Nichol. Photos / Photosport

But the NZRPA has a different view to the NZR on the level of risk inherent in the proposal and it is these issues that need to be resolved in the follow-up mediation discussions planned for this week.

Silver Lake has not detailed its revenue growth plans. They have made an ambitious forecast based on a broad concept that effectively boils down to making money from an offshore All Blacks fan base that is believed to be as high as 65 million.

The NZRPA is not exactly anti-Silver Lake or underestimating its ability to make money as it says it can but needs to look in more detail to have more confidence.

The player body would also like to have a better understanding of how the NZR could reduce the risk of a deal not generating as much revenue as it had anticipated.

The proposal is for NZR to sell 15 percent of its future revenue but continue to be responsible for 100 percent of the costs of running the game.

If growth is not as high as forecast, the NZR could find itself with less, not more money as it will only have an 85 percent share of future revenue but still be responsible for meeting the fixed costs of playing players and provincial guilds.

The fear is that if income growth fails, the NZR could be forced to sell more assets to save.

New Zealand Rugby chief executive, Mark Robinson.  Photos / Photosport
New Zealand Rugby chief executive, Mark Robinson. Photos / Photosport

The NZRPA can negotiate to protect professional players from the downside, by including a clause that requires NZR to fulfill its agreed obligations to PPP.

But doing so would jeopardize the funding available for other parts of the game and would ultimately be catastrophic for everyone.

The two bodies, who spent Wednesday locked in mediation talks, are actually more in tune than has been described.

They agreed on the need to inject more capital into the game and found ways to use it to help foster and maintain community play.

However, they need to find ways to mitigate potential risks in such a way that they do not force larger sales or assets or jeopardize future investment at the grassroots.

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NZ Millennium Cup begins, with an innovative scoring system | Instant News


NZ Millennium Cup begins, with an innovative scoring system

by Isla McKechnie / Albatross PR Mar 28 6:57 AM PDT
March 29, 2021

NZ builds Silvertip superyacht racing in NZ Millennium Cup | © Jeff Brown

The NZ Millennium Cup is in progress, with a new innovative handicap system for superyacht regattas.

New Zealand’s summer racing continues, as the NZ Millennium Cup gets underway with a welcoming event at the Duke of Marlborough, sponsored by Southern Spars.

Sunday night’s event marks the start of the South Pacific’s longest-running superyacht regatta and also marks a new era in the superyacht ranking system.

This year’s race will be especially exciting with the introduction of a different handicap scoring method developed for superyacht racing by the Offshore Racing Congress (ORC). This is the first time it will be used in a superyacht regatta, although it is used by the ORC for non-superyacht regatta, and uses the average wind speed experienced at the course of the race and calculated on the elapsed time around the course of the winning ship in corrected times. .

New system; The Performance Curve score was adopted by race handicappers (ORC) and specific competitors for the NZ Millennium Cup regatta, with representatives from each cruise ship expressing excitement about the new methods to be used in the coming week.

At a pre-race briefing, the lead racing officer, Harold Bennett, develops race plans for the competitors. Citing the urge to ensure exciting racing, Bennett described the morning race to be windy / strong winds around Ninepin as the top score, while the afternoon race would be longer, using a combination of the many islands in the Bay of Islands, plus the occasional buoy, to make sure the yacht is tested with leg of the wind, reaching out and downwind.

With the formality of racing, owners, crew and guests settle in to enjoy the hospitality of the Duke of Marlborough, including the Mount Gay Cocktails which are a nod to Russell’s colonial-era reputation as one of the wildest ports in the Pacific. With Mount Gay’s Missionary’s Downfall in hand, guests are treated to Bruno Trouble, as they prepare for the race in one of the world’s largest natural playgrounds which kicks off on Monday morning.

The sailing race, which runs from March 28-31, is one of the must-do regatts on the world’s superyacht circuit and has garnered a reputation as a fun, friendly, but highly competitive regatta. The Cup marks the final chapter in an exhilarating racing season in New Zealand.

The sailing competition was first held in conjunction with the 2000 American Cup and is now in its 15th year. It is the South Pacific’s longest running superyacht race and has built a reputation for friendship and fierce competition.

The screen race will be available to watch live www.millenniumcup.com.

Race Notices and Sailing Instructions have amendments issued, and can be found at www.millenniumcup.com.

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Record crowds in New Zealand singing along with Rod Stewart to send a message of unity to the world | Instant News


Record crowds in New Zealand singing along with Rod Stewart to send a message of unity to the world

by Ella McDonald Mar 13 7:51 AM PST

America’s Cup match day 3 – Rock the Dock with Rod Stewart | © ACE / Studio Borlenghi

Thousands of New Zealanders have joined British rock icon Rod Stewart in a national anthem of his hit song, Sailing, to send a message of togetherness to the world.

The Rock the Dock campaign features Sir Rod Stewart performing his iconic powerful and emotional song Sailing, from a boat on the River Thames in London, with a previously recorded show beamed onto the big screens of Te Wero in Auckland, America’s Cup New Zealand Village, and broadcast by partners. official program, TVNZ.

The 36th Copa America was set to be New Zealand’s opportunity to welcome visitors from around the world, but this did not happen – so 100% Pure New Zealand saw an opportunity to send a message of unity and togetherness to America’s Cup contenders and their fans around the world.

“Aotearoa and Manaakitanga’s warm welcome was fully featured today, as we cheered on our international friends and became supporting singers for our partner Rod,” said Tourism New Zealand, Interim Chief Executive, René de Monchy.

“New Zealand is very proud to host the 36th Copa America, and it is great to show our support for the New Zealand Emirates Team and the international teams who come to compete.”

The iconic rocker said this,

“I have a big soft spot for New Zealand because my two kids are Kiwis and so I am delighted to be part of the Copa America, joining the Kiwis to send this message of togetherness to the world. I hope my performance of Sailing brings joy to fans in the future. this hard time. ”

As well as a special message for the Kiwis,

“A special thank you or ‘kia ora’ to the people of New Zealand. I really enjoyed the Sailing show and watching the Kiwis sing along. During my many visits the Kiwis have always been friendly, fun and warm and I’m looking forward to coming back to New Zealand this time. next year. ”

Auckland Unlimited spokesperson, Chief Executive, Nick Hill commented: “We are grateful to be able to host a major global sporting event amidst the pandemic at Tamaki Makaurau Auckland. It is not without challenges, but we know the world has changed. Watching the amazing spectacle unfold in Hauraki Bay and save these photos for future travels. It seems appropriate to mark the start of the 36th Copa America with something special that brings the country together. ”

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