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The Beatles: Ringo Starr recalls the bitter joke George Harrison made on … | Instant News


18 January 2021, 17:10

Ringo Starr revealed the last extraordinary thing George Harrison said to him on his deathbed in a 2011 documentary.

Image: Grove Street / Spitfire Images


Ringo Starr recalled the last words his good friend and fellow Beatle George Harrison had spoken to him in his last days at his home in Switzerland, before his death on November 30, 2001.

Ringo Starr reveal the last thing Beatles‘star George Harrison said to him on his deathbed, and it was so moving.

In footage taken from Martin Scorsese’s documentary George Harrison: Living in a Material World, Ringo Starr shared what was said on his last visit to the Beatle star’s home in Switzerland.

The Beatle had surgery for throat cancer in 1998 and was treated for lung cancer and brain tumors not long before his death in 2001.

In footage taken from George Harrison's Martin Scorsese documentary: Living in the Material World, Ringo Starr reveals what was said on his last visit to the Beatle star's home in Switzerland.

In footage taken from George Harrison’s Martin Scorsese documentary: Living in the Material World, Ringo Starr reveals what was said on his last visit to the Beatle star’s home in Switzerland.

Image: Grove Street / Spitfire Images


George Harrison underwent surgery for throat cancer in 1998 and was treated for lung cancer and brain tumor shortly before his death in 2001. Photo, Ringo Starr.

George Harrison underwent surgery for throat cancer in 1998 and was treated for lung cancer and brain tumor shortly before his death in 2001. Photo, Ringo Starr.

Image: Grove Street / Spitfire Images


Ringo Starr remember going to see George just before traveling to Boston to see his daughter, who had a brain tumor.

“The last weeks of George’s life, he was in Switzerland, and I went to see him, and he was very sick,” Ringo explained, “you know, he can only lie down.”

“And when she was sick and I came to see her, I went to Boston, because my daughter has a brain tumor.

“And I said, ‘Well, you know, I have to go, I have to go to Boston’ and he … Phew, those were the last words I heard him say,” Ringo said, clearly moved. in memory.

“Actually … and he said, ‘Do you want me to come with you?'”

“The last weeks of George’s life, he was in Switzerland, and I went to see him, and he was very sick,” explained Ringo, “you know, he can only lie down.”.

Image: Grove Street / Spitfire Images


“Those were the last words I heard him say,” said Ringo, moved clearly as he reminisced about his last time with George Harrison.

Image: Grove Street / Spitfire Images


“Oh, God,” he added, emotionally as he told the story. “So, you know, that’s the extraordinary side of George …”

George Harrison: Living in a Material World was released in 2011 and features archival footage, home videos, and in-depth interviews with people close to the star, including Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan, Phil Spector, and Pattie Boyd.

George HarrisonWife Olivia, who collaborated on the film, said at the release she “almost didn’t want people to see it. It’s like showing everyone your most private place.”

George was the lead guitarist for The Beatles and wrote some of the band’s best-loved songs including ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’ and ‘Something’.

“He left this world while he was living in it, God-conscious, unafraid of death, and at peace, surrounded by family and friends,” the Harrisons said in a statement. Photograph, George and Ringo in 1964.

Picture:
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The star died at the age of 58 of lung cancer on November 30, 2001.

He was in Los Angeles, where he was traveling for his last days, and obeyed The New York TimesHis wife, Olivia, and son, Dhani, 24, were with him when he died at the home of Gavin De Becker, an old friend.

“He left this world while he was living in it, God-conscious, unafraid of death, and at peace, surrounded by family and friends,” the Harrisons said in a statement. “She used to say, ‘Everything can wait but the search for God can’t wait,’ and ‘love one another’.”

The video came later Paul McCartney recently said in an interview on NPR All things considered that he liked communicating with George Harrison via the large coniferous tree that Beatle gave him before his death.

Paul McCartney recently said in an interview on NPR's All Things Consider that he loved communicating with George Harrison through the large coniferous tree that Beatle gave him before his death.  Photograph, Paul and George in 1965.

Paul McCartney recently said in an interview on NPR’s All Things Consider that he loved communicating with George Harrison through the large coniferous tree that Beatle gave him before his death. Photograph, Paul and George in 1965.

Picture:
Getty


The Beatles photographed in 1966. (Left to Right) Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and John Lennon.

The Beatles photographed in 1966. (Left to Right) Ringo Starr, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and John Lennon.

Picture:
Getty


“George is very fond of horticulture, [he was] a really good gardener, “said Paul.” He gave me [the] tree as a gift. It was a big spruce and near my gate. “

“When I left my house [on the morning of Dec. 18], I got out of the car and closed the gate and looked up at the tree and said, ‘Hi, George,’ “McCartney detailed.” There he is, growing strong … It brings me back to the time when I hitched a ride with him! [George and John Lennon still have] an ever-present presence. “

McCartney continues: “It was beautiful. He gave it to me, so I just planted it. But then, as time went by, every time I saw it, I said, ‘That’s the tree George gave me.’ George had put it in a tree for me. I hope he’s happy with that. “

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Climate analysis: 2020 was also a hot year for the wider New Zealand region | Instant News


A fisherman tries his luck at Pilot Bay, Mt Maunganui, on a sunny November day. The year ended one of the warmest NZ has ever seen in and out of water. Photo / George Novak

Last year was not only one of the 10 hottest for New Zealand, but also for our wider ocean area, new figures show.

Climate scientist Professor Jim Salinger said his calculations – placing 2020 as the ninth hottest year on record for New Zealand’s land and ocean regions combined – underlined the need for urgent action to slow the rate of warming.

According to state officials, Niwa ran The “seven stations” temperature series, which Salinger pioneered, 2020 is New Zealand’s seventh warmest in 110 years.

The national average of 13.24C follows a climate change trend that places six of our last eight years among the warmest on record, and was pushed for 47 consecutive months without temperatures below the overall average.

New Zealand's official mean temperature for 2020 - calculated using a series of seven stations - proves the seventh hottest on record.  Image / Provided
New Zealand’s official mean temperature for 2020 – calculated using a series of seven stations – proves the seventh hottest on record. Image / Provided

Salinger said the wider picture could be seen as more climate stations and ocean temperatures were added.

Nonetheless, it is also consistent with planetary changes.

Sea surface temperatures around New Zealand’s four million square kilometers of exclusive economic zone averaged 14.16C last year, which was 0.38C above normal and the 11th warmest on record.

And the extended data set for ground temperatures, covering 22 stations, recorded a 2020 average of 13.75C – 0.58C above normal and the eighth warmest year in the series.

When those extra ocean and land temperatures put together, the result was 13.93C – or 0.39 above average and the ninth warmest year on record for a combined 150 years.

Salinger said it was important to consider how New Zealand’s vast marine area is also warming, given its economic and environmental importance to our country.

About 20 times the size of our landmass, New Zealand’s oceans support a marine economy that is estimated to be worth $ 4 billion a year.

The resources it relies on are increasingly threatened by rising sea temperatures.

The Tasman Sea, in particular, is warming at one of the fastest speeds on Earth – up to three times the global average.

About 20 times the size of our landmass, New Zealand's oceans support a marine economy that is estimated to be worth $ 4 billion a year.  Image / Ministry of Environment
About 20 times the size of our landmass, New Zealand’s oceans support a marine economy that is estimated to be worth $ 4 billion a year. Image / Ministry of Environment

“If we are in a situation where we are effectively taking a warm shower, it will affect us dramatically,” he said.

“These numbers really show that warming is leaping forward, and we need to do it now, both in terms of mitigation and adaptation.”

The share acquisition followed Salinger, with fellow scientists Professor James Renwick and Dr. Howard Diamond, published findings indicate that the New Zealand region has warmed to 0.66C since 1871.

All of the warmest years have been recorded since 1998, in line with global warming.
Salinger noted that the La Nina system have an influence on ocean temperatures in 2020.

The formation of naturally occurring climate drivers later in the year coincides with the coastal waters around parts of New Zealand close to ocean heat wave conditions.

Annular Southern Mode, or SAM – a key climate indicator – is also in a positive phase for the 2020 period, bringing westerly winds further south over the southern oceans but lighter winds and clearer skies over New Zealand.

This week our coastal waters are warmer than usual – ranging from 0.5C to 0.9 above average – but ocean temperatures are expected to drop as the south changes.

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The death of a Melbourne family: Mother Katie Perinovic’s final days before child murder | Instant News


Neighbors pieced together events that took place in the days leading up to the shocking moment of a Melbourne mother who is believed to have killed her three children before committing suicide.

The bodies of Katie Perinovic, her two daughters Claire, 7, and Anna, 5, and son Matthew, 3, were found inside their Tullamarine home, in the northern suburbs of the city, on Thursday afternoon.

Perinovic’s husband, Tomislav, 48, called emergency services and was questioned by police before he was released without charge.

Less than 24 hours before the shocking murder, 42-year-old Perinovic had dropped a bag of prunes at the home of his neighbors on Burgess St, Daniel and Vicky Schembri.

Mr Schembri, who has lived on the street with his wife for 48 years, said Perinovic knocked on the door at 5.30pm on Wednesday. He thanked her, and she said “Bye,” she told NCA Newswire.

Just two days earlier, the Schembris family had heard children play happily in their pop-up pool. “They screamed and screamed and had fun and all that,” he told The Australian.

The Perinovic family.  Photo / Facebook
The Perinovic family. Photo / Facebook

The Perinovics are well known among their neighbors. The children wish Mr Schembri a happy new year. Kevin and Clare Harrison, who live opposite the family, visited on Christmas Day to give gifts to the children.

“We sat with them for a while and Tom was on the floor playing with little Matthew in the car we gave him,” she told The Australian. “He helped the girls unpack their pieces. We just laughed and joked about things.”

On Thursday afternoon, the children died, after an act that sent shockwaves into a usually deserted community.

“Investigators are not sure the 48-year-old man was involved in the incident and police are not looking for anyone further on the matter,” police said on Thursday afternoon.

“Killing Squad investigators have formed the initial view that the 42-year-old woman was responsible for all four deaths and once their investigation is complete, a report will be provided for consideration by the coroner.”

Locals are now trying to find out if there is any clue as to what they saw and heard about the family hours earlier.

One of the local parents who arrived back from the village trip at around 4pm on Wednesday told the Herald Sun that they saw Perinovic visiting another house on the street and talking to the owner of the house named Freddie in an act that now looks extraordinary.

A woman leaves flowers outside Perinovic's house.  Photo / NCA NewsWire
A woman leaves flowers outside Perinovic’s house. Photo / NCA NewsWire

A young mother living around the corner told Herald Sun that she had returned from morning coffee with friends on Thursday morning when she heard a very loud scream coming from Burgess St.

He is now convinced that the agitated cry at around 11.45am was Perinovic. About half an hour later, the mother said, she heard sirens.

‘INTERESTING’

Marie Groves’ family friend said she last saw Perinovic when the mother of three visited her home in November for a party.

Groves said Perinovic appeared “very quiet and reserved”.

“On November 29, I invited her to meet and help celebrate my daughter’s birthday with my children,” Groves told NCA NewsWire on Thursday morning.

“She was only there for a short time … her two older daughters were very much like mine, they chatted and laughed – typical of seven year olds, they are pretty kids.

“On that day he seemed a little aloof – that’s not unusual – he was very quiet … come to think of it maybe that’s a clue?”

Groves said he didn’t really know Perinovic’s husband, Tomislav, because he “worked around the clock.”

Groves, who has developed a close bond with Perinovic as their children grew up together, said the last time he saw his neighbor was before Christmas, when he also seemed “a little quieter than usual”.

Police at the scene today.  Photo / NCA NewsWire
Police at the scene today. Photo / NCA NewsWire

However, he added, nothing seemed out of the ordinary.

Schembris said Perinovic moved into the next house about 25 years ago before he met his future wife.

“Once they got married, she got pregnant,” said Schembri, adding that Perinovic looked “happy”.

Schembris said they used to see children who were “very active” all the time playing and riding their bikes on the road. The oldest, Claire, is getting dance lessons and the youngest is starting school.

Claire and Anna both attended St Christopher’s Elementary School on the outskirts of West Airport.

“Now, in heaven,” said Schembri. “They are very good children.”

The first indication he had that something was wrong on Thursday was seeing emergency services rushing onto the streets.

“We saw Tom sitting in a chair with his hands behind his back,” she said.

“She was quiet – numb.

“And then they took him to the police car.”

A tribute outside the Melbourne home in which a mother and three children died.  Photo / News Corp Australia
A tribute outside the Melbourne home in which a mother and three children died. Photo / News Corp Australia

Schembri said his heart broke thinking about the three children wishing him a happy new year, eating sweets, two weeks ago. “How could this happen?” she says.

LEFT JOB

Perinovic’s former colleague, who is a physiotherapist, told the Herald Sun that they were devastated to learn of the death.

It is known that he left the Glenroy Physiotherapy clinic unexpectedly about three months ago.

Acting Deputy Commissioner Robert Hill said police will work to support the families of those involved and ensure they get the help they need.

“I know there will be many people in society who are struggling to understand and accept this tragedy,” he said.

Perinovic in particular "drawn" in the weeks preceding the tragedy.  Photo / Facebook
Perinovic was especially “withdrawn” in the weeks preceding the tragedy. Photo / Facebook

“It is also a very difficult time for the police and paramedics, who responded to and attended the scene yesterday.

“This is a very heart wrenching experience for all parties.”

Lee, a team manager at the West Meadows paramedic unit, also laid flowers at the scene and took a moment to reflect outside the home.

Speaking to NCA NewsWire, he said about five of his paramedics responded to Thursday’s horror and were “shaken”.

“The loss of three children is affecting everyone including our staff,” he said.

“This isn’t normal … yes we have a troublesome element in our roles, but incidents like this are rare.”

Claire, 7, and Anna, 5, died in a murder-suicide allegation.  Photo / Facebook
Claire, 7, and Anna, 5, died in a murder-suicide allegation. Photo / Facebook

On Fridays, mourners lay flowers and cards on the property.

One child, Anabelle, left a handwritten note on the gate moments before detectives left the scene with a brown evidence bag.

“To Claire, Anna, Matt, and Katie. You are always very kind, loving, caring and Claire is always my best friend (best friend forever). Love from Anabelle,” read the note.

Investigations are continuing.

Where to get help:

Life line: 0800 543354 (available 24/7)
Suicide Crisis Helpline: 0508 828 865 (0508 SUPPORT) (available 24/7)
Youth service: (06) 3555 906
Youthline: 0800 376 633
Kidsline: 0800 543754 (available 24/7)
What is wrong: 0800 942 8787 (13.00 to 23.00)
Depression helpline: 0800 111757 (available 24/7)
Rainbow Youth: (09) 376 4155
Suicide Prevention CASPER

If it’s an emergency and you think you or someone else is at risk, call 111.

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At 5.8 ° C, Karachi had another cold night of the season | Instant News


People in Karachi had a particularly cold night when mercury fell to another 5.8 degrees Celsius on Saturday morning, the Pakistan Meteorological Department said, adding that winter would continue for at least another week.

“Under the influence of the Siberian wind, the temperature fell to 5.8 ° C on Saturday morning,” said Chief Meteorological Officer Sindh Sardar Sarfaraz. “This is the second time the temperature has dropped below 6 ° C this month. On January 1, a minimum temperature of 5.8 ° C was recorded. “

Sarfaraz said that under the influence of the Siberian wind, the whole country was in the grip of the cold wind. Noting that the temperature had dropped below 6 ° C twice this month, he warned that winter would last in the city for at least another week.

He said the weather in Karachi is likely to remain cold and dry until January 15 or 16, with minimum temperatures ranging between 6 ° C and 9 ° C, adding that there is no chance of rain for at least the next two weeks.

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Switzerland- Toxic data: 40,000 cases of poisoning recorded in 2020 | Instant News


(MENAFN – Swissinfo) More than half of the cases reported last year involved children accidentally ingested poisonous substances. Overall, the number of cases rose 2% in 2019.

This content is published January 7, 2021 – 17:49 January 7, 2021 – 17:49 Keystone-SDA / dos

Approximately 40,000 cases of poisoning were recorded in 2020 by Tox Suisse Info External link organization, which has been providing advice – emergency and prevention – to citizens since 1966.

Of these, more than half (54%) involved children, most (84%) had not yet started school. Medicines (35.8%), household products (25.3%) and plants are responsible for nearly three-quarters of all cases.

Tox Info Suisse said, although cases involving children are generally accidents, the majority of adult problems stem from suicide attempts (69%) and substance abuse cases (14%).

Again, a large number of consultations (806) were offered to people who poisoned themselves with bad mushrooms. Mushroom-arisan is a popular Autumn activity in Switzerland, although not without (growing) danger .

Overall, Tox Info Suisse said, the number of consultations was up 2% in 2019; In contrast, the number of group site views jumped 28% to 645,000.

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