Tag Archives: Leisure and recreation (NEC) (TRBC level 5)

EU countries look to COVID passes to reopen summer travel | Instant News



FILE PHOTO: A couple are seen next to rows of empty hammocks during the coronavirus pandemic in Albufeira, Portugal July 20, 2020. REUTERS / Rafael MarchanteBRUSSELS (Reuters) – European Union countries officially agreed on Wednesday to launch COVID travel passes as a step towards reopening to tourism this summer and will negotiate details with bloc lawmakers in May, two diplomatic sources said. The certificates would allow people vaccinated, recovered from COVID-19 or with negative test results make it easier to travel in the EU, where restrictions on have weighed heavily on the travel and tourism industry for more than a year. The 27 EU member states “have underlined their commitment to have the framework ready by summer 2021,” said a document approved by national envoys and seen by Reuters. Parliament, which must also accept the proposal for it to take effect, is due to adopt its own position later this month and final talks between lawmakers, national envoys and the bloc’s executive are expected to start in May. EU countries are working in parallel to ensure “that the necessary technological solutions are in place,” says the EU27 decision, so that new digital or paper certificates can be used once approved. The Member States’ agreement includes provisions against discrimination against those who cannot or do not wish to be vaccinated and allows a series of tests to prove their recovery, while Member States would be obliged to recognize the vaccines approved by the EU, some countries might also issue certificates covering Sputnik vaccines from Russia or Sinovac from China which are only allowed in their territory, other EU countries would decide whether or not to accept a certificate referring a vaccine not approved by EU regulators.Report by Gabriela Baczynska; edited by Philip Blenkinsop.



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Mallorca steps up COVID testing to meet German travel rules | Instant News



By Guillermo Martinez, Ilona Wissenbach PALMA DE MAJORCA, Spain (Reuters) – Mallorca is scrambling to meet Germany’s new requirement that its citizens on vacation there test negative for the coronavirus before they return home, open cases test centers at the airport and in major hotels, and boost LABORATORY CAPACITY PHOTO: People queue in front of a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test site at Son Sant Joan airport in Palma de Mallorca , Spain, March 29, 2021. REUTERS / Guillermo Martinez opinion, is a test for Balearic authorities and private healthcare providers on the flexibility they need to demonstrate in the coming months for foreign tourists to arrive and book more vacations. But German tourists already in Mallorca are unhappy with the rule change, having already had to show a negative result to enter Spain. “The process of getting a test appointment cost us a day of our vacation, and the test several hours is quite complicated,” said German tourist Andreas, who did not give his name. of family. In tackling the outbreak of infections at home, Berlin on Monday introduced a requirement to test negative for all returnees to avoid importing more cases, soon after the mandatory quarantine was lifted. Bookings for travel to Mallorca continue to arrive, but not at the high levels seen immediately after Germany dropped a quarantine requirement, company spokesman Aage Dünhaupt said. already faces a long and uncertain road to recovery from the pandemic that devastated international travel. Foreign tourism to Spain fell 80% last year to 19 million visitors n half a century – and few people expect a return to pre-COVID levels before 2023. German tourists have to pay for the tests themselves. For those staying in larger hotels with a capacity of more than 100 people, private health companies are offering in-house testing, while others at smaller sites have to go to a private clinic. “I am here for the third time this year, but in the meantime it has become quite complicated,” complains Peter, another German returning home from the airport. Antoni Fuster of the Association of Private Healthcare Providers of the Balearic Islands said testing capacity was not an issue on the islands, but tourists should not leave the organization of a test to the last. minute. and 20,000 tests per day – for tourists and residents. An airport clinic, intended to be a last resort for travelers who show up without testing, had to double its capacity after long queues on Monday. a lot of demand and a lot of people complaining about the queues, ”said a spokesperson for Megalab, which operates the airport test center. Yet the bottleneck did not cause significant delays in flights, according to airport operator AENA. a returning tourist tests positive for COVID-19, they are either taken to a private hospital or to a hotel that has been set up to accommodate asymptomatic patients or mild cases. For tourists from the Schengen area, the government Spanish pass on the cost. of any forced stay in hospital in their home country, while the Balearic regional government pays the quarantine hotel.In Mallorca’s quarantine hotel – the Melia Palma Bay – there are 11 isolated people: two German tourists, a family from Croatia and five local residents, said the local health service. Report by Emma Pinedo and Nathan Allen in Madrid, Guillermo Martinez in Mallorca and Ilona Wissenbach and Maria Sheahan in Germany; Written by Nathan Allen; Edited by Alexandra Hudson.



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TUI to close 48 more stores in UK as travel crisis deepens | Instant News



A woman walks past the TUI Travel Center, amid the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, in Harpenden, Britain on March 24, 2021. REUTERS / Paul ChildsLONDON (Reuters) – The TUI holiday company has announced it would close 48 retail stores across Britain, in addition to the 166 it has already closed there during the pandemic. Store closures will mean additional savings for TUI, headquartered in Germany and who has relied on state bailouts to help it survive travel restrictions resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. “The travel industry and the UK high street are both facing unprecedented pressure. We can therefore confirm that we are proposing to close 48 retail stores, ”TUI said in a statement on Wednesday. across Europe are bracing for a second lost summer, which could mean a huge headache for TUI who, in its last update in February, said it already had 2.8 million bookings for this summer. be offered in its remaining 314 stores in the UK and Ireland, as well as its new Homework Team that responds to customer requests. To pass COVID-19, TUI said last year it would remove 8000 jobs and 30% of its costs. Sarah Young, edited by Paul Sandle.



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Analysis: COVID-19 setbacks in Europe risk another summer washout | Instant News



By Sarah Young, Laurence Frost LONDON / PARIS (Reuters) – European airlines and travel industry brace for lost second summer, with rebound hopes increasingly challenged by COVID-19 vaccine deployment hampered , the resurgence of infections and new lockdowns. Airlines and travel shares fell on Friday after shutting down Paris and much of northern France for a month, days after Italy introduced strong trade and movement restrictions for most of the country , including Rome and Milan. Setbacks have affected the recovery outlook for the crucial peak season, the profits of which typically push airlines up through the winter, when most carriers lose money even in good times. “If there is no confidence there, the demand just isn’t coming back,” said Dublin-based Alton. Aviation consultant Leah Ryan, who expects bad news about vaccines and lockdowns to hurt already low bookings.The summer outlook has also been affected by rising infections in Greece and elsewhere, and a suspension of the AstraZeneca vaccine by a number of European countries due to health concerns. . Several countries announced the resumption of use of the AstraZeneca bomb this week after the European Medicines Agency said the benefits clearly outweighed its risks. Airlines that have already racked up billions in debt are facing to additional stresses, as some may not survive without new funds. British Airways owner IAG on Thursday raised 1.2 billion euros ($ 1.43 billion) in a bond issue, saying the cushion would protect it from a protracted crisis. and Wizz Air, which can quickly redeploy planes between routes. But Ryanair’s domestic market expects to keep strict travel restrictions in place at least through June, Irish health official Ronan Glynn said on Thursday, citing the “deteriorating situation in the country.” international scale ”and the emergence of more contagious virus variants. IAG down 4% and easyJet and Wizz down 3.5%. Hopes of a rebound have pushed up travel inventories over the past month, driven by IAG’s 25% gain. While ultra-low-cost carriers may withstand another summer washout, analysts say rivals such that easyJet and Virgin Atlantic could face a renewed balance sheet. pressures. Air France-KLM is also seeking to raise capital and reduce debt from last year’s € 10.4 billion bailout. The Franco-Dutch airline group aims to fly more than 50% of its pre-crisis capacity this year, against 40 to 50% for Lufthansa – goals that could still prove to be ambitious. bankruptcies, especially by the end of the year, ”Alexandre de Juniac, head of the global aviation organization IATA, told Reuters. The latest boost in sentiment of recovery is spreading from airlines to hotel industries and the economy in general, penalizing Mediterranean countries dependent on tourism. . “The number of viruses is increasing, vaccine rollout is behind schedule and there is a risk that Europe will lose a second summer,” said Jacob Nell, economist at Morgan Stanley, predicting a “major blow to southern economies “. with optimistic messages from CEOs of US airlines, who this week reported an increase in spring and summer leisure bookings across the country, as the US vaccination campaign gained momentum and restrictions on coronavirus were relaxed. With its faster progress in vaccinations, the UK overseas market was seen as the key to the next peak season in Europe. But rising infection rates in Europe could also threaten those plans. Greece became the biggest source of imported cases from Britain when the countries opened a travel corridor last summer, according to an official British study released this week. Instead, the faster pace of vaccinations in Britain and the United States could lead to a transatlantic rebound – potentially overturning conventional wisdom that the short haul will recover first. “These two countries lead the G20,” with shots administered to 40% of the British population and a third in the United States, said UBS aviation analyst Jarrod Castle. “The North Atlantic could open up between (them) before other European markets, which would be very beneficial for British Airways.” ($ 1 = 0.8398 euros) Reporting by Sarah Young and Laurence Frost; Additional reporting by Conor Humphries in Dublin and Tracy Rucinski in Chicago; Editing by Susan Fenton and Bill Berkrot.



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British Airways calls on those vaccinated to travel without restrictions | Instant News



LONDON (Reuters) – The new British Airways boss said those vaccinated should be allowed to travel unrestricted and unvaccinated people with a negative COVID-19 test, as he set out his ideas for a travel restart an months before the UK government finalizes its Passengers are seen at the British Airways counter checking in for their flights to London at Benito Juarez International Airport, Mexico City, Mexico on December 21, 2020. REUTERS / Luis Cortes: Holidays will not be allowed until at the earliest May 17, the government said, but before that, on April 12, Britain will announce how and when non-essential travel to and from the country can resume. Sean Doyle, appointed chief executive of BA last October, called on Britain to work with other governments to allow vaccines and health applications to o open travel, after a year when the minimum number of flights left many airlines on life support. “I think people who have been vaccinated should be able to travel without restriction. Those who have not been vaccinated should be able to travel with a negative test result, ”he said. On April 12, he wants the government to provide support for health apps that can be used to check a person’s negative COVID-19 test results and immunization status.The apps will be essential in facilitating large-scale travel , said the industry. Airline staff checking paperwork takes 20 minutes per passenger and is impractical if a large number of passengers are returning. Britain has rapidly rolled out vaccinations and 44% of the adult population, mostly people over the age of 60 years old, have now had their first injection. any return to travel must be fair and not unduly disadvantage those who have not been vaccinated. Doyle expects Britain to introduce a tiered framework with destinations ranked according to risk, and this will determine BA’s summer program. Doyle declined to predict the strength of the season. Budget rival Ryanair, Europe’s largest airline, has said it hopes to fly up to 70% of passenger numbers in 2019 this summer. Travel commentators expect most European airlines to focus on short-haul leisure routes this summer, and Doyle noted France, Greece, Portu gal, Cyprus and Spain had all appeared positive about the reception of British holidaymakers, but said BA was also looking further. both long-haul and short-haul, ”said Doyle. ($ 1 = 0.7196 pounds) Reporting by Sarah Young. Edited by Mark Potter.



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