Tag Archives: Light

Exclusive-Brazil’s Light ready-to-use share offering worth more than 3 billion reais – source | Instant News


SAO PAULO (Reuters) – Brazilian power company Light SA is preparing to launch a stock offering of more than 3 billion reais ($ 570.80 million) in the coming days, two people with knowledge of the matter said.

The company will sell the new and existing shares in the offer, said the source, asking not to be named because the transaction has not been officially announced.

The light shareholder of Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais will seek the sale of all of its remaining 22.6% stake in the company, according to the sources. Cemig, as the company is called, has divested assets to pay off debts.

Light plans to use the proceeds from the main offering to reduce debt, the sources added.

Neither Light nor Cemig immediately commented on the matter.

Citi’s investment banking unit, BTG Pactual, Santander Brasil, Itau Unibanco and XP will manage the offer, sources added.

Light’s stock fell more than 70% in March as the coronavirus pandemic hit Brazil most intensely, but has since recovered and is trading now at roughly pre-pandemic levels.

($ 1 = 5,2558 reais)

Reporting by Carolina Mandl and Luciano Costa; Edited by Jan Harvey

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Exclusive-Brazil’s Light ready-to-use share offering worth more than 3 billion reais – source | Instant News


SAO PAULO (Reuters) – Brazilian power company Light SA is preparing to launch a stock offering of more than 3 billion reais ($ 570.80 million) in the coming days, two people with knowledge of the matter said.

The company will sell the new and existing shares in the offer, said the source, asking not to be named because the transaction has not been officially announced.

The light shareholder of Companhia Energetica de Minas Gerais will seek the sale of all of its remaining 22.6% stake in the company, according to the sources. Cemig, as the company is called, has divested assets to pay off debts.

Light plans to use the proceeds from the main offering to reduce debt, the sources added.

Neither Light nor Cemig immediately commented on the matter.

Citi’s investment banking unit, BTG Pactual, Santander Brasil, Itau Unibanco and XP will manage the offer, sources added.

Light’s stock fell more than 70% in March as the coronavirus pandemic hit Brazil most intensely, but has since recovered and is trading now at roughly pre-pandemic levels.

($ 1 = 5,2558 reais)

Reporting by Carolina Mandl and Luciano Costa; Edited by Jan Harvey

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New Year’s Awards 2021: The constellation of Kiwi stars shines brightly | Instant News


Get up, Sir Dave Dobbyn (left). Artists have been respected for music services for decades. Dame Anne Salmond (right) has been made a member of the Order of New Zealand. Photos / Files

The many people praised at this year’s New Year’s awards are not surprising – their names are well known.

One of them is a musician Dave Dobbyn, whose classics are well-known to many and will likely be on the playlists of many New Year’s gatherings tonight.

Dobbyn is one of four people who will become the Knight Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit.

READ MORE: New Year’s Awards: Full list

Then there is public health expert Professor Michael Baker who frequently appears in the news offering his expertise as the Covid-19 crisis hits New Zealanders throughout the year. Baker has been appointed a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for his services to public health sciences.

There are also names like Rob Fyfe, former chief executive of Air New Zealand, publisher Roger Steele, and Burton Shipley – husband of former Prime Minister Jenny Shipley.

However, there is another name that many people have never heard of. Many of the 154 people currently respected are not household names. Two people – members of the Defense Force – cannot even be named.

So far, the largest number of awards have been given for contributions to community, voluntary and local services.

They include men and women from every region of New Zealand.

On top of today’s awards were Maori health leaders and visionaries, Professor Emeritus Sir Mason Durie from Feilding, and Dame Anne Salmond from Auckland.

Both have been members of the New Zealand Order, joined by Richie McCaw and Helen Clark. Previous members include Sir Edmund Hillary and Dame Whina Cooper.

Sir Mason Durie is a recipient of the Order of New Zealand.  Photo / Provided
Sir Mason Durie is a recipient of the Order of New Zealand. Photo / Provided

Durie and Salmond have earned accolades in careers for decades. Their accomplishments cover many areas, and space quickly runs out when describing their work.

Salmond, a Pākehā who studied Te Reo Māori in the 1960s when it was far from being fashionable to do so, was a mold breaker.

Maybe Dobbyn too. Its musical output has spanned decades and different genres, providing soundtracks to some of Aotearoa’s brightest and darkest moments.

Dobbyn told the Herald that his famous 1986 hit song, Slice of Heaven, didn’t really belong anywhere when it was released.

Even though the song went against convention, Dobbyn remained confident.

“I know it’s a winner.”

Dan Salmond, who has praised his New Zealand colleagues, said our achievements as a country this year should make us all proud.

Defying the destroyers, the Kiwis of 2020 are determined to lock in, and embrace the concepts of kindness and aroha as a brutal pandemic looms.

That success made Salmond hope for around 2021.

“In many ways when I think about the future, I am very optimistic about what we can do here at Aotearoa.”

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Rise up Sir Dave, faithful knight

David Joseph Dobbyn, KNZM
For music services

Dave Dobbyn has been the Knight Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit at this year's New Years Awards.  Photo / Provided
Dave Dobbyn has been the Knight Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit at this year’s New Years Awards. Photo / Provided

Songwriter Dave Dobbyn thinks he’s at a loss for words. It’s not the glamor in Rhythm and Vines or the frantic rockstar lifestyle that baffles her.

He had just arrived from the motel in his van, he was sober and, nearly an hour before he played, he was chatting on the phone from a house near the Gisborne festival stage.

It was an upcoming knighthood title that confused him. Will his arm be cut off in an ancient royal ceremony? Will he be given war horse knights to replace the van?

“I don’t know what to say. It’s all new territory. I’m not really sure because I don’t believe what I’m reading. So I have to ask my wife to interpret it.”

Together with politician David Carter, broadcaster Ian Taylor and reo and tikanga professors William Te Rangiua Temara, Dobbyn will become a Knight Friend of the New Zealand Order of Merit.

That’s a wordy way of saying you can now call him Sir Dave.

Dobbyn said his children responded to the news with joy and appeared incredulous.

“Then I started ordering them – but it didn’t work.”

Dobbyn sounds like an old friend you meet after a few years, or your favorite uncle, who you only see once every few Christmas but immediately disarms you with hilarious anecdotes.

He said tonight he would be removed from the stage before 8pm like some “old man” the organizers didn’t want.

“They want to make us a cup of tea before 8.”

He joked that he would then be replaced with “doof-doof music” and the crowd waved their hands in the air.

For some boozers, this month is No Remember December. Last year, Dobbyn quit drinking during an alcohol-free cancer fundraising campaign called Dry July.

He’s stepped away from the turps, and 15 months later said throwing out alcohol was the best thing he’s ever done.

“You can finish sentences and structure them better and stop beating yourself up. I kind of hate who I am and how reactive I am and how insane I am.

“I limit myself to beer – it’s one way of trying to pretend I’m not a drinker or alcoholic. The whole circle of binge and drinking and so on, it just blocks the music.”

Many New Zealanders likely have a favorite Dave Dobbyn song, even if they don’t know.

Given her huge contributions over the decades (with Th ‘Dudes, with DD Smash, with Herbs, and during her solo career), you may hate some of her songs but adore others.

Without Dobbyn, there would be no Bliss, Be Mine Tonight, no Loyal, no Slice of Heaven, no Devil You Know, no Whaling.

For 40 years, he’s been interwoven with some of New Zealand’s most poignant and divisive moments.

She was blamed for inciting the Queen St riots. 1984, later cleared of error.

Loyal was used in an early 2000s America’s Cup campaign, in which New Zealanders were urged to buy a $ 10 car air flag of the same color.

In 2004, he joined musicians to raise money for the Algerian refugee family, Ahmed Zaoui.

After the Pike River tragedy, he recorded the tribute This Love with Orpheus Choir of Wellington and Wellington Young Voices in 2014.

Returning to R&V, Dobbyn says that writing a song drives it, just like the pursuit of happiness – in his words, creates something really great and makes people happy. He said the same chase prompted a craftsman to make custom furniture.

Wanting your creation to stand the test of time is one thing. But how do you know when you are successful? When Slice of Heaven was released in 1986, did he know how good it was?

Yes, that’s right, said Dobbyn without hesitation. He can feel it.

Other people can feel it too.

Da da da, this, this da da, this da da this, this, da da da.

Dobbyn says Slice of Heaven doesn’t fit into any of the prints. It stands out. He said one radio show host who had a selfish grudge refused to play it for six weeks. The song was in the trailer for the box-office smash hit Footrot Flats, and massive popular demand forced the DJ’s hand.

Dobbyn is playing at more festivals this summer and isn’t worried about going abroad any time soon.

He knows it is difficult to say how the global Covid-19 pandemic might have come and after hearing from relatives in California, he is in no rush to go to the United States.

“I would love to just play in New Zealand for the rest of my life. I get a lot of joy from him.”

Meanwhile, the desire for another slice of heaven motivated him, as did the smiles on people’s faces as they sang together.

“You always want a goal bigger than yourself.”

Optimistic scholars about New Zealand

Honorable Professor Dame Mary Anne Salmond, ONZ
For services to New Zealand

Dame Anne Salmond has been honored with the New Zealand Order.  Photo / Dean Purcell
Dame Anne Salmond has been honored with the New Zealand Order. Photo / Dean Purcell

Much of the world was unraveling when Dame Anne Salmond picked up the phone at her sanctuary outside Gisborne.

Covid-19 attacks dozens of countries, including many of the richest countries in the world. Some are in the third wave of mass death and chaos this year.

But anthropologists, historians and TV hosts are optimistic ahead of 2021.

Together with Professor Emeritus Sir Mason Durie, Salmond has become a member of the Order of New Zealand, the highest tier in the country’s royal awards system, where he will join forces with Richie McCaw, former prime minister and Murray Halberg.

Sure, he’s excited about the big New Year’s awards, but New Zealand’s response to the pandemic excited him.

Aotearoa is one of the few places where crowds can safely cheer up a fireworks or laser show, and where the next day, the red-eyed can dance and sing along at a festival.

Salmond said the country must consider how it can share its lessons with the rest of the world.

He said our ability to temper the neoliberal philosophy was one of the reasons New Zealand was successful this year, be it in assessing the epidemic or its economy.

“Since the 80s we have had a cult of economics towards individuals. In New Zealand we were very strong with that philosophy for a while and you see the effect it has on our current level of inequality. But at the same time, we ‘We always had fair values -Go very strong. “

Salmond also praised the Māori concept of aroha.

“Aroha is a beautiful concept because it is really about feeling fellow, caring for others. I think it’s about looking after other people but also taking care of other life systems and life forms.”

He said that a worldview benefits people not only during a pandemic, but can help us overcome the ecological crisis facing the world and 7.8 billion people today.

Over the years, the University of Auckland’s Professor of Maori Studies and Anthropology has been recognized for his work on intercultural understanding.

He seems genuinely interested in how to make this country better, and how learning te reo Māori can help us better understand the past, present and future.

Salmond said enthusiasm to learn te reo is now very important. It was a different story in the 1960s.

“When I was young and very fascinated by te reo and started studying it … it was not uncommon for Pākehā to be attracted to te reo or Māori tikanga or those things.

“In fact, it’s considered quite eccentric and not always great.”

Some fanatics, he said, harshly ignored Te Reo even though they knew so little about him.

But Pākehā culture is not static, and views about our native language have increased.

As Salmond and his Tairāwhiti neighbors prepare for the first rays of the sun in 2021, he hopes New Zealand can learn from this wild and brutal year and build a better future.

“In many ways when I think about the future, I am very optimistic about what we can do here at Aotearoa.”

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America’s Cup 2021: The boat will appear new because a gentle breeze is forecast for the third day of World Series races | Instant News


Sports|Cruise

Beyond the Cup: A breeze will rock the third day of America’s Cup racing

A breeze in Auckland this morning cast doubt on whether sailing would resume on the third day of racing in the America’s Cup World Series.

While Metservice is forecasting maximum gusts of 10 knots for Waitemata Harbor and Hauraki Bay this afternoon, with a possible period of lighter winds, current American Cup organizers are moving ahead with the race.

Racing is not possible if the wind speed does not exceed 6.5 knots and if conditions are slightly above the mark then sailing enthusiasts can be treated to a new look of the boat on the water.

In gentle breezes, the AC65 boat is expected to be carried to the water with the “Code Zero” headgear, an adaptation specially designed for these kinds of days.

“This could potentially be the first time we’ve seen large Code Zero headails flown from the bowsprit to generate enough power in a gentle breeze,” AUT Sailing Professor Mark Orams told NZME on Saturday morning.

Te Rehutai flies the Code Zero screen during practice ahead of the America's Cup World Series.  Photos / Photosport
Te Rehutai flies the Code Zero screen during practice ahead of the America’s Cup World Series. Photos / Photosport

There was speculation this morning that the lighting conditions would force organizers to shift the race to a less fan-friendly track, but the same track as the opening two days of the race, C, will return to use today.

Several major locations to see line C are Bastion Point and Okahu Bay Wharf.

Enjoy a smooth sailing to the Cup with Auckland Transport

• Avoid traffic jams and parking distractions and download the AT Mobile app to plan your bus, train or ferry trip to the racetrack before you leave home.

• Make sure your AT HOP card is in your pocket. That’s the best way to move up to the Cup

• For more ways to enjoy race day, visit at.govt.nz/americascup

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KMC fixes the roads, lights the way | Instant News


At the direction of Karachi Administrator and Commissioner Iftikhar Ali Shallwani, Karachi Metropolitan Corporation (KMC) has made all the street lights around the Karachi National Stadium functioning and replaced the ones that were not working.

According to a press statement issued by the KMC on Saturday, administrators have asked officials to take special measures during the Pakistan Super League (PSL) playoff game. Dilapidated roads had to be built and walkways painted, he said.

Beauty and cleaning work is ongoing around the stadium which is good for foreign players. “This is the first major tournament after the Covid-19 outbreak and the holding of the PSL match in Karachi is very welcome. Karachi people love cricket, “he added.

KMC Public Works Director Shabeeh ul Hassan said that they are liaising with the Pakistan Cricket Board and providing all facilities for the tournament.

Meanwhile, according to a press statement from the Sindh Waste Management Agency (SSWMB), the cleaning arrangements for the PSL match have been completed.

A squad of cleaning workers has taken responsibility for cleanliness inside and outside the National Stadium. Until the end of the match, SSWMB staff will continue to carry out their duties, while on major highways, such as Sharea Faisal, Clifton, near the airport, Karsaz Road, Stadium Road, Dalmia Road, Drig Road, University Road, Hassan Square work, mechanical sweeping and washing will be continues.

At the direction of SSWMB MD Zubair Channa, Chinese contractors have been advised to use more engines due to PSL matches. The management of the Malir, South and East districts has been advised by Channa to ensure cleanliness.

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