Tag Archives: Like it

Abused youth recounts time in Rangipo Prison: ‘Like nothing else on Earth’ | Instant News


Stanmore Road Boys’ Home in Christchurch ‘is kind of a violent place’ but what’s worse is coming for a man who has shared his experiences with RNZ. Photo / 123rf

By Andrew McRae for RNZ

One man who came through state care at an orphanage, boys’ home, corrective training and finally prison, believes his life has been pushed back by at least 30 years by the way he was treated and the physical and psychological abuse he endured.

Aaron, who is 50 years old, comes from a broken home and his interview with RNZ is the first time he has spoken publicly about his experiences in care.

He lived on the streets for a year at the age of 9.

Aaron ended up at Stanmore Road Boys’ Home in Christchurch at 13 o’clock.

Her stepfather beat her if she made a mistake and one day she stood up and beat her back. The police were called and Aaron was sent to Stanmore.

One of his first memories of being at a boy’s house was seeing a drug addict using a syringe. “ It’s kind of a violent place. ”

He said those who run the house put one of the older boys in charge, as a kingpin to fire shots.

“Anyone who doesn’t do what he wants or behaves badly, he will make other people beat them. That’s perfectly normal. ”

She said she was never sexually assaulted like some of the other men in the house at the same time, but there was a lot of physical abuse.

Aaron was sent back to the Stanmore Road home when he was 14 or 15 after fighting and assaulting someone.

At the age of 16 he was sent to Rangipo Prison (now Tongariro Prison) for three months on the central North Island for what was then called corrective training.

A place of constant violence

He described it as the worst place he had ever been. “ That’s so unreal. ”

He was sure that all of the officers were former soldiers.

He said prisoners were forced to run all over the place and work in the forestry blocks and there was a lot of violence – “heaps, all the time”. “

“ You will not look at a prison officer, you will only be punched.

“ I had officers beat me, choke me, do dirty tricks like inserting a fire hose through my window in the middle of the night and then turning it on. ”

There is "pile" violence at Rangipo Prison Plantation on central North Island, said a former convict who was only 16 years old when he went there.  Photo / National Library of New Zealand
There was a “heap” of violence at Rangipo Prison Farm on central North Island, said a former inmate who was only 16 years old when he went there. Photo / National Library of New Zealand

He said the inmates had to do a 20 km run every weekend and although he was lucky to be fit, others were not so lucky.

” You will get a new person there and he will not know what the way is and they will not be fit and decide to get into the truck with the runners – big mistake.

In the back of the truck there are always half a dozen officers there smoking drugs, so whoever gets into the truck is beaten and kicked out about 60 seconds later.

“ They would be covered in blood and we sometimes helped them get up and other times we were forced to do push-ups when they got together and started running again, but they ran away after that, ” he said.

Self-harm is an option

Aaron said some inmates were taking bold action to leave Rangipo. This includes injuring yourself for transfer.

“People try to break their arms all the time or break bones because if you can’t work there, you can’t stay there and you have to go to the main prison.

“ I saw a friend, a good Māori boy, he had to work first, jumped out of the truck first and took the ax used to cut the bushes in the forest and walked behind the bush and cut off his leg, telling boss that he slipped with an ax.

“ His boots are flapping and he has cut off quite a bit of the toe. ”

He said the inmates would fight amongst themselves but if they were caught, they ended up being beaten up by “ some screws ” (prison officials).

At the age of 18, Aaron was convicted on a range of charges including murder, assault and grievous physical assault and sentenced to eight and a half years in prison.

He is serving a five-and-a-half year sentence but says three months in Rangipo is much more difficult.

“ Before going to Rangipo, I thought I was lucky enough to live on the streets when I was 9 or 10 years old because it made it difficult for me. ”

Prison opportunity ‘to find out’

He was 24 years old when he was released from prison and has since tried to stay straight and narrow.

“ Maybe, to me, prison is what I need because it gives me time to stop and start thinking about it. ”

She married shortly thereafter and moved to Australia to work as a diamond driller and in mining.

He returned to New Zealand and studied adult building apprenticeship and now has his own building company that employs people.

“ Many people who know me will not know about my past. ”

Prepare both of them to fail and overcome them

Aaron is thinking of telling his story to the Royal Commission in Abuse in Care.

“ The system in some ways prepared me for a life of failure, but it also set me up to cope in other ways too, for some of the things I was going through.

“ I think the main thing in my life that probably impacted the most was three months in Rangipo. It was truly like no other place on Earth.

“ I saw people who were with me in Rangipo and of course they are victims and they have had other victims and I think it’s just a vicious circle and it has to stop somewhere. ”

He said the time in Rangipo only made them harder, which did not benefit them or their family or community.

“ I don’t know if what happened can be fixed. There are still things in my life that I do and sometimes I have to like to open them up and say: ‘That’s not really what I want to do and not what I want’.

“ Sometimes I have to hold back because some of those things can happen naturally and you don’t even notice it before you’re halfway through.

“There is a lot of hope for the next generation which is certain but it must start now. ”

Where to get help:

• Lifeline: 0800 543354 (available 24/7)
Suicide Crisis Helpline: 0508 828 865 (0508 SUPPORT) (available 24/7)
• Youth services: (06) 3555 906
• Youthline: 0800 376 633
• Kidsline: 0800 543 754 (available 24/7)
Whatsup: 0800 942 8787 (13.00 to 23.00)
Depression helpline: 0800 111 757 (available 24/7)
• Rainbow Youth: (09) 376 4155
• Helpline: 1737

If it’s an emergency and you think you or someone else is at risk, call 111.

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Switzerland- Alpine Exposure: how good are our survival tactics? | Instant News


(MENAFN – Swissinfo)

What did the locked Alps mountains look like during one of the coldest and whitest January in recent memory? Amazing and very crowded.

This content is published on 4 February 2021 – 16:00 February 4 2021 – 16:00 Dale Bechtel

Dale started his career at Swiss Radio International, the predecessor of SWI swissinfo.ch, in the 1990s. He reports on everything and whatever is happening in the Swiss Alps, from politics and climate change to tourism.

More on the author | Editorial Board

While employers are urged to order their employees to work from home, many include you literally sneaking out the door and into the hills on the weekends – whether to tie up Nordic or Alpine skis, or snowshoes.

We can’t help ourselves. In valleys in the eastern part of the country, snow falls up to one meter in the middle of the moon, and even more in the mountains – between 60cm and 1.7m. The snow keeps falling thanks to the temperature that remains stable below freezing. It makes me miss the long Canadian winters of my youth.

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List! Move the mountain, and the story, into your box

Email address Letters from the Alps

The good times, like all good things, must come to an end. Last week the steep slopes along the Swiss Alps started shedding their thick coats. The avalanche, or the threat of it, blocked roads and cut through villages including Zermatt, which, like other ski resorts across Switzerland, has counted the blessings of being allowed to keep its lifts running even though it has been locked.

swissinfo.ch

As we enter February, the blistering cool temperatures and incessant rain keeps us indoors, and makes us wonder what more surprises this winter might have.

Looks like it won’t be there anymore. Cold and snowy periods are few and far between as shown in this time-lapse video. The temperature in the Alps – with few exceptions – has risen since measurements were first recorded in 1865.

This increase is slowly changing the ecosystem of the Alps. During the winter months of January, researchers rang warning bells about the threat posed by a warming climate to the survival of one of the most violent inhabitants of the mountainous community, Swiss stone pine (pine cembra).

Living to 500 years, the Swiss rock pine stands apart from its more common siblings, the silver spruce and the spruce. Because it grows so slowly, it is short by comparison, and is often gnarled and twisted by the harsher climates in the upper tree line to which it is well adapted. Researchers from the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research at WSL, now say that it could disappear from below.

By analyzing more than 3,000 genes from seedlings and mature trees in the high and lowlands, they found that young trees in the lowlands lacked the genetic makeup to survive warmer, drier climates. Depletion of stony pine stands can harm other living things that depend on them – the Spotted Nut Crushers which scatter their seeds and a variety of insects, lichens and fungi.

It is not yet known whether the Davos man going extinct, but he failed his annual appearance in the Alps this year. The pandemic forced the World Economic Forum to cancel its annual meeting in Davos, instead holding a meeting of political and business leaders online.

The WEF intends to shift face-to-face events to Singapore in August. It made me wonder if the Davos man would miss the Alps and be nostalgic against the snowy backdrop he occasionally sees from the conference room window. But I will ask that question. If you’re reading my recent article, you know that I’ve been thinking long and hard about nostalgia. The third and final episode of the nostalgic series I created as part of the podcast The Swiss Connection is now available. If you listen, you’ll hear why nostalgic waxing can be so empowering. I would love to hear about your own memories and nostalgia for the Alps.

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Best New Zealand Beaches 2021: Winner reveals Ōhope, Bay of Plenty | Instant News


Roll up a beach towel, pick up picnic scraps, and toss melted ice from the trash onto the grass. The votes have been counted and our search for the Best Beaches in Aotearoa has been finished and cleared, like sand from wet clothes.

It’s time to name the winners of the readers’ 10 favorite beaches and the three wildcards the Travel Herald team added to the short list.

New Zealand’s Best Beaches 2021 are Ōstreet, almost beating our 2018 contest winner Whangamatā.

Why does Ōhope’s fan club rate the 11km-long Bay of Plenty sand as the best beach in the country?

Three reasons keep popping up in our readers’ replies: space, safety and family fun.

Ōhope Beach, in the Bay of Plenty - New Zealand's Best Beaches for 2021. Photo / Getty Images
Ōhope Beach, in the Bay of Plenty – New Zealand’s Best Beaches for 2021. Photo / Getty Images

Robin makes the key points: “Safe. Very gradual incline. Perfect for body surfing. Facing north. Pacific. Offshore island. Seaside playground. Spacious Pōhutukawas perfect for hiking. Shop selling ice cream. Everything you want. “

The place also has a unique charm. For some readers, pet friendly is one. “It’s the perfect beach for dogs. No matter the tide, there’s always room for the dog to run and play, the gentle slopes are perfect for dogs of any size to chase sticks in the water … There are plenty of other dogs to make friends with but not too crowded … you can walk for hours, depending on your dog’s sporting needs, “wrote Kate Campbell, who lived there most of her life.

As we’ve noted throughout the series, seaside cooking is a deal breaker. Em Rampling agrees – “Great choice of food from fish ‘n’ chips to fine dining” – like Katrina Elder, loves the “sunniest, most surfed, friendliest and tastiest (fish and chips) beach in the country.”

Ōhope Beach, with Ōhiwa Harbor on the other side of the spit, in the Eastern Bay of Plenty.  Photo / Provided
Ōhope Beach, with Ōhiwa Harbor on the other side of the spit, in the Eastern Bay of Plenty. Photo / Provided

For Simon Stokes, there’s history: “It’s still the beach way it used to be – fun, family and freedom. This was also possibly the first beach our early Polynesian sailors walked.”

As well as water activities, Lara Dixon values ​​wildlife: “Shellfish gathering, driftwood huts, cycling, NZ birds and sometimes even sea lions. Home to NZ fauna, and people, with spectacular views of the East Cape and rolling mountains and sea for miles. -mil. “

Jos van de Laar added the daytime bonus – “He enjoys more sunshine than the whole country almost every year” – while Rachel Gilden likes the twilight zone: “It has the most spectacular sunsets.”

Ōhope Beach, favorite of all ages.  Photo / Provided
Ōhope Beach, favorite of all ages. Photo / Provided

Some visitors enjoy meeting the lucky people who live there: “It’s mostly the friendly locals who stop by and chat when you meet them on the beach,” wrote Julie Jukes.

A final word for Abby Tozer, who reminds us that the beautiful Kiwi coast is a place to share. “This place welcomes surfers and kids and cool families and teenagers and kite riders and fishermen and people in wheelchairs and paddle boards and everyone – you can come and enjoy.”

The best of the rest

The other 12 beaches on our finalist list received lots of love. We won’t rank the others from the list, but here’s a selection of why readers find them quite special. There is still plenty of summer left for you to see for yourself:

Whangamatā

The popular Whangamatā Coromandel remains a reader’s favorite. For Dennis Wiley, it’s “great, consistent surf on a relatively safe beach without dangerous rips. Beautiful soft white sand. Beautiful, curvy beach with a harbor at the north end and an estuary at the south end both of which provide the option for families to swim if the waves are gone.

“It’s idyllic with two islands just off the main coast and scenic headlands at either end of the beach … Home to the world-class Whangamatā Bar, a unique left-hand surfing spot near the harbor entrance … great boating and fishing from safe harbor, “and a two-hour drive from Auckland or Hamilton makes it accessible to most New Zealanders, he said with enthusiasm.

For many, Whangamatā has the feel of a Hotel California: you can check out any time but you never really leave.

Whangamatā - loved by many Kiwis and our previous winner of Best Beach in 2018.Photo / Provided
Whangamatā – loved by many Kiwis and our previous winner of Best Beach in 2018.Photo / Provided

“We’ve been vacationing here since I was a teenager and now our daughters have them too. Love the beach – and the choice of where we can go. The surf beach, harbor, estuary or Grandma’s Beach, is named because when we were teenagers that was where our mothers went! The sight keeps me excited, “mused Jo Brooks.

Kyla Hughes is a little more sentimental: “I cried on that beach. Laughed on that beach. And grew up on that beach. Wherever I go, I always compare it.”

Christine Robertson takes a long-term view: “Its beautiful white sand, friendly people and excellent cafe make it a top destination on the Coromandel. E-bikes cruising the streets and the once-a-year Beach Hop are a highlight for NZ rockers young and old alike. . Our lifeguards keep us safe all summer long and the weather is tropical most of the year. If you want to wake up in paradise every day, make Whangamatā your home. “

Maitai Bay

“Pure white sand, crystal clear water, protected swimming area. Fantastic beach combing, awesome rockpooling at low tide. Best of all, except during peak season, it’s a bit lonely.” – Weigh Rebecca

Sorry

“Plenty of bach, nothing there but old-fashioned dairy selling the greatest ice cream and fish chips, great safe beach with fun for all ages, awesome boogie boarding waves, surf surf at the other end, amazing estuary acting like a lazy river at high tide, two rivers for kayaking. “- Tracey Day

Wainui

“Wainui not only welcomes the sun before anywhere else in New Zealand, but it also has a fun and nurturing community, great surf and beautiful clear water. There is a rock pool at each end with interesting creatures. Okitu’s shop has summer treats. which is very good. ” – Shona Blaylock

Matarangi

A stunning 5km long white sandy beach where families gather for picnics and BBQs, kids spend hours digging sandcastles to hunt for the perfect shell and couples bathe in the sun. Swim in clear, brilliant seas for all ages and abilities with gentle waves and warm water as you pass over hot flat sand… Collect old gnats, clams and mussels or throw your stick off the beach to catch a snapper of a lifetime … New Zealand paradise … a very special one. “- Susi Matz

The white sand of Matarangi Beach.  Photo / Getty Images
The white sand of Matarangi Beach. Photo / Getty Images

If there’s one thing Kiwis are mad about, it’s their beaches. Here are some beaches that are not on our list, but that are receiving lots of love from around the country:

Ruakākā, Northland: “Soft white sand and pristine clear water that stretches for miles make this our favorite beach. Ice cream at Chilly Bin after a day in the sun is an added bonus.”

Tāwharanui, Auckland: “One of the prettiest beaches in NZ. It also has grassy, ​​shaded areas, large rock pools, great safe surfing, eco-walking trails known for their amazing bird and bush life. Have visited beaches all over NZ, and no one can come close to this combination of features. “

Karekare, Waitakere: “Despite being close to Auckland, this moody beach feels isolated from the outside world. On sunny days it is beautiful and pleasant. Almost every day it is quiet, a place of solitude and peace. Finally, nature often reminds you of its immensity. and his tantrums as he releases the power of his anger. Karekare is a beach that offers what you are looking for, but on the terms of nature. “

Hahei, Coromandel: “Beautiful soft white sand with pōhutakawa lining the dunes, the best Kiwi beaches. Well protected sea means year round swimming for all ages, and the sun shines all day. Very close to the popular Cathedral Cove too.”

Waikanae, Kapiti: “As it is a long beach with beautiful white sand, the scenery is stunning, the temperature is usually warmer and more pleasant than Wellington and the water makes for great surf.”

New Brighton, Christchurch: “The sun rises every day and ‘enlightens’ our hearts. It has room for everyone… beach trails, swimming and surfing, docks, and views. It has a new water park and new saltwater hot tubs … Kiwi as. “

Doctors Point, Dunedin: “Peaceful, beautiful, and birdsong. Safe water for kids to learn water skills and great dog walks.”

Awaroa, Tasman: “Beautiful sandy beach, very blue water! And its remote location makes it very special.” What’s special: Kiwis raised $ 2.8 million to buy this slice of heaven from private ownership in 2016. Where better to end the series?

Awaroa - Kiwis pick this one with their wallets.  Photo / Provided
Awaroa – Kiwis pick this one with their wallets. Photo / Provided

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Switzerland- Three female directors win at the Solothurn Film Festival | Instant News


(MENAFN – Swissinfo) Swiss film director Andrea Štaka has won the top prize at the Solothurn Film Festival with Mare, ‘a feature film that looks like a documentary or reality itself’, according to the jury.

This content is published January 27, 2021 – 13:13 January 27, 2021 – 13:13 Keystone-SDA / ts

In his third feature film, the Zurich-based filmmaker tells the story of Mare, a wife and mother in Croatia whose emotional world is shaken when she meets a younger man. Mare made his debut at the Berlinale last year; Its theatrical release in Switzerland was interrupted by the closure and the jury hoped the film would get a “new chance on the big screen”.

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As part of the 56th Solothurn Film Festival, which is held online, Mare has been nominated for the 2021 Swiss Film Awards in three categories (Best Feature Film, Best Screenplay and Best Voice). The grand prize, the Prix de Soleure, is valued at CHF60,000 ($ 68,000).

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Legal Disclaimer: MENAFN provides information “as is” without warranty of any kind. We are not responsible or liable for the accuracy, content, images, videos, licenses, completeness, legality or reliability of the information contained in this article. If you have a complaint or copyright issue related to this article, please contact the provider above.

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Switzerland- Three female directors win at the Solothurn Film Festival | Instant News


(MENAFN – Swissinfo) Swiss film director Andrea Štaka has won the top prize at the Solothurn Film Festival with Mare, ‘a feature film that looks like a documentary or reality itself’, according to the jury.

This content is published January 27, 2021 – 13:13 January 27, 2021 – 13:13 Keystone-SDA / ts

In his third feature film, the Zurich-based filmmaker tells the story of Mare, a wife and mother in Croatia whose emotional world is shaken when she meets a younger man. Mare made his debut at the Berlinale last year; Its theatrical release in Switzerland was interrupted by the closure and the jury hoped the film would get a “new chance on the big screen”.

External Content

As part of the 56th Solothurn Film Festival, which is held online, Mare has been nominated for the 2021 Swiss Film Awards in three categories (Best Feature Film, Best Screenplay and Best Voice). The grand prize, the Prix de Soleure, is valued at CHF60,000 ($ 68,000).

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MENAFN27012021000210011054ID1101505226

Legal Disclaimer: MENAFN provides information “as is” without warranty of any kind. We are not responsible or liable for the accuracy, content, images, videos, licenses, completeness, legality or reliability of the information contained in this article. If you have a complaint or copyright issue related to this article, please contact the provider above.

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