Tag Archives: living

Travel and tourism brands drive marketing and tailor messaging | Instant News



A new ad from Expedia will launch the online travel agency’s costliest brand marketing effort in five years today. In the ad, actress Rashida Jones portrays Expedia as the companion of a woman traveling alone in a foreign country. Ms Jones transforms the traveller’s dismal hotel room into a bigger, nicer space with the snap of her fingers and helps her out of a precarious situation involving women taking selfies. The marketing effort, which also includes the introduction of new travel insurance and route planning products, was inspired by research showing not only growing demand for travel as pandemic restrictions decrease. , but also the desire of consumers for travel agencies to provide more than offers. said Shiv Singh, senior vice president and general manager of Expedia, a unit of Expedia Group Inc. “The travel space in some ways was more transaction-oriented. This is where you find the best deal, you go for the cheapest ticket, ”Singh said. “It has changed now. People think of value differently. Expedia’s campaign won’t be the only one: TV commercials promoting travel websites have more than doubled in the 50 days ended April 12, compared to the previous 50 days, according to the company. iSpot.tv media measurement. Other travel and tourism marketers are also stepping up their marketing as the industry moves to reassert itself after a year of lockdowns and movement limits. They re-evaluate and recalibrate their pitches in the process. Some brands deliver messages about safe collection, while others focus on promotional ads that feature offers. CMO Today Newsletter Sign-Up CMO Today delivers the most important news of the day to media and marketing professionals. “Over the past 13 months we’ve seen an unprecedented reduction in advertising budgets in the travel industry,” said Kevin Kopelman, analyst at financial services firm Cowen, which covers travel agencies in line and hotels. But a recent surge in demand has led travel companies to ramp up their marketing spend – although not necessarily to pre-pandemic levels – while strategically thinking about setting the right tone for their message, Kopelman said. An Expedia Group Vrbo campaign that began operating in December, for example, encourages families to come together again without mentioning the pandemic that has separated so many. For families stuck at home during the pandemic, on the other hand, Universal Orlando Resort has a 40% off commercial offer to entice them. Expedia described its new marketing push as a change from its messaging in recent months, when it tried to set a more inspiring tone. A cheerful TV commercial that aired in March showed a lively couple whose furniture turns into travel experiences. Marriott International Inc. spent the first quarter of this year posting content on social media designed to inspire consumers to dream of travel and running automated digital ads to capitalize on any new demand. The company will now focus on brand marketing which can increase demand, said Brian Povinelli, senior vice president of brand, loyalty and portfolio marketing at Marriott International. “More than ever, the past 12 months have challenged us to be much more flexible and agile in our marketing approach and execution,” Povinelli said in an email. Travel and tourism brands, such as popular U.S. tourist destinations, are eager to get travelers spending money again, said Alex Leikikh, global managing director of MullenLowe Group, an Interpublic Group of Cos advertising agency network. who works with a number of travel marketers including JetBlue Airways Corp., Royal Caribbean International and Wyndham Hotels & Resorts Inc. “These industries and the destinations and hotels in these states – they’ve been suffering badly for 12-14 months and need income now, ”said Leikikh. Promotions that feature deals can generate income while building brands over time, especially with “a boost from government and people returning to work,” he said. Some tourism and entertainment organizations are looking at agencies that can meet their advertising or media needs. The Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority and Visit California are currently in the process of hiring new agencies, according to people familiar with the matter. Concert giant Live Nation is also leading a process to hire an agency capable of handling its $ 130 million media account, people familiar with the matter said. “Everyone’s trying to figure out how to enter the market first with the right message,” said Casey Burnett, managing partner and founder of agency research and marketing consulting firm Burnett Collective. “It’s all about market share.” Write to Alexandra Bruell at [email protected] Copyright © 2020 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All rights reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8.



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Time for accounts: remote work, travel and home reality | Instant News



While some workers are starting to return to the office this year, others have been given the opportunity to work from home indefinitely. Twitter TWTR, -2.22%, Dropbox DBX, + 0.04%, NerdWallet and many other tech companies will allow employees to move completely or almost completely remotely, freeing them from commutes and crowded elevators. Yet what are the travel options and the realities if you are now working remotely? Should you become a digital nomad? Moving to a new city or staying put? Is it really possible to work in a hammock on the beach, or does it get uncomfortable? Many new remote workers are excited and overwhelmed by the options. Here we outline five important considerations to keep in mind when taking the next step to working remotely while traveling (or not). Should you stay or go? If your job is far away, are you automatically a digital nomad? Not necessarily. Typically, digital nomads don’t have a specific home and bounce from place to place in search of cheap accommodation and fast Wi-Fi. As a digital nomad myself, I can tell you that most of us spend uninstagrammable time in our parents’ house. See: Digital nomads don’t sit on the beach or travel all the time – this is what life really looks like One of the first things to consider once your job gets distant is where you want to live and how often you want to travel. At one end of the spectrum is complete digital nomadism. On the other hand, stay exactly where you are. And in between are a myriad of hybrid options, including: Slow-madism: Rather than constantly moving, some remote workers take longer, spending long periods in each location. This can be a great way to start, as it allows you to explore and get to know the pace of life in each destination. Home base: Even remote workers who call themselves “digital nomads” often have a home base to return to between trips. This offers some convenience, but also a lot of potential expense. Snowbirding: Although generally attributed to well-tanned retirees, the term “snowbird” refers to anyone who migrates to warmer climates for the winter. Whether it’s getting off in a motorhome or catching a flight to Mexico, this is an attractive option for remote workers looking for vitamin D. The big challenge with each option is to find a balance between quality of life and costs. For example, keeping a household base means you can keep your stuff, but it can also get expensive. And renting furnished accommodation as a nomad can be more expensive than you might think. Each situation is unique. If you already own your home, you may be able to use it as a base of residence and rent it while traveling. If you are renting, you may need to stay put or move out completely. Get out the spreadsheets, get creative, and set a budget that works for you. What about taxes? It’s not the most exciting aspect of working remotely, but taxes are an important and often overlooked factor in deciding where and how to live. Local and state taxes differ so much that they can affect the cost of living in a particular area just as much as the cost of transportation or housing. For example, the cost of living in Minneapolis and Austin, Texas is roughly equal, according to NerdWallet’s calculator. Yet that ignores state income tax, which runs at 6.8% in Minnesota for an individual earning $ 100,000 per year and 0% in Texas. That’s a difference of $ 6,800 per year, or $ 566 per month, enough to have a significant impact on your budget. Additionally, the tax rules for nomads bouncing between locations are extremely complex, varying from state to state. Be sure to consult a tax professional if you plan to work in many states in a single year. Can you live abroad? Living on the beach in Thailand has been the dream of digital nomads for decades, but can you swing it? And you want it? The biggest advantage of living in another country is the reduction in the cost of living. After enjoying a banh mi in Ho Chi Minh City for $ 1, it’s hard to get back to US prices. And for those who can earn a salary in the United States, living elsewhere can be a financial dream come true. Yet working remotely while traveling abroad comes with many complexities and important considerations. From tax rules (which vary by country) to visa considerations, it’s not as easy as packing a bag and leaving the country. Also, your job might not allow it. Be sure to check with your HR team before you expatriate, as many companies require their employees to stay in certain countries for administrative reasons. Plus, it can be difficult to work collaboratively when you are 12 hours ahead of your coworkers. Should you move to a cheaper location? Zillow Z, -4.80% of surfing is the waste of time of the day. For workers who have been stranded in expensive cities because of their work, it can be tempting to see how much you could afford in other cities. “If we move to Akron, we can buy a mansion!” Plus: The 10 Best US Cities for Remote Workers in 2021 But don’t let the cost of housing guide your entire decision. Usually, cheaper places are cheaper for a reason, and buying a dream home in a random city isn’t necessarily a recipe for happiness. Consider spending time as “lazy” in a cheap city before settling there. What do you like? This is the last consideration on our list, but it really is the most important. Remote working offers options, and which option you choose will depend on what you enjoy. Do you want to be close to the family? Or to friends? Do you want to live on the cheap and retire early? Or do you want to make the most of the money you earn now and live in a vibrant, vibrant city? Related: Where’s Your Best Place to Live? Ask yourself these questions to find out. Many people never have to face these questions. They just live close to their work and get the most out of it. Shifting to a distant mindset can – and should – prompt tough questions about what matters to you and how you will build your life to maximize those values. Remember: very few decisions are permanent and you can always try something new and turn the tide. Try experimenting one variable at a time (for example, if you want to keep a permanent home) and see what works and what doesn’t. See also: Best Places to Live in America in 2020 The End Result The pandemic has changed many aspects of daily life, from the mundane to the monumental. And if your job has given you the opportunity to work from home permanently, you have the opportunity to change the very structure of your life – or not. Learn more: What to pack and what to leave behind if you want to be a digital nomad. Romantic notions of working remotely while traveling aside, there are several important financial considerations to keep in mind when planning your next step. If you want to travel more, make sure you don’t pay the rent or mortgage twice at home. Make sure you understand the tax implications whether you are staying in the United States or moving abroad. Don’t let the cost of living dictate your entire decision and be sure to maximize your personal values. More from NerdWallet Sam Kemmis writes for NerdWallet. Email: [email protected] Twitter: @samsambutdif. .



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Travel boom is coming, Expedia CEO says: ‘Hotels are going to scream back’ | Instant News



Peter Kern became CEO of Expedia Group Inc. last April, during the travel industry’s worst crisis in decades. It was a precarious time: Calls to the company’s call centers had jumped 500%, with consumers canceling flights and hotel rooms. Expedia burned money by issuing refunds. To deal with the recession, he struggled to raise about $ 4 billion in capital last spring. Expedia has had problems pre-pandemic. A strategic clash between its board and management led to the resignation of Expedia’s CEO and CFO in December 2019. Barry Diller, chairman of the company, called Expedia “sclera and bloated” as he was struggling to compete with the growing Google presence in the travel booking industry. He enlisted Mr Kern, a 52-year-old vice president of Expedia and longtime head of media and private equity, to help him run the day-to-day operations of Expedia before appointing him CEO at last spring. Mr. Kern has sought to simplify the structure of the company and make his business less reliant on Google search. While shedding thousands of jobs, the company is also gearing up for an expected rebound in travel. Along with the Expedia brand, the company owns Orbitz and Travelocity, as well as Vrbo, a rival of Airbnb Inc. which benefited from travelers’ desire to rent homes during the pandemic. Mr. Kern recently spoke with The Wall Street Journal by phone from a home office in Wyoming. Here are edited excerpts :.



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These technologies could hold back business travel indefinitely | Instant News



It’s a sunny, windy morning in Eugene, Ore., A place best known for its access to the great outdoors, its history of environmental activism, and Nike’s birthplace. I stand outside an indescribable one-story industrial space, speaking with Mark Frohnmayer, Managing Director of Arcimoto, maker of a three-wheeled electric vehicle he calls a “fun utility vehicle.” Only, I’m not in Oregon. I’m still stuck at home on the opposite coast, relying – like many of us – on an ever-expanding array of tools that allow me to do my work remotely. In this case, I’m doing a tour of the Arcimoto factory via FaceTime. Mr. Frohnmayer carries me to an iPhone, shows me things, brings me closer to half-finished machines, parts and vehicles, and answers my questions. To me, this turns out to be a reasonable facsimile of my presence. Minus the eight hour flight and stay at a discounted Dow Jones approved hotel with continental breakfast, ie. This is how Mr. Frohnmayer and his team have been organizing factory visits to investors, customers and suppliers since the start of the pandemic. It works well enough that Mr Frohnmayer wanted to continue doing it after the pandemic is over, as it does not result in any loss of productivity due to days of travel. Through cloud-based collaborative tools of all descriptions – not just Zoom – the pandemic has led to a reset of office culture, from person to person to remote or hybrid. Surprisingly, there was also a reset for workers hardly anyone thought they could do their jobs from remotely, including field service engineers and emergency medical personnel. While these changes explain trends within the post-pandemic workplace, they also point to a new path forward for business-to-business relationships. Many examples come from the most practical industry of all: manufacturing. Workers still have to go to a factory and assemble products, and quality control may require trips abroad from time to time, but many other activities – including investment due diligence, relationship building with suppliers and customers, and even research and development – have unexpectedly and perhaps permanently disappeared. .



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