Tag Archives: Massachusetts

High-end fashion at Great Barrington’s fourth cannabis shop Local News | Instant News







Farnsworth Fine Cannabis

Alexander Farnsworth, left, and Adam Lippes founded Farnsworth Fine Cannabis, which opened last month in Great Barrington.




BIG BUTTON – Say goodbye to the joints of the past, the head shops of the past.

Farnsworth Fine Cannabis, one of the state’s first LGBTQ +-owned marijuana retailers, will sell packs of its own product-filtered cannabis cigarettes starting Friday, something the company’s founders say is “a new, collaborative innovation.”






Farnsworth smokes

Some of the products in a shop on North Main Street. The company will sell various types of cigarettes, in addition to flowers and other products, a line of jewelry and clothing, as well as new and antique cigarette goods.




The company, which opened on North Main Street last month, will sell a wide variety of cigarettes, in addition to flowers and other products, a line of jewelry and clothing, as well as new and vintage cigarettes, including Jack Kerouac’s table lighters.

It is the fourth shop in town to open since it was legalized, and owners Alexander Farnsworth and Adam Lippes, from Monterey and New York City, demolished an old building and poured their passion for beauty into the shop.

Their current marijuana comes from several Massachusetts farmers, including those in Pittsfield and Worcester. And they have promised that 65 percent of the workforce is LGBTQ +, people of color and veterans.

Farnsworth, a businessman whose brothers and sisters helped found the company, said that, after a long journey through a maze of rules, he was thrilled with his creation here with Lippes, a fashion designer.

“It was a dream,” he said, noting that customers so far consisted of locals, New York City residents, and people from 17 states. He had been working on the floor most of the time the shop was open.

And because his family is part of the company, Farnsworth says it has warmed the customer experience.

The store required a license several years ago, and a last-minute name change after the state said it “Highminded” would violate any nameplate rules intended to envelop the product.

“We have about 24 hours to choose a new name if we want to continue the licensing process,” said Farnsworth. “But I can’t say I wasn’t warned.”

They wanted regular street entrances where people could see inside, so, to comply with state regulations, they had to lobby where products other than marijuana were visible.

Farnsworth said the company plans to sell cigarettes to other markets and in other states. They’re unique, he says, in that they have a long filter to “keep heat away from your face.”

The shop also honors the family’s history of innovation, with a display of Farnsworth Radio that once lived in her grandmother’s Utah home. They were discovered by Farnsworth’s great-uncle, Philo Taylor Farnsworth, who was known for his work on perfecting television. He has 300 patents.

Alexander Farnsworth said that his family can provide a lot of new home radios here, because his grandmother’s house was taken over by the leading domain for the construction of the hospital. He is 92 years old.

“This comforted him,” he said. “To him, it felt like there was a resting place for this.”

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Boston Logan Airport Travel Volumes Will Take 3-5 Years To Rebound, Massport Says | Instant News



Air travel to Boston’s Logan International Airport has rebounded from historically low levels seen at the height of the coronavirus pandemic in 2020. However, Massport does not expect air travel to reach the levels seen in 2019 for another three to five years. Massachusetts Port Authority CEO Lisa Wieland said in a presentation to the Joint Committee on Tourism, the Arts and Cultural Development on Friday that the number of passengers traveling through Logan International Airport “has fallen by a cliff “at the start of the pandemic, dropping to just 2% of pre-COVID-19 travel at its lowest. Passengers passing through airport checkpoints nationwide have increased, but Wieland said the recovery had been patchy. More than a year after the start of the public health crisis, passenger volumes are still down “nearly 70%” from before COVID-19, Wieland said. “On a typical day in 2019, we would have around 1,200 inbound and outbound flights per day. Right now we have an average of between 500 and 550, ”Wieland told the committee. depend on business and international travel, two sectors that have been very slow to return – is down 70%. At other airports in the country, travel has decreased by around 50%. “We estimate we’ll end this fiscal year with around 10.5 million passengers. Logan really hasn’t seen such low activity since the mid-1970s,” Wieland said. Growing interest in travel, but said the impact of COVID-19 will continue to linger for several years. “Due to our current situation and our reliance on business and international travel, which has taken much longer to recover, as well as some structural changes in the airline industry, we expect this to will take about three to five years. to get back to our 2019 levels, “Wieland said. Information from the State House News Service was used in this report. BOSTON – Air travel to Boston’s Logan International Airport has rebounded by compared to historically low levels seen at the height of the coronavirus pandemic in 2020. However, Massport does not expect air travel to reach levels seen in 2019 for another three to five years. The CEO of the Authority Massachusetts Port Lisa Wieland said Friday in a presentation to the Joint Committee on Tourism, the Arts and Cultural Development that the number of passengers traveling through the international airport was Logan’s “fell off a cliff” at the start of the pandemic, dropping to just 2% of pre-COVID-19 travel at its low. The number of passengers passing through airport checkpoints nationwide has increased, but Wieland said the recovery has been patchy. More than a year after the start of the public health crisis, passenger volumes are still down “almost 70%” from before COVID- 19, said Wieland. “On a typical day in 2019, we would have around 1,200 inbound and outbound flights per day. Right now we have an average of between 500 and 550, ”Wieland told the committee. depend on business and international travel, two sectors that have been very slow to return – is down 70%. At other airports in the country, travel has decreased by around 50%. “We estimate we’ll end this fiscal year with around 10.5 million passengers. Logan really hasn’t seen such low activity since the mid-1970s,” Wieland said. Growing interest in travel, but said the impact of COVID-19 will continue to linger for several years. “Due to our current situation and our reliance on business and international travel, which has taken much longer to recover, as well as some structural changes in the airline industry, we expect this to will take about three to five years to return to our 2019 levels, “Wieland said. Information from the State House News Service was used in this report.



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COVID-19 Case on the Cape Causes Concern – NBC Boston | Instant News


Cape Cod is known for its summer vacations, beaches, seafood and ice cream – and now there is a spring of COVID-19 fears following a spike in the more contagious variant of the coronavirus first identified in Brazil.

Massachusetts has 58 variant cases, known as P.1, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s the third highest total in the country. Florida leads with 64 cases, followed by Illinois with 59 cases.

Of the 58 cases in Bay State, 50 were in Barnstable County. There are four each in the Essex and Middlesex region.

AREA B.1.1.7 B. 1,351 P.1
Barnstable County 23 50
Berkshire County 2
Bristol region 19
Duke and Nantucket
Essex County 101 3 4
Franklin County 2
Hampden County 9 1
County Hampshire 6
Middlesex County 136 5 4
Norfolk County 106 1
Plymouth County 39
Suffolk County 173 2
Worcester County 96
Total 712 12 58
Data from the Mass. DPH in variants by country starting April 2, 2021, and subject to change.

“We’ve been looking for them here because we have the first case here,” said Senator Julian Cyr, who is on the Cape Cod Reopening Task Force, of the variant.

In addition to this spike in variants, many cities in the Cape are colored red on the state map, which means cases will increase.

“I don’t think people follow that precaution, not social distancing,” said Cyr.

Ironically, the Cape also has the most people vaccinated in the state due to its older population.

Dr. William Hanage, a professor of epidemiology at Harvard, says this doesn’t mean people can let their guard down.

“Unfortunately people think that just vaccinating lots of people or being a leader in vaccinations means you can’t catch it, that’s not true,” he said. “It’s not true until you get lots of people vaccinated. When I say many people, I mean something like 80 percent. “

Residents hope this is the last hike.

“I don’t think it has to be a deterrent personally because if you take precautions and everything like that why is it different elsewhere,” said Michelle Bailey.

The Cape Cod Task Force said while alarming, it expected the spike to diminish in the summer tourist season, which is about eight weeks away.

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What to Know About COVID, Travel – NBC Boston | Instant News


Virtually impossible at the height of the pandemic, travel is making a comeback as the vaccination rollout continues, giving rise to the controversial notion of the vaccine passport. “In some cases, they’ve already arrived,” said Christopher Muther, travel writer for the Boston Globe, who wrote on the matter. A vaccination passport would show that a person has been vaccinated, which would allow them to travel within the country and abroad or attend large gatherings if necessary. “I think it’s a great idea. I really do. It will give more people the reassurance that the people around them are in the same situation,” said one man. There is a lot of confusion about them. over-the-counter drugs allowed after receiving the coronavirus vaccine. Here’s what you need to know before taking your photo. Currently, vaccine passports are scarce. For now, the federal governments and many states have stayed on the sidelines. New York State developed a vaccine passport, the first in the country, but last week Florida Governor Ron DeSantis banned the use of vaccine passports in his state. of Massachusetts, Charlie Baker, said the federal government must get involved in creating a centralized system. Yet the concept raises questions about civil liberties and privacy. “If we can get full immunity from the tr or hat, you won’t necessarily need a passport, ”said Carol Rose, executive director of the Massachusetts ACLU. Any passport should be accessible to everyone, and not just digitally, Rose said. Information gathering should be transparent and should not be used to track the movement of people, as a car’s E – ZPass system does. “We can do it at such a distance to prevent the government from doing anything other than what is absolutely necessary to meet this tightly tailored government interest in making sure we don’t die from a pandemic,” Rose said. Airlines and other travel industries are defining the debate as they try to bring travelers back. “There is no single system that is in place. It’s a real mishmash, as is the way countries have responded to the pandemic itself, ”said Muther. .



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The rise in cases of the UK’s COVID-19 variant at the Mass has doctors on high alert | Instant News


The spike in the number of COVID-19 cases involving a British variant in Massachusetts has local doctors on alert. Data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that Bay State has 441 confirmed cases of COVID B.1.1.7 variant -19, which was first discovered in the UK, as of Wednesday evening. The presence of three different variants of COVID-19 has been found in Massachusetts, and infectious disease experts predict the British variant will become the dominant strain in the state in the next four variants. The US has surpassed 30 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 as a country, and doctors say that its variant may be partly responsible for the recent increase in cases. contributing, and there may be a contribution from the increase in transmission of some of the variants that are now circulating, “said Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, head of the infectious disease division at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Bosto. Despite the alarming spread of the COVID-19 variant, all COVID-19 vaccines 19 available can protect against serious illness and death, even when it comes to the variant.

The spike in the number of COVID-19 cases involving a British variant in Massachusetts has local doctors on alert.

Data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed that Bay State had 441 confirmed cases of variant B.1.1.7 COVID-19, which was first discovered in the UK, as of Wednesday evening.

The presence of three different variants of COVID-19 have been discovered in Massachusetts, and infectious disease experts predict the British variant will become the dominant strain in the state in the next four to six weeks.

The US has surpassed 30 million confirmed cases of COVID-19 as a country, and doctors say that its variant may be partly responsible for the recent increase in cases.

“Increased travel – particularly spring break – may be contributing, and there may be a contribution from increased transmission of some of the variants that are now in circulation,” said Dr. Daniel Kuritzkes, head of the infection division. disease at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

While the spread of the COVID-19 variant is worrying, all the COVID-19 vaccines available can protect against severe illness and death, even when it comes to those variants.

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