Tag Archives: Massachusetts

Alleged Capitol rioters are planning to leave the US via Logan Airport | Instant News


Alleged Capitol rioters are planning to leave the country via Logan International Airport



DAVI BEFORE HE CAN CATCH THE FLIGHTS HERE IN LOGAN, RIOTER TREATMENT IS AUSED IN NEW YORK COUNTRY DUE TO ERRATIC DRIVING. THE POLICE SAY HE’S BLOOD ON HIM AND SAY THEM I MEETED TYRANNY IN DC CAPITOL AND I WANTED BY THE FBI VIDEO OF A CAPITOL ATTACK SHOWING A MAN USING A TAN JACKET, BLACK HELMET AND A GREEN BACKPACK. HELP TO INTRACT THE POLICE OFFICER A FEW STEPS WHEN OTHERS BEAT THEM WITH US FLAGS. OTHER PICTURES SHOW THE SAME PERSON HOLDING THE BATON ON THE OFFICER AS HE FACES THE STEPS. PEOPLE STARTED LISTENING, KILL HIM WITH HIS OWN USE. DAVID: NOW, FEDERAL PROCUTOR SAYS THE PERSON IN TAN’S JACKET HAS BEEN ARRESTED AND IDENTIFIED AS 51 YEARS OLD JEFFREY SABOL. AT THE VOTE AT FEDERAL COURT, THE JUDGE EXPLAINED SABOL’S ALMOST ALMOST ACTION OUT OF SALES AND SHOCKING. THE PROCUTOR SAYS AFTER THE ATTACK, SABOL ORDERED A PLANE TICKET FROM BOSTON TO SWITZERLAND, A COUNTY WHERE HE WILL NOT EXTRADITED BACK TO THE US FAR AWAY NOT APPEARING SABOL THAT WAS NEVER MADE FOR LOGAN. SHE WAS ARRESTED FRIDAY MORNING AT A HOSPITAL NEAR NEW YORK CITY. WHERE SHE TREATED FOR INJURY AFTER THE TRIAL KILL. PUBLIC NOTES SHOWING SABOL COMING FROM UTICA, NEW YORK. SHE DOES NOT LOOK CLOSE TO THE MASSACHUSETTS. FEE OF SABOL FACES

Alleged Capitol rioters are planning to leave the country via Logan International Airport

Authorities said the man booked a flight to Switzerland in an attempt to avoid extradition, but he never made it to the airport in Boston.

Authorities said the man booked a flight to Switzerland in an attempt to avoid extradition, but he never made it to the airport in Boston.

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The first case of the MA virus variant; The new test for the governorship of NH | Instant News


MASSACHUSETTS

Massachusetts health officials have announced the state’s first case of a more contagious variant of the coronavirus first discovered in Britain.

A Boston woman who traveled to England felt sick the day after she returned, the state Department of Public Health said Sunday. The health department said the results of the tests were notified on Saturday evening.

The woman in her 20s tested negative for COVID-19 before leaving the UK, officials said.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the variant is about 50% more contagious than other strains which currently cause the majority of cases in the country.

Health officials said in March the new strain was likely to become the dominant strain of coronavirus in the United States. The CDC says there is no evidence that it causes a more severe disease or is transmitted differently so wearing masks, social distancing and hand washing and other prevention strategies can still work.

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NEW HAMPSHIRE

More than 300 New Hampshire residents have made formal requests asking the Legislature to revoke powers granted to governors during emergencies such as the coronavirus pandemic.

The reprimand received by the clerk of the DPR on Thursday stated that the law which gives the governor the authority to administer emergency management is unconstitutional, even though it has been upheld in court.

“The experiences and feelings of your Memorialists too prove that some of the destructive exercise of undelegated power in issuing emergency orders and public policy guidelines was enforced due to a law recently adopted in New Hampshire,” the group wrote. Such actions could be made to get the good people of this country into the deepest trouble.

Several lawmakers have submitted bills that limit the governor’s powers. Someone will ask the governor to explain the conditions necessary to extend the state of emergency and will require approval from the Legislative Body or the Executive Council for reform. Another would allow the Legislature to terminate any emergency orders or portions of orders, while the third would require legislative approval of any orders issued during an emergency renewal.

Opinion polls show Republican Governor Chris Sununu enjoying bipartisan support for the handling of the pandemic, and he easily won re-election for a third term in November. He faced opposition from some members of his own party, as well as protests outside his home, however, from people who disagreed with the restrictions.

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RHODE ISLAND

The Rhode Island House of Representatives canceled its hearing on Tuesday after several members of its senior and operational staff tested positive for COVID-19.

House Speaker Joe Shekarchi said by email to his representatives on Monday morning that he was canceling a scheduled session at the Veterans Memorial Auditorium “out of extreme caution,” WPRI-TV reported.

This is the second session this year that was canceled due to cases among several employees.

“As you know, my highest priority is protecting the health and safety of all Board members,” Joe Shekarchi, D-Warwick, wrote in the email. He did not say how many employees had tested positive or when they were infected.

The DPR still plans to hold another trial on Thursday, he said.

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CONNECTICUT

Hundreds of Connecticut schoolteachers were able to sign up for coronavirus vaccine appointments before they actually qualify, due to confusion over the launch rules, a newspaper reported on Monday.

Maura Fitzgerald State Health Department spokeswoman was told The Hartford Courant problem arose after several school districts mistakenly entered their entire staff roster into the registration system when the state actually asked for a list of school nurses.

Teachers in the district get an automated email confirming their registration. That allowed them to make appointments for injections, and unknown numbers did, the newspaper said.

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VERMONT

The Vermont attorney general’s office said it had reached a settlement with owners of the Rutland gym which reopened in May against state rule at the start of the pandemic.

Under a settlement announced Friday, Club Fitness and owner Sean Manovill agreed to comply with the governor’s executive order and make payments to the Rutland Regional Distribution Center at Vermont Foodbank, the attorney general’s office said.

Currently, gyms are allowed to operate within occupancy and other restrictions.

“These are difficult times for all Vermonters, including small Vermont businesses,” said Attorney General TJ Donovan in a written statement. “But even in these difficult times, we all have to do our part. A large proportion of Vermonters have done the right thing by following executive orders and expert public health advice. “

Manovill could not be reached for comment. Phone messages were left at Club Fitness on Monday, a federal holiday.

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MAIN

The COVID-19 outbreak has closed the fire department in the city of Alfred.

All firefighters and EMS are in quarantine after several workers tested positive, newscentermaine.com reported.

An emergency call will be covered by Sanford, Waterboro, Lyman, Kennebunk and Goodwins Mills, city voters announced Saturday.

“Clearly our fire and rescue personnel are taking all possible precautions but given all the close contact with other people, it is no surprise this is the case,” wrote the voter in a Facebook post. “That’s the reason first responders got their first dose of the vaccine, but as you know the numbers have shot up recently and this is a reflection of that spike.”

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Geoffrey Goodman saves animals, one after another | West | Instant News


WEST – For 41-year-old Geoffrey Goodman, the coronavirus pandemic is very important: he is given the opportunity to save a number of furry four-legged friends.

“It gives me free time to do the things I’ve always dreamed of,” said Goodman, a native Westerner living in Ashaway, who teaches English – virtually – at the College of the Marshall Islands.

Goodman, the youngest son of Mary and Tobias Goodman of Weekapaug, recently completed two roundtrip trips to Alabama to rescue dogs and cats, and on one of the trips, he ended up “huddled in an SUV with three homeless dogs over frozen season nights. cold. “

Goodman, who graduated from Westerly High School in 1997, has a number of college degrees, including a master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island and a doctorate from Korea University, and has taught at colleges and universities in South Korea, Massachusetts, and Alabama.

He hasn’t always dreamed of chilling in a vehicle with a rescue dog, but he has long wanted to help animals in need on a larger scale.

“It felt like I was making good use of my time,” Goodman said. “I’m lucky enough to have a very flexible work schedule that allows me to do more transportation.”

Plus, adds Goodman, who describes some of his experiences on the phone and email, “I think I’m a bleeding heart.”

When he lived in Alabama and worked at Auburn University, Goodman sometimes volunteered at animal shelters, where he saw hundreds of animals waiting to be adopted.

“Animal shelters in much of the South are filled with cats and dogs,” he explained. Alabama has been hit by a number of natural disasters in recent years, from hurricanes to tornadoes and floods. When people are forced to flee their homes, they are often forced to leave their animals behind, as shelters rarely accept pets.

Goodman says one of the many things he’s learned is how the world of animal welfare attracts “great sleeping companions.”

“There are academics and religious people, LGBTQ people and mothers,” he said. “You see all kinds of people.”

On his first trip south, Goodman headed for Gadsden, Ala., Well prepared for the distance amid the pandemic.

With the correct mask and gloves, he wrote, “I carry all my supplies for the trip and just interact … with the gas station.”

When she arrived at Carol Huckaby’s “Huckaby’s Hope for Paws,” she said, “her now sterile habits are at odds with the kennel I’m going to live in.”

Huckaby, in his 60s, is a cigarette smoker wearing “a good used ‘Huckaby’s Hope for Paws’ sweat shirt and pants,” Goodman says, and his place, an old little shop window sandwiched between a glass replacement shop and lots of second-hand parts. , literally smelled like a pigsty. Because it is.

Inside Huckaby’s shop, he wrote, he saw two little creatures waiting in the stable, “rustling on the hay and pig feed, the happiest piglets in town.”

Next to the piglet, Domino, the 40-pound, black-and-white 5-month-old puppy (“Looks like a mix of boxers, American Staffordshire terriers, and squirrel monkeys”) roams in front of the kennels then “runs down the cord to give them kisses and yelps. . “

After loading Domino into his van, Goodman followed Huckaby to pick up the other passengers.

With Domino seated at the front, “her head securely attached to the derailleur,” Goodman proceeded to fetch Star (“less than a year, big terrier and whatever with the largest random burst of mud” sitting “quietly in his cage, guard wolf, completely hiding the original character. “

The next passenger was Butterscotch, a mixed breed, about nine weeks old, so small he could carry her in one arm.

After a memorable trip (listening to a podcast with his friends “biting, wiggling and wagging” along the way), Goodman hooked up with Alyssa Ellman, who raises animals and coordinates adoptions under the name Alyssa Rescues.

“It wasn’t until I gave up the dogs in Massachusetts that I realized the importance of that moment to the new dog crowd,” Goodman wrote. “They got a new family member.”

A boy in the family who adopted Domino “immediately started telling Domino everything about his new life and that he was actually named Lola,” Goodman said.

On his most recent trip, Goodman brought home a dog for his mother, a multi-colored mixed breed named Selma.

“Geoff has always been sensitive and always been a helper,” said Mary Goodman, who lent her son’s Jeep for his first trip to Alabama and rented out a large SUV for his Christmas week outing.

“He’s great … he’s generous,” he added, noting that, as a teacher, part of his job is “to make the experience richer.”

“There are a lot of dogs and cats that need homes, but my car can only accommodate so many,” Goodman said. “With longer waiting times, Carol and Alyssa say they will be able to fill a much larger vehicle.”

Goodman says he’s looking for a large truck, van, or SUV to borrow or buy (“at a fair price”) for the next 2,500 mile round trip to Alabama.

“I’ll sterilize it later, and maybe even have a new, perfect dog or cat in it for you,” Goodman said.

Goodman can be reached at [email protected].

[email protected]

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Players wear masks on court during Boston University basketball game, Holy Cross | Instant News


Boston University men’s and women’s basketball teams kick off their season on Monday wearing masks – not just on the sidelines, but during their games. Daman Tate scored 28 points, nine rebounds and four steals for the BU men in their 83-76 win at the Holy Cross. Even though the Terriers wore masks, since the school required all teams, the Crusaders did not. Back at the BU campus in Boston, Sydney Johnson scored 18 points to lead the Terrier woman to a 76-54 win over Holy Cross with both teams wearing masks. Masks will also be needed for both parties when the BU men host Holy Cross at the Case Gym on Tuesday; It is believed to be the first men’s college basketball game with both teams wearing masks. Although the NCAA has yet to mandate masks on the pitch, several women’s teams have worn them – the most notable of which is DePaul No. 20. Creighton coach Jim Flanery handed it over to his players, and eight out of 13 chose to cover it up. Tate, who was sidelined throughout last season through injury, is 10 of 11 from the field for BU, including four of the seven BU 3-pointers. Terriers shoot 54.2% of the field. Javante McCoy added 17 points and six rebounds for BU, Jack Hemphill scored 12 points and Sukhmail Mathon had 10 points and seven boards. Defending Patriot League champions returned four starters from last year’s team, Austin Butler leading the Holy Cross with 24 points and eight rebounds. Gerrale Gates has 19 points and eight boards, and Matt Faw scored 13. The Patriot League canceled all pre-season non-conference games, leaving BU and Holy Cross with most of the local contests. BU and Holy Cross will meet six times each in men’s and women’s basketball.

Boston University men’s and women’s basketball teams open their season on Monday wearing masks – not just on the sidelines, but during their games.

Daman Tate contributed 28 points, nine rebounds and four steals for the BU squad in their 83-76 win at Holy Cross. Even though the Terriers wore masks, as the school asked of all the teams, the Crusaders did not.

Back at the BU campus in Boston, Sydney Johnson scored 18 points to lead the female Terrier to a 76-54 win over Holy Cross with both teams wearing masks. Masks will also be needed for both parties when the BU men host Holy Cross at the Case Gym on Tuesday; It is believed to be the first men’s college basketball game with both masked teams.

Although the NCAA does not mandate masks on the pitch, several women’s teams have worn them – the most notable of which is DePaul No. 20. Creighton coach Jim Flanery left it to his players, and eight out of 13 chose to cover it up.

Tate, who was sidelined throughout last season through injury, scored 10 of 11 from the field for BU’s men, including four of seven BU’s three-pointer. Terriers shoot 54.2% of the field.

Javante McCoy added 17 points and six rebounds for BU, Jack Hemphill scored 12 points and Sukhmail Mathon had 10 points and seven boards. The defending Patriot League champions returned four starters from last year’s team.

Austin Butler led Holy Cross with 24 points and eight rebounds. Gerrale Gates has 19 points and eight boards, and Matt Faw scored 13.

The Patriot League canceled all pre-season non-conference matches, leaving BU and Holy Cross with most of the local contests. BU and Holy Cross will meet six times each in men’s and women’s basketball.

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Concern over rise in COVID-19 cases with post-vacation travel | Instant News



Massachusetts residents who traveled for the vacation are heading home before returning to work and school on Monday, and there are concerns that the number of vacation trips in the state and across the county may lead to an increase in cases of COVID-19. The Security Administration said it had screened nearly 1.2 million travelers at airports across the country on Saturday, the day after New Year’s Day, a figure similar to the number of travelers TSA has checked in the days following Christmas. According to its own data, the TSA has screened more than one million travelers for five consecutive days from December 26 to December 30, with the Massachusetts Port Authority saying Sunday was not too busy a day at the international airport. by Logan. remain in distance learning on Monday, while many Massachusetts colleges and universities won’t start the spring semester until later in the month. BOSTON – Massachusetts residents who traveled for the vacation are heading home before returning to work and school on Monday, and there are concerns that the number of vacation trips in the state and across the county could cause a increase in COVID-19 cases. The Transportation Security Administration said it had screened nearly 1.2 million travelers at airports across the country on Saturday, the day after New Year’s Day. This number is similar to the number of travelers the TSA examined in the days after Christmas. According to its own data, the TSA has screened more than one million travelers for five consecutive days from December 26 to December 30, with the Massachusetts Port Authority saying Sunday was not too busy a day at the international airport. by Logan. remain in distance learning on Monday, while many Massachusetts colleges and universities won’t start the spring semester until later in the month. .



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