Tag Archives: maybe

How a New Zealand song from the 1800s started the sea hut craze in Tiktok | Instant News


Nathan Evan’s classic NZ ocean hut, The Wellerman, is loved by over 1.2 million followers and the collaborative video is inspiring. Photo / TikTok

When Scottish postman and part-time singer Nathan Evans posted a video of himself singing a 200 year old sea hut, he probably didn’t expect his little boy to go viral.

The original TikTok video shows Evan singing a heartfelt version of the song called The Wellerman. The song originates around 1860 and is widely understood to have originated in New Zealand.

The full title of the famous sea hut is Soon May The Wellerman Come, which refers to the supply ship owned by the Weller Brothers.

British-born trader Weller Brothers managed a supply ship to New Zealand in the 1800s. The employees working on the supply vessels, which supply New Zealand whalers with supplies, are colloquially known as ‘wellerman’.

The songwriter is unknown. Shanties were very popular with sailors at the time, but they were not often written down on paper, but traveled by word of mouth. Soon May The Wellerman Come was first published in a New Zealand folk songbook in 1973.

Evan’s The Wellerman on TikTok is liked by more than 1.2 million followers. Not only that, the heartfelt song has inspired other talented TikTok-ers to collaborate.

Coat everything from bass vocals for electronic beats and a violin, TikTok users have made sea huts an absolute banger.

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Wild weather: Severe thunderstorm warnings issued for parts of South Island, strong winds for central North Island | Instant News


Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Severe thunderstorm warnings have been issued tonight for the Canterbury Plains and North Otago, accompanied by heavy rain and hail that are likely to hit the area.

Other parts of the country will be hit by strong winds.

MetService has warned people in the Canterbury Plains and North Otago to be prepared for flash floods around low-lying areas such as rivers, streams or narrow valleys, which can cause slipping. Rainfall is expected to be more than 25mm in some areas.

A front moved eastward across the South Island overnight.

This means that heavy rain can occur with thunderstorms in the Westland region south of Otira, and in Dunedin and North Otago.

Driving conditions will also be dangerous, with surface flooding and poor visibility during heavy rain.

Heavy hail can cause significant damage to crops, orchards, vines, greenhouses and vehicles.

Northwest winds can reach heavy storms from inland Canterbury to Marlborough, Wellington and Wairarapa.

Meanwhile, a storm likely to bring destructive winds and heavy waves centered on New Zealand’s West Coast, prompting warnings for those camping, on foot or on the water.

Weatherwatch.co.nz estimates strong winds “damaging” more than 150 km / h, waves of up to 13 meters, and one meter of snow in the Southern Alps.

There may also be over 200 mm of rain for parts of the West Coast.

Police say they have not issued a specific warning for the storm, but they always urge motorists to drive according to the conditions.

“In wet and windy weather that means slowing down and increasing the distance to follow,” said a spokesman.

Philip Duncan at weatherwatch.co.nz said the storm would be significant.

Weather and wind action today.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Weather and wind action today. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

“The stormy Southern Ocean weather pattern is temporarily putting the La Nina pattern to one side with two significant lows – one today and the other around Tuesday, Wednesday.

“Sunday’s low, which still hasn’t suppressed some thunderstorms, rain and winds for parts of New Zealand, will actually be tracing out of the country today. So we don’t expect anything too serious today, although it remains up-to-date with possible MetService severe warning no matter where you are. “

Estimated wind speed on Monday evening at 7pm.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Estimated wind speed on Monday evening at 7pm. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

But the ensuing storm worries Duncan, especially for those venturing outdoors.

“The Tuesday / Wednesday event appears to be the most intense with the epicenter of this hurricane potentially crossing Southland and Otago.”

As a hurricane hits the country with its strong northwest strong winds, it will then be followed by a cool southern turn with heavy rains that will hit the West Coast.

Weather and wind types are expected on Tuesday at 13.00.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Weather and wind types are expected on Tuesday at 13.00. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Auckland is expected to cool down but will not experience as violent a storm as the South Island one.

MetService meteorologist Peter Little said southwestern changes that begin on Wednesday through Thursday will bring temperatures down to 10C on the South Island.

Dunedin will drop from 25C today to 15C.

Few say that temperature changes won’t be as dramatic as on the North Island, but people will definitely feel the impact from the southwest.

Auckland will drop from 27C today to 21C on Wednesday, and 20C on Thursday.

Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Until then, the hot weather will continue. Whangārei and Gisborne can expect temperatures of 30C, Auckland and Tauranga 27C and Hamilton 26C.

In today’s South Island, Kaikoura is a hot spot of 28C. Christchurch and Ashburton are set at 27C.

The front exerts its energies on the South Island, and central New Zealand – Wellington, Wairarapa – is bearing the brunt of strong winds. Bad weather warning has been issued.

-RNZ additional reporting

Wind gusts speed early Monday.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Wind gusts speed early Monday. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

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Urgent attention as ‘destructive’ storm will hit NZ; West Coast in the firing line | Instant News


Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

A storm that is likely to bring destructive winds and swells is centered on New Zealand’s West Coast, prompting warnings for those camping, on foot or on the water.

Weatherwatch.co.nz estimates strong winds “damaging” more than 150 km / h, waves of up to 13 meters, and one meter of snow in the Southern Alps.

There may also be over 200 mm of rain for parts of the West Coast.

Police say they have not issued a specific warning for the storm, but they always urge motorists to drive according to the conditions.

“In wet and windy weather that means slowing down and increasing the distance to follow,” said a spokesman.

Philip Duncan at weatherwatch.co.nz said the storm would be significant.

Weather and wind action today.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Weather and wind action today. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

“The stormy Southern Ocean weather pattern is temporarily putting the La Nina pattern to one side with two significant lows – one today and the other around Tuesday, Wednesday.

“Sunday’s low, which still hasn’t suppressed some thunderstorms, rain and winds for parts of New Zealand, will actually be tracing out of the country today. So we don’t expect anything too serious today, although it remains up-to-date with possible MetService severe warning no matter where you are. “

Estimated wind speed on Monday evening at 7pm.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Estimated wind speed on Monday evening at 7pm. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

But the ensuing storm worries Duncan, especially for those venturing outdoors.

“The Tuesday / Wednesday event appears to be the most intense with the epicenter of this hurricane potentially crossing Southland and Otago.”

As a hurricane hits the country with its strong northwest strong winds, it will then be followed by a cool southern turn with heavy rains that will hit the West Coast.

Weather and wind types are expected on Tuesday at 13.00.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Weather and wind types are expected on Tuesday at 13.00. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Auckland is expected to cool down but will not experience as violent a storm as the South Island one.

MetService meteorologist Peter Little said southwestern changes that begin on Wednesday through Thursday will bring temperatures down to 10C on the South Island.

Dunedin will drop from 25C today to 15C.

Few say that temperature changes won’t be as dramatic as on the North Island, but people will definitely feel the impact from the southwest.

Auckland will drop from 27C today to 21C on Wednesday, and 20C on Thursday.

Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Most of the rain that starts at 7am Monday will be the biggest on the West Coast of the South Island. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

Until then, the hot weather will continue. Whangārei and Gisborne can expect temperatures of 30C, Auckland and Tauranga 27C and Hamilton 26C.

In today’s South Island, Kaikoura is a hot spot of 28C. Christchurch and Ashburton are set at 27C.

The front exerts its energies on the South Island, and central New Zealand – Wellington, Wairarapa – is bearing the brunt of strong winds. Bad weather warning has been issued.

Meanwhile, warnings were in place tonight for the Canterbury Plains and North Otago, where it is expected to see more than 25 mm of rain, along with hail.

MetService has warned people to be prepared for flash floods around low-lying areas such as rivers, streams or narrow valleys, which can cause slipping.

Driving conditions will also be dangerous, with surface flooding and poor visibility during heavy rain.

Heavy hail can cause significant damage to crops, orchards, vines, greenhouses and vehicles.

-RNZ additional reporting

Wind gusts speed early Monday.  Image / weatherwatch.co.nz
Wind gusts speed early Monday. Image / weatherwatch.co.nz

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America’s Cup 2021: ‘Kiwi Kryptonite’ – meet the screen legend who beat Team New Zealand three times, and come back | Instant News


If there is any reason to be wary of Ineos Team UK at America’s Cup 2021, it may be the presence of an understated 63 year old Australian.

Of the three challengers, the English team has

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Prison chaos: New Zealand’s riotous prison history | Instant News


Prison reform groups and prison supporters called it a protest. The authorities are more likely to call it a riot.

Either way, this week’s chaos is on Waikeria Prison is the longest-running and most destructive showdown in New Zealand prisons for decades.

The Waikeria disturbance dwarfed the 2013 Spring Hill riots, when inmates drunk on home-brew ran rampant and burned but controlled within nine hours.

Over generations, riots and protests broke out in New Zealand prisons for a variety of reasons.

Despite the widespread damage, the deadlock in Waikeria was resolved by negotiation.

In the past, prison rebellions were sometimes only suppressed by extreme violence.

FEATHERSTON POW CAMP, 1943

Japanese prisoners of war (above) gardening at Camp Featherston under the supervision of NZ Army guards, dated 1943-1945.
Japanese prisoners of war (above) gardening at Camp Featherston under the supervision of NZ Army guards, dated 1943-1945.

Over the years, confrontation and carnage in a camp near the quiet town of South Wairarapa is one of New Zealand’s darkest secrets.

After the Allied victory at Guadalcanal, Japanese prisoners of war (POW) were taken from the Solomon Islands to New Zealand.

That camping in Featherston held hundreds of prisoners of war.

In February 1943, several Japanese prisoners of war went on strike. The unruly inmates threw stones and then reportedly ran off the guards.

The guards opened fire, killing 31 prisoners in about 30 seconds. 17 other prisoners died later from their wounds, and one guard died.

According to NZ Geographic, many government agencies edited the first report, fearing Japanese retaliation against the Commonwealth POWs.

A military court of inquiry found that the shooting was unavoidable.

Some court details and many other official records were withheld under an embargo for 50 years.

MT EDEN, 1965

Mount Eden is a place where it doesn’t work an escape attempt in July 1965.

Daniel MacMillan and Godfrey Jonassen Sadaraka planned the vacation.

“Their plan was simple and involved a gun, locks and brute force,” the crime writer and sociologist Jarrod Gilbert wrote in the Herald.

“The two men freed the other inmates with improvised keys and iron bars.”

The central Auckland Prison, which was currently housing inmates serving sentences for violent crimes, burst into flames and chaos.

“Violent rioting” destroyed the interior but failed to permanently close the prison, wrote author Mark Derby Rock College: The unofficial history of the Mount Eden Prison.

The rioting continued for 33 hours, causing severe damage.

“Lines of armed police, guards and troops stand guard around the prison in hastily mounted spotlights,” explained the 1966 Encyclopedia of New Zealand.

After the police and prison authorities took control, some of the disorderly inmates were transferred to Christchurch.

It proved to be far from ideal for a South Island city.

CHRISTCHURCH, 1965

Mt Eden Prison in the 1960's.  Several unwanted rioters from the Auckland prison were sent to Christchurch, where their penchant for protesting soon became clear to the Cantabrian guards.  Photo / Provided
Mt Eden Prison in the 1960’s. Several unwanted rioters from the Auckland prison were sent to Christchurch, where their penchant for protesting soon became clear to the Cantabrian guards. Photo / Provided

Within a week, new arrivals were driven from Mount Eden sparking riots in Paparua in Christchurch.

Chaos broke out during chapel service and six guards were injured.

Immediately after, flames lit up on the east wing of the prison.

“Firefighters trying to control the blaze were confronted with a barrage of cutlery, bottles, bricks and furniture,” said a British journalist at Movietone-AP at the time.

Tear gas was used to suppress riots.

By the time the rioting was stopped, more than 40 wardens and police were lightly injured, said Encyclopedia New Zealand.

RIMUTAKA, 2007

Aerial view of Rimutaka Prison, where rioters caused $ 410,000 worth of damage in the 2007 upheaval. File photo / Mark Mitchell
Aerial view of Rimutaka Prison, where rioters caused $ 410,000 worth of damage in the 2007 upheaval. File photo / Mark Mitchell

North Wellington, Rimutaka Prison staggered from scandal to scandal in 2007.

The Herald describes the catastrophic cascade of the time. In March of that year, 11 staff were withdrawn pending a corruption and smuggling investigation.

That same month, a senior manager was given special leave due to a claim of mismanagement.

Convicted rapist Peter Mana McNamara somehow managed to father a son while serving seven years in prison.

In April, young men affiliated with rival gangs Black Power and Mongrel Mob rioted, reportedly causing thousands of dollars worth of damage.

The following month, inmates took over part of the juvenile offender unit, leaving the entire prison locked up.

The NZPA reports that about 15 inmates climbed onto the roof and stayed there for more than five hours before being coaxed down.

The riot damage cost $ 410,000, according to the NZPA report.

A parole board source on Sunday said Rimutaka had carried out reforms and was now considered one of the country’s best prisons and most effective in rehabilitation.

NORTHLAND, 2012

The Ngawha Prison near Kaikohe was the scene of riots in 2012. But the disturbance was insignificant when compared to the chaos of Waikeria.  Photo / Dean Purcell
The Ngawha Prison near Kaikohe was the scene of riots in 2012. But the disturbance was insignificant when compared to the chaos of Waikeria. Photo / Dean Purcell

At Northland Regional Prison near Kaikohe, riot squads were deployed after inmates damaged cells and started a fire.

The entire prison, known as Ngawha, was locked.

The riots erupted a month after a confrontation between guards and inmates that left an officer hospitalized with minor injuries after being hit to the head.

However, the disturbance only lasted about an hour.

The Herald at the time reported Correction staff from Auckland being sent to the prison, including highly trained members of the control and restraint unit.

Mac Anania’s parents later told RNZ that prisoners were responsible for the riot.

He said prison prisoners were often restless because they were smokers who suddenly found themselves in prison turning cold turkeys.

SPRING HILL, 2013:

Emergency services try to extinguish fires during riots at Spring Hill Waikato Prison in June 2013.Photo / Doug Sherring
Emergency services try to extinguish fires during riots at Spring Hill Waikato Prison in June 2013.Photo / Doug Sherring

In the winter of 2013, several inmates got drunk on homebrew and lit a fire at the Spring Hill prison near Hampton Downs, between Hamilton and Auckland.

As news of the fiery rebellion spread to other prisons, inmates with maximum security Paremoremo jammed the gates and tried to start a fire.

But serious disruption only occurs in Spring Hill.

And unlike this week’s Waikeria chaos, the disruption on Spring Hill was brought under control in less than half a day.

In a post-riot review, Correction said the Spring Hill disturbance was the biggest and most damaging case of “mutual indiscipline” in any prison in the 21st century.

And an investigation finds parts of the prison management team are divided and malfunctioning.

The Spring Hill Riot caused $ 10 million in damage.

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