Tag Archives: Mining

Australia: Stocks strengthened on stronger commodity prices | Instant News


Australian stock markets finished the session higher on Thursday, February 25, 2021, with miners and energy players leading the rally on the back of stronger commodity prices. At the closing bell, the benchmark S & P / ASX200 added 56.21 points, or 0.83%, to 6,834.03. The wider All Ordinaries rose 56.33 points, or 0.8%, to 7,105.69.

Mining stocks rose, helped by a jump in iron ore futures amid expectations for a rebound in global demand, and as copper prices surged after the US Federal Reserve signaled further support measures. Global miners BHP Group and Rio Tinto jumped 3.3% and 1.9%, respectively.

Energy stocks rose as oil prices spiked to 13-month highs, helped by expectations for continued accommodative monetary policy and lower crude oil production in the United States. Oil & gas explorers Woodside Petroleum and Santos Ltd closed 2.7% and 3% higher, respectively.

Tech stocks follow U.

S. peers are higher. Buy-now-pay-later giant Afterpay entered a trading halt after saying it was exploring additional share listings overseas.

Link Administration Holdings rose 2.3% after the superannuation service provider said shareholders of its PEXA unit agreed to explore the possibility of taking the online property transaction company public.

Flight Center (FLT) was up close to 9% despite a $ 233 million first-half loss from last year’s $ 22 million profit. Revenues fell 90% as COVID-19 travel restrictions hindered tourism.

A2M was particularly weighed down by investors’ reactions to the earnings results release. The A2M is the worst performer among the ASX 200 with 16.2 slides. Milk and formula producers saw their profits fall 35% to NZ $ 120 million with border closings hampering its daigou trade. A2M also lowered its TA income guide for the third time in five months.

ECONOMIC NEWS: Australian Private Capital Expenditure Up 3% Quarterly In Q4- Australia’s private capital spending increased 3% quarterly in the fourth quarter of 2020, the Australian Bureau of Statistics said on Thursday, following a 3.0% drop in the previous three months. Capital expenditures on buildings and structures increased 0.7% in the December 2020 quarter, while capital expenditures on equipment, plants and machinery increased 5.7% in the December 2020 quarter. Capital expenditures for mining decreased 1.4% in the December 2020 quarter, meanwhile Capital expenditure for non-mining increased by 4.9% in the December 2020 quarter.

CURRENCY NEWS: The Australian dollar is changing hands at $ 0.7974, stronger than the level below $ 0.784 seen last week.

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(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is generated automatically from a syndicated feed.)

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In Brazil, Indigenous leaders prove an unlikely ally in the Bolsonaro mining effort | Instant News


Irisnaide Silva is female, Brazilian and Indigenous. And for once, in her sight, she was heard.

For decades his family selected and panned the border near Venezuela, scouring the hills for diamonds and gold.

They continued digging even after Brazil in 2005 marked the land as Indigenous territory, an act that banned mining despite protests from his family and other wildlife in his Macuxi tribe.

Now, Silva is none other than the ear of Jair Bolsonaro, the president of Brazil.

A nationalist who deeply resents the global green movement for his desire to develop the Amazon rainforest, Bolsonaro has twice met Silva in the Brazilian capital.

He first saw him, along with several like-minded tribal leaders, soon after taking power in January 2019 discussing a bill that would allow mining on native land.

An Indigenous child works in a gold mine in the Santa Creuza community on the Raposa Serra do Sol reservation in October 2020. | REUTERS

“Some people want you to remain in indigenous territories like prehistoric animals,” Bolsonaro said at the meeting. “Below the ground you have billions or trillions of dollars.”

Silva, 32, heads one of the two main Indigenous groups in the Amazon state of Roraima. Other groups, and many other Indigenous associations, see him as traitors manipulated by greedy intruders who want to seize land and resources.

He doesn’t care.

“I am called a white Indian,” Silva said over the roaring chickens of his steel-roofed home in the Raposa Serra do Sol reserve. Although his mixed-race background was unusual, critics used it to question his credibility.

“Others say I can’t lead because I’m a woman.”

His drive for development – and Bolsonaro’s desire to activate it – goes far beyond questions about mining and material wealth. It challenges decades of government policies that have sought to deter intruders, and sparked a historical debate about whether some of the world’s most isolated tribes should be integrated into modern society or left alone, along with the Amazon.

Larger than Western Europe and home to nearly all of Brazil’s Indigenous lands, the world’s largest rainforest is a bulwark against climate change, its vegetation serving as a giant filter for greenhouse gases.

The native land makes up 13% of Brazil – a protected area roughly the size of Egypt. But with indigenous people making up less than 0.5% of Brazil’s population, agricultural and mining groups have long watched these low-population areas voraciously.

Irisnaide Silva met Governor Roraima Antonio Denarium in Boa Vista, Brazil, in October 2020. |  REUTERS
Irisnaide Silva met Governor Roraima Antonio Denarium in Boa Vista, Brazil, in October 2020. | REUTERS

It is unclear whether Bolsonaro’s bill will pass the tough Brazilian Congress, or how profitable mining is on this land. But the timing has never been more favorable for the president, with allies recently winning leadership in both assemblies and a pandemic-stricken economy desperate for investment.

Bolsonaro has made the bill a priority for 2021.

By working with several Indigenous people, activists say he is exacerbating tensions within tribes through division and conquest methods that have historically helped destroy indigenous lands around the world.

“Bolsonaro used a colonial strategy,” said Antenor Vaz, a former veteran field agent for Brazil’s Indigenous affairs agency Funai.

New El Dorado

The prospect of legalization has led thousands of prospectors to venture into indigenous territories.

The Bolsonaro bill lays down a regulatory framework to open up this area to legal mining for the first time. Controversially, it will not give Indigenous communities veto power.

Many indigenous communities continue to lead rural lifestyles, pursuing little modern development beyond small-scale agriculture. But Silva and people like him believe that Indigenous people have the same rights as other Brazilians to exploit their resources.

The state of Roraima, with a small mining industry due to its large reserves, is already attracting investors. Anastase Papoortzis, head of state development company Codesaima, said the company has 29 exploration permits in indigenous territories and will attend a mining fair in Canada this year.

“It’s been set for us to go and present Roraima as a new mining frontier, the new El Dorado,” he said.

Lust for treasure, and the destruction it causes, has shaped this northern part of the Amazon basin since the Europeans arrived in the 18th century. Early maps even place El Dorado, the legendary city of gold, somewhere between green hills and scarred purple stone.

Since then the seekers have come.

In the 1950s, Silva’s grandfather arrived from northeast Brazil to try his luck. He married a local Macuxi woman and started a family. Silva Celson’s father, now 68, has been out digging with his father since the age of eight.

Silva was also looking forward to his childhood, but only during the holidays because his father insisted he stay at school, walking three hours a day to attend class. “I’m still mine sometimes,” she said, “but it’s bad for my nails.”

In the 2000s, when he finished school and was trained as a teacher, Indigenous factions competed over how to protect their homeland. The struggles at Raposa Serra do Sol have become emblematic of the Brazilian debate on Indigenous policies.

Indigenous people work in a gold mine in the Napoleao community on the Raposa Serra do Sol reservation, Roraima state, Brazil, in October 2020. |  REUTERS
Indigenous people work in a gold mine in the Napoleao community on the Raposa Serra do Sol reservation, Roraima state, Brazil, in October 2020. | REUTERS

While the larger Roraima Adat Council (CIR) wants sustainable nature reserves that remove outsiders from the area, Silva’s Society for the Defense of the United Indians of Roraima (Sodiurr) believes peasants should be allowed to stay, defining tribal areas as islands in around them. property.

Sodiurr argues that rice and cow farmers, who moved there in the previous decades, brought jobs and development.

After April 15, 2005, when the government ratified the Raposa Serra do Sol as a sustainable nature reserve, many farmers resisted eviction. Sporadic attacks on Indigenous opponents raged for several years, injuring more than a dozen people.

‘There will be blood’

Silva didn’t fight, but it did inform his politics.

After a tenure as a city councilor, he won the leadership election of Sodiurr in 2019 and amplified his pro-development, pro-integration message. As he put it: “Nobody here wants to walk around with their sobs.”

He has expanded their social media presence and aligned organizations with right-wing state and federal governments.

Membership has also increased, according to Silva. Seven communities have changed allegiance, leaving CIR to join him, while eight others are in conversation, he said. There are about 350 indigenous communities in the state.

Edinho Batista de Souza, a CIR leader, said he was not aware the community was changing sides.

“The presidency (Sodiurr) does not speak the same language as the people,” he said. “The government is trying to manipulate some of the leaders, including the president, but the bases don’t agree with this idea.”

Although Sodiurr’s membership is less than half the CIR, smaller organizations now have support in Brasilia.

“It’s an old problem, but they used to be in the minority, now they have the President of the Republic … now they are in power,” said Marcio Meira, a former head of Funai who worked closely with both sides during the demarcation.

Responding to a question, Funai said he did not know the size of each group or how they might change. He declined to comment on the competition, other than saying it did not condone violence.

Bolsonaro’s agenda appears to trigger change before a vote on his mining bill. Near Napoleao, an Indigenous town of 1,200 people in the mountains south of Raposa Serra do Sol, workers sweat from dawn to dusk, cutting deep into the producing rock.

Some have pneumatic workouts, but most chase purple veins with only muscles and pickaxes. Miners of wood from the rock face, bent under the lucky sack.

The “mountains”, as the five feral cat mines are known, have been running since July 2019. It has driven the change that Silva so desperately wants.

A Native displays flakes of gold and nuggets in the Santa Creuza community on the Raposa Serra do Sol reservation.  |  REUTERS
A Native displays flakes of gold and nuggets in the Santa Creuza community on the Raposa Serra do Sol reservation. | REUTERS

The city gets 4% of the mining profits, according to Carpejane Lima, 38, the town’s Indigenous leader and an ally of Silva. The diggers took 74% and those with the machines to extract gold took the last 22%.

“The power company has cut off electricity because we can’t pay the bills,” said Lima, in the shade of a mango tree. Now a cavalry of diesel generators is turning next to the general store which is reopening. Across the street, there is a stand selling replica soccer shirts.

“We can make this a prosperous city,” said Lima, a 48 gram gold bracelet gleaming on her wrist.

But mining brings in outsiders. Some tribes have the skills or capital needed to crush and process ore. This arrival, say critics, brought drugs, prostitution and disease. Mercury, which is used to separate gold, also occurs at alarming levels in the blood of some Indigenous populations.

Since Bolsonaro was elected, CIR said 2,000 miners had trespassed on Raposa Serra do Sol to work on mines like this. Silva emphasized that only the native wild in the country.

In a hole by the river near Silva’s house, where his father lived under a tarp for weeks, a small group dug in the scorching sun.

“We will fight for what is ours,” said Celson. “If people who don’t belong come here to try and stop us, there will be blood.”

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In Brazil, an indigenous woman joins Bolsonaro in the struggle for mining | Instant News


RAPOSA SERRA DO SOL, Brazil (Reuters) – Irisnaide Silva is female, Brazilian and native.

Irisnaide Silva, 32, an Indigenous leader of one of the two main indigenous groups in Roraima state in the Amazon, gestures at the Raposa Serra do Sol reservation, Roraima state, Brazil, October 5, 2020. Image taken October 5, 2020. REUTERS / Leonardo Benassatto NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES

And for once, in her sight, she was heard.

For decades his family selected and panned the border near Venezuela, scouring the hills for diamonds and gold.

They continued digging even after Brazil marked the land in 2005 as indigenous territory, an act that banned mining despite protests from his family and other wildlife in his Macuxi tribe.

Now, Silva is none other than the ear of Jair Bolsonaro, the president of Brazil.

A nationalist who deeply resents the global green movement for his desire to develop the Amazon rainforest, Bolsonaro has twice met Silva in the Brazilian capital.

He first saw him, along with several like-minded tribal leaders, soon after taking power in January 2019 discussing a bill that would allow mining on native land.

“Some people want you to stay on indigenous territories like prehistoric animals,” Bolsonaro said at the meeting. “Below the ground you have billions or trillions of dollars.”

Silva, 32, heads one of the two main indigenous groups in the Amazon state of Roraima. But other groups, and many other indigenous associations, see him as traitors manipulated by greedy intruders seeking to seize land and resources.

He doesn’t care.

“I’ve been called a white Indian,” Silva told Reuters of the chicks chirping in his steel-roofed home in the Raposa Serra do Sol reserve. Although his mixed-race background was unusual, critics used it to question his credibility.

“Others say I can’t lead because I’m a woman.”

His drive for development – and Bolsonaro’s desire to activate it – goes far beyond questions about mining and material wealth. It challenged decades of government policies trying to deter intruders and sparked a historical debate over whether some of the world’s most isolated tribes should be integrated into modern society or left alone, along with the Amazon.

Larger than Western Europe and home to nearly all of Brazil’s indigenous lands, the world’s largest rainforest is a bulwark against climate change, its vegetation serving as a giant filter for greenhouse gases.

The native land makes up 13% of Brazil – a protected area roughly the size of Egypt. But with indigenous people making up less than 0.5% of Brazil’s population, agricultural and mining groups have long watched this low-population area voraciously.

It is unclear whether Bolsonaro’s bill will pass the tough Brazilian Congress or how profitable mining is on this land. But the timing has never been more favorable for the president, with allies recently winning leadership in both assemblies and the COVID-hit economy desperately in need of investment. Bolsonaro has made the bill a priority for 2021.

By working with several indigenous people, activists say he is exacerbating tensions within tribes through division and conquest methods that have historically helped destroy native lands around the world.

“Bolsonaro is using a colonial strategy,” said Antenor Vaz, a former veteran field agent for Brazil’s customary affairs agency Funai.

‘NEW EL DORADO’

The prospect of legalization has led thousands of prospectors to venture into indigenous territories.

The Bolsonaro bill lays down a regulatory framework to open up this area to legal mining for the first time. Controversially, it will not give indigenous peoples veto power.

Many indigenous communities continue to lead rural lifestyles, pursuing little modern development beyond small-scale agriculture. But Silva and people like him believe that natives have the same rights as other Brazilians to exploit their resources.

The state of Roraima, with a small mining industry due to its large reserves, is already attracting investors. Anastase Papoortzis, head of state development company Codesaima, told Reuters the company had 29 exploration permits in indigenous territories and would attend a mining fair in Canada this year.

“It’s been set for us to go and present Roraima as a new mining frontier, the new El Dorado,” he said.

Lust for treasure, and the destruction it causes, has shaped this northern part of the Amazon basin since the Europeans arrived in the 18th century. Early maps even place El Dorado, the legendary city of gold, somewhere between green hills and scarred purple stone.

Since then the seekers have come.

In the 1950s, Silva’s grandfather arrived from northeast Brazil to try his luck. He married a local Macuxi woman and started a family. Silva Celson’s father, now 68, has been out digging with his father since the age of eight.

Silva was also looking forward to his childhood, but only during the holidays because his father insisted he stay at school, walking three hours a day to attend class. “I’m still mine sometimes,” she said, “but it’s bad for my nails.”

In the 2000s, when he finished school and was trained to become a teacher, indigenous factions competed over how to protect their homeland. The struggle at Raposa Serra do Sol has become a symbol of the Brazilian debate on indigenous policies.

While the larger Roraima Adat Council (CIR) wants sustainable nature reserves that remove outsiders from the area, Silva’s Society for the Defense of the United Indians of Roraima (Sodiurr) believes peasants should be allowed to stay, defining tribal areas as islands in around them. property.

Sodiurr argues that rice and cow farmers, who moved there in the previous decades, brought jobs and development.

After April 15, 2005, when the government ratified the Raposa Serra do Sol as a sustainable nature reserve, many farmers resisted eviction. Sporadic attacks on indigenous enemies raged for several years, injuring more than a dozen people.

‘THERE WILL BE BLOOD’

Silva didn’t fight, but it did inform his politics.

After a tenure as a city councilor, he won the leadership election of Sodiurr in 2019 and amplified his pro-development, pro-integration message. As he put it: “Nobody here wants to walk around with their sobs.”

He has expanded their social media presence and aligned organizations with right-wing state and federal governments.

Membership has also increased, according to Silva. Seven communities have changed allegiance, leaving CIR to join him, while eight others are in conversation, he said. There are about 350 indigenous communities in the state.

Edinho Batista de Souza, a CIR leader, said he was not aware the community was changing sides.

“The presidency (Sodiurr) does not speak the same language as the people,” he told Reuters. “The government is trying to manipulate some of the leaders, including the president, but the bases don’t agree with this idea.”

Although Sodiurr’s membership is less than half the CIR, smaller organizations now have support in Brasilia.

“It’s an old problem, but they used to be in the minority, now they have the President of the Republic … now they are in power,” said Marcio Meira, a former head of Funai who worked closely with both sides during the demarcation.

Funai, responding to a Reuters question, said he did not know the size of each group or how they might change. He declined to comment on the competition, other than saying it did not condone violence.

Bolsonaro’s agenda appears to trigger change before a vote on his mining bill.

Near Napoleao, a customary town of 1,200 people in the mountains south of Raposa Serra do Sol, workers sweat from dawn to dusk, cutting deep into the rocks.

Some have pneumatic workouts, but most chase purple veins with only muscles and pickaxes. Miners of wood from the rock face, bent under the lucky sack.

The “mountains”, as the five feral cat mines are known, have been running since July 2019. It has driven the change that Silva so desperately wants.

The city gets 4% of mining profits, according to Carpejane Lima, 38, the town’s traditional leader and ally of Silva. The diggers took 74% and those with the machines to extract gold took the last 22%.

“The power company has cut off electricity because we can’t pay the bills,” said Lima, in the shade of a mango tree. Now a cavalry of diesel generators is turning next to the general store which is reopening. Across the street, there is a stand selling replica soccer shirts.

“We can make this a prosperous city,” said Lima, a 48 gram gold bracelet gleaming on her wrist.

But mining brings in outsiders. Some tribes have the skills or capital needed to crush and process ore. This arrival, say critics, brought drugs, prostitution and disease. Mercury, which is used to separate gold, also appears at alarming levels in the blood of some indigenous people.

Since Bolsonaro was elected, CIR said 2,000 miners had trespassed on Raposa Serra do Sol to work on mines like this. Silva emphasized that only the native wild in the country.

In a hole by the river near Silva’s house, where his father lived under a tarp for weeks, a small group dug in the scorching sun.

“We will fight for what is ours,” said Celson. “If people who don’t belong come here to try and stop us, there will be blood.”

Reporting by Stephen Eisenhammer; Additional reporting by Leonardo Benassatto; Edited by Brad Haynes and Andrew Cawthorne

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BHP and Aboriginal groups investigate collapsed rocks in Western Australia | Instant News


FILE PHOTOS: One tonne of nickel powder made by the BHP Group at a warehouse in Nickel West division, south of Perth, Australia 2 August 2019. Image taken 2 August 2019. REUTERS / Melanie Burton

MELBOURNE (Reuters) – The BHP Group has launched a joint investigation with Indigenous groups into what caused the rock fall in a rock shelter that is culturally important at its iron ore operations in Western Australia, the two groups said.

BHP discovered important site damage for the Banjima community on January 29, as part of monitoring at Mining Area C operations. It informed its Banjima partner and the groups agreed to carry out an investigation into the incident, President of BHP Minerals Australia, said Edgar Basto in a statement.

“This site is not part of the current mining operation. The cause of the fall is unknown, “Basto said in a statement late Tuesday.

Mining Area C is part of BHP’s $ 3.4 billion South Flank replacement project in the state’s Pilbara region.

The miners face closer scrutiny over what they are doing to protect sacred Indigenous sites after Rio Tinto’s destruction of two ancient sacred rock shelters in Juukan Gorge last May. The mining company has obtained permission to destroy the site.

Basto and Brandon Craig, head of BHP’s West Australia iron ore operations, met Elder Banjima as part of the Banjima Heritage Advisory Council that BHP formed last year after the Juukan Gorge incident.

“We will continue to work with Banjima in a spirit of mutual respect and cooperation,” said BHP.

The Banjima Native Title Aboriginal Corporation said it met with BHP executives on February 11 to clarify details in the initial report, and are continuing the investigation.

Reporting by Melanie Burton; Edited by Simon Cameron-Moore

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Huawei turned to the pig industry, mining industry, as smartphone sales are expected to drop by 60% in 2021 | Instant News






Huawei is now turning to pig farming and mining, as smartphone sales are expected to drop by 60% by 2021 (
Screenshot of Pexels official website
)

Although Huawei lost contact with American suppliers as early as 2019, Huawei could have become the world’s largest smartphone manufacturer, but the company has actually surpassed Apple and Samsung in 2020.

One day about a year later, the US Department of Commerce actually included Huawei on its list of entities, forcing the Chinese company to cease business with Google. Unexpectedly, those foundries using US-sourced technology are no longer allowed to ship to Huawei without permission.

Why does Huawei get involved in the pig industry?

according to PhoneArena’s storyAs early as November, Huawei sold its well-known Honor sub-brand to prevent the latter from being banned from acquiring certain chips and other US components because of its association with Huawei. Huawei actually received 15 billion U.S. dollars in compensation for the above-mentioned sales. This is very much needed. Huawei may still become the seventh largest smartphone manufacturer this year.

BBC report Huawei’s smartphone production may actually fall by 60% this year, although the reported company still cannot confirm any figures. The company is now looking for other sources of income, which is why it was brought to the pig industry. Unexpectedly, Huawei is now raising pigs or pigs.

According to reports, this is China’s main industry, and about 50% of the world’s live pigs or pigs are located here. Huawei also introduced the above-mentioned technology into the above-mentioned pig industry through facial recognition technology to identify individual pigs. The farm also uses other technologies to monitor pigs’ diet, exercise and weight.

Huawei Mining

A Huawei spokesperson discussed the technology company’s new entry into the pig industry. The spokesperson pointed out that pig raising is just another example of the company’s attempt to revitalize some traditional industries and ICT or information and communication technology to create added value for these industries in the current 5G era.

In addition to the pig industry, Huawei now hopes to expand its business and even get involved in the mining industry. The company’s founder and CEO Ren Zhengfei just opened a mining laboratory earlier this month.

Then, Ren hopes to use the new Huawei technology to transform these miners into ordinary white-collar workers and let them wear suits and ties to work. The executive subsequently added that the new Huawei mining will reduce workers, be equipped with higher safety and achieve higher efficiency.

Please also read: Huawei expects smartphone orders to fall by 60% to 70 million

By 2021, smartphone sales will decline

According to one TechSpot articlesAt present, the company is expected to sell only 700 to 80 million smartphones this year, compared to the previous 189 million in 2020 and 240 million in 2019.

This may be caused by the inclusion of the company on the list of entities by the US Department of Commerce.

related articles: Obama defends the US National Security Agency’s surveillance of Huawei-“Angry China” asks for explanation

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Written by Urian Buenconsejo







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