Tag Archives: mori

Watch: Jemaine Clement on whānau, racism and the New Zealand public | Instant News


In a rare television interview, Te Ao Māori Television with Moana meets one of New Zealand’s funniest and most creative people, Jemaine Clement. They talk about their early memories of growing up in Wairarapa, the differences between Kiwis and overseas audiences and more in the exclusive video above.

Of all the viewers in the world, Jemaine Clement considers Kiwi to be the toughest.

“They don’t expect anything good. People in the early days would say, ‘oh I really wanted to laugh, but nobody else started, so I decided not to’.”

A lot has happened in Clement’s life since those early days – Grammy awards; several Emmy nominations; acting credits to major Hollywood productions, including Men In Black III and the upcoming sequel to Avatar.

He also recently wrapped up the second season of the American mockumentary series, What We Do in the Shadows, which was named one of the best shows of 2020 by the New York Times.

In an emotional interview, Jemaine Clement opened up about her roots and career.  Photo / Māori TV
In an emotional interview, Jemaine Clement opened up about her roots and career. Photo / Māori TV

But Clement remains down to earth and less ego-like as ever, despite being named one of the 100 sexiest men by Australian Who magazine in 2008, and sometimes being mistaken for Benicio Del Toro.

Clement admits that he and his Flight of the Conchords bandmate, Bret McKenzie, were completely shocked when they became a hit with overseas audiences.

“When New Zealanders hear a New Zealand accent, they’re like, ‘Oh, I’m not going to hear this.’ But they don’t care [overseas]. So we were surprised… And when we played, our show got bigger and bigger. That was a big surprise. “

Clement spent his childhood growing up in Wairarapa, raised by Māori and kuia mothers.

She has fond memories of going on marae trips and meeting her Māori relatives at family reunions. But sadly, te reo wasn’t a big part of his upbringing.

“My grandmother doesn’t speak Māori. She’s from the generation who would be punished in school if she … that’s her first language, but, uh, you know, they’ll get hit if they talk,” he said, through tears.

Jemaine Clement has been open about racism, her upbringing at Wairarapa, and her recent work.  Photo / Māori TV
Jemaine Clement has been open about racism, her upbringing at Wairarapa, and her recent work. Photo / Māori TV

Her kuia greatly influenced her in other ways, such as through her sense of humor.

“She’s a funny woman … sometimes on purpose, like she’s going to make a good joke, and sometimes downright unintentionally … I mean the basic idea of ​​humor is to surprise, and she’s always surprising what to expect. he thought. “

Clement is still close to his mother – one year, he brought her to the Emmy as her guest, which he found very pleasant.

“He watches all these shows. I don’t watch them, I don’t know who the people are at the Emmy. But he knows all the shows.”

Over the past year, Covid has forced Clement to take stock and adopt a slower lifestyle, which is something he is grateful for.

“I think last year I realized I was pushing myself too much and doing too many things … So when everyone has to stop traveling, I appreciate it and take a step back and think, I don’t have to go too hard all the time,” he said. .

You can hear more about Clement’s thoughts on making fun of racism, when he meets the Prince in person, his writing process and more by watching the full interview with Moana Maniapoto in “Te Ao with Moana” at the top of this story.

.



image source

Goldie’s painting stolen during the Waikato heist was worth ‘over $ 1 million’ | Instant News


New Zealand artist CF Goldie’s Sleep ’tis a Gentle Thing’ was stolen along with many other unique works of art and antiques. Photo / NZ Police

A major seller of Goldie’s paintings in the country said a piece depicting a late Māori rangatira reportedly stolen today would be worth more than a million dollars.

The Waikato police are looking for information regarding the robbery, including a painting titled Sleep ’tis a Gentle Thing, by Ngāti Maru and chief Ngāti Paoa Hori Pokai, by New Zealand artist Charles Frederick Goldie.

Police believe it occurred in the Hamilton East area between 27 December 2020 and 3 January 2021.

Other artwork and antiques were stolen, including Koch & Bergfeld’s tableware.

Goldie’s most expensive piece, A Noble Relic of a Noble Race, from chief Ngāti Manawa Wharekauri Tahuna, sold for $ 1,337,687 at an International Arts Center auction in Auckland in 2016.

Director Richard Thomson said he sold another version of the stolen painting in 2008 for a record price of $ 454,000.

“So that’s a million dollars plus artwork that’s on the market today. I’ve sold dozens of Goldies, and it’s a really good example of his work, it has all the advantages.

“I’m quite annoyed [the burglary]. This is a very important national treasure. The owner is the keeper, but the country owns it, really. “

The stolen painting was most likely done between 1933 and 1938, when Goldie was in his sixties.

While Goldie’s previous work tends to fetch the highest price, Thomson says the 2016 record was set in 1941.

Despite his high ratings, Thomson said he thought it would be “worthless” in the hands of the thief.

“There is absolutely no market for it now in the wrong hands. It’s a stupid thing to do and all they’ll get is bad karma.

“My advice is to come back as quickly and safely as possible.”

Webb auction house art chief Charles Ninow said another version of the painting was sold, at a different auction house, in 2012 for $ 280,000.

He believes in today’s market it will be worth “easily over $ 500,000”.

“I remember selling it at a higher than average price, but the market has since been wild for Goldie. His art is just one of those things whose value goes up every year.”

New Zealand artist CF Goldie's Sleep 'tis a Gentle Thing' was stolen along with many other unique works of art and antiques.  Photo / NZ Police
New Zealand artist CF Goldie’s Sleep ’tis a Gentle Thing’ was stolen along with many other unique works of art and antiques. Photo / NZ Police

Ninow said he thought it would be rated a little lower than the previous work because of Goldie’s age at the time.

“When he was younger in his career he was in a better mental state, and did this very detailed painting. As they get older they become a little more poetic, looser, and that can affect grades.”

Having such a painting stolen would be of great concern not only to the owner, but also to Māori, who regarded the depiction of tūpuna, the ancestor, as “embodying vairua, soul, nurturer”.

“So, stealing it and not knowing it exists is a huge loss for Aotearoa, for our culture and our nation.”

The painting is entitled "The Woman in the Red Hat" also stolen from Hamilton's address.  Photo / NZ Police
A painting entitled “Lady With Red Hat” was also stolen from Hamilton’s address. Photo / NZ Police

Ninow said the thieves likely knew what they were doing.

“His works were instantly recognizable, he was very famous, like Colin McCahon. Everyone knows them, and very much sought after. If you’ve seen him in person, it’s very different to you.”

But Ninow believes that it is “impossible” to sell underground.

“The New Zealand art market is bigger than most people think, but it’s still small, and unlikely to be sold through traditional channels. Once it is known that a work has dubious origins, no one will touch it.

“With the stolen works, we often never know what happened to them. They move through these underground channels and we never see them again, but I really hope that doesn’t happen and we can see them again.”

Another painting was stolen.  Photo / NZ Police
Another painting was stolen. Photo / NZ Police

The police asked members of the public for information or possible sightings of the stolen items.

“This is definitely a very special legacy and we want to return it to its owner as quickly as possible,” said Constable Ben Monk of Hamilton’s Tactical Crime Unit.

“If you have information, please call the police on 105 and excerpt file 210103/2961.

“Alternatively, you can call Crime Stoppers on 0800 555 111.”

.



image source

Rugby League: Melbourne Storm, Māori New Zealand winger Sandor Earl announces his retirement | Instant News


Sports

Melbourne Storm Star Sandor Earl. Photo / Getty

Melbourne Storm winger Sandor Earl has announced his retirement from NRL, effective immediately.

The 31-year-old confirmed the news while speaking at SEN’s Jimmy Smith Show on Friday afternoon.

“I’m going to hang up my shoes,” Earl said.

“I think a combination of things, but I think the people who know me and are closest to me have a pretty good understanding … the rugby league has been everything for me.

“This is a dream come true, it is what I have dedicated all my life, and I am very proud, even considering a rollercoaster, proud of the things I have accomplished.

“It tore a bit of a bandaid moment. Transitions are never easy but there are so many things I want to do off the pitch … I think there’s another life I want to pursue.

“I am not old, I am 31, and no doubt I believe I can contribute on the pitch.

“But I really want to dedicate my 30s to starting this journey to create something really special. I haven’t done enough, but I know it will be good and it will be fun.”

Earl played 56 first-class matches after making his NRL debut for the Sydney Roosters in 2009.

His career was hampered by a four-year suspension for using performance-enhancing substances, but Storm gave him the opportunity to return to NRL in 2018.

Plagued by injuries, Earl has played eight games in the last two seasons, scoring three attempts for Melbourne.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, Earl has been limited to a few games this year.

Born in Wellington, Earl also played one match for New Zealand’s Māori rugby league team in 2010.

.



image source