Tag Archives: mutation

Merkel warned of a third wave of coronavirus in Germany | Instant News


BERLIN

German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Thursday warned of a more aggressive third wave of the coronavirus and defended her government’s cautious approach to loosening the lockdown in the country.

Merkel told the daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung that the easing of restrictions should be gradual and also be considered with caution because of the more infectious and dangerous mutations identified in recent months.

“With this [new mutations], we are entering a new phase of the pandemic, from which a third wave might emerge, “said Merkel.

He underlined that the British variant virus is more aggressive than the original, and will likely become the dominant variant in Germany.

“Therefore, we must take smart and careful steps now so that the third wave does not lead to a complete halt across Germany,” he added.

Earlier this month, Merkel’s government and prime ministers from 16 federal states agreed to extend the country’s tight lockdown measures through March 7.

They set a goal of reducing infections to a maximum of 35 cases per 100,000 people over a seven-day period to relax restrictions. Currently the country’s seven-day incidence rate is 61.7 cases per 100,000 population.

Germany has managed to bring the number of daily coronavirus cases below 15,000 this month, but its death toll is much higher than in previous months.

The Robert Koch Institute reported on Thursday 11,869 new infections and 385 deaths in the country, suggesting that the outbreak is far from under control.

Germany currently has the fifth highest infection count in Western Europe, behind Britain, France, Spain and Italy.

The national total reached more than 2.4 million cases with at least 69,125 deaths.


The Anadolu Agency website contains only a portion of the news offered to subscribers on the AA News Broadcasting System (HAS), and is in summary form. Please contact us for subscription options.

.



image source

Another Covid-19 variant with an alarming series of mutations found in the UK: Report | Instant News


University of Edinburgh researchers have revealed that another variant of the coronavirus with a series of alarming mutations has been observed in the UK, The Guardian reports.

The variant, called B1525, has been identified through genome sequencing in 10 countries including Denmark, the US and Australia. The UK has so far reported 32 cases of this variant.

Also read: The new study found 7 variants of Covid-19 in the US, carrying the same mutation

The researchers say in their study, published in the covlineages.org report, that the earliest sequences of this variant date to December 2020 and appear in the UK and Nigeria.

The team found that the variant has similarities in its genome to Kent’s variant, B117. But this new variant contains a number of mutations that have researchers uneasy.

These include the E484K mutation, also found in the South African variant – on a spike protein – a protein found outside the virus that plays an important role in helping the virus enter cells.

Also read: Most people have natural immunity to Covid-19, the study found

Dr Simon Clarke, a professor of cellular microbiology at the University of Reading, said, as quoted in the Guardian report: “We don’t yet know how well this (new) variant will spread, but if it works, it could be considered immunity from previous vaccines or infections. will decrease. “

He added: “I think until we find out more about this variant, any variant that carries the E484K will have to undergo surge testing as it appears to provide resistance to immunity, however it is produced.”

.



image source

The study found 7 newly identified variants of COVID-19 circulating in the United States | Instant News


Researchers said on Sunday that they had identified a similar set of disturbing mutations in samples of the coronavirus circulating in the United States. They don’t just get their attention; they have found better abbreviations to refer to them. They named it after the bird.

The mutations all affect the same range of spike proteins – the button-like extensions on the outside of the virus that it uses to anchor to infected cells. write the researchers in preprinted reports. These have not been peer reviewed, but researchers are rushing to find such findings online to share them quickly with other experts.

The genetic range that mutates, or changes, is called 677. The changes are so similar that researchers think evolution supports this particular variant. And that’s in a troubling place, said Vaughn Cooper, director of the Center for Evolutionary Biology and Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, which worked on the study.

“The stretch of the Spike is important because of its proximity to a key region for virulence,” Cooper told CNN by email.

“We actually consider these mutations to be relatively rare (compared to other types of mutations), but they are disproportionately selected when they occur later,” he added.

The US average daily COVID-19 cases fell below 100,000 for the first time in months

The team has reviewed the genome sequences stored in GISAID, a global database that researchers use to share genetic information about the virus. This is where scientists first noticed the emergence of disturbing new variants such as B.1.1.7, first seen in Great Britain, and B.1.351, first seen in South Africa.

“By the end of January 2021, our two independent SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance programs, based at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences in Albuquerque, New Mexico and the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, Louisiana, each saw an increasing number of … a virus carrying the S: Q677P mutation, and this variant has increased in the frequency of samples collected in late 2020 to mid-January, “write the researchers.

What if COVID-19 never goes away? What scientists say about the future of viruses

The abbreviation – Q677P – refers to a specific change in the amino acids that make up that part of the spike protein.
They had identified seven similar mutations in 677 – each apparently occurring independently. They named it after the bird to make it easier to identify.

One, called Robin 1, has appeared in more than 30 US states, dominating the Midwest, they said. The second “first emerged from the October 6, 2020 sample from Alabama and was named ‘Robin 2’ because of its resemblance to the parent sub-line Robin 1,” they wrote. This is especially evident in the Southeast. The so-called Pelican was first seen in samples from Oregon, and has since appeared in 12 other states as well as Australia, Denmark, Switzerland and India.

The Pelican was the first variant that caught the attention of researchers, in part because it was found in nearly 28% of samples from Louisiana and 11% of samples from New Mexico.

“The remaining Q677H sub-lineages each contain about 100 or fewer sequences, and are named: Yellowhammer, detected mostly in the southeastern US; Bluebird, mostly in the northeastern United States; Quail, especially in the Southwest and Northeast. and Mockingbird, especially in the states of south-central and East coast, “wrote the research team.

Can your employer force you to get vaccinated? The answer may surprise you

The United States has barely studied the genome sequences of the circulating coronavirus, so if these variants appear so frequently in the database, they are likely very common, the researchers said. The appearance of so many similar mutations at the same time was “extraordinary,” they said.

“This variant was not detected until mid-August 2020, but as of February 3, 2021, it already includes more than 2,327 of the 102,462 genomes stored in the US GISAID,” they wrote. It deserves attention, they say.

.



image source

The study found 7 newly identified variants of COVID-19 circulating in the United States | Instant News


Researchers said on Sunday that they had identified a similar set of disturbing mutations in samples of the coronavirus circulating in the United States. They don’t just get their attention; they have found better abbreviations to refer to them. They named it after the bird.

The mutations all affect the same range of spike proteins – the button-like extensions on the outside of the virus that it uses to anchor to infected cells. write the researchers in preprinted reports. These have not been peer reviewed, but researchers are rushing to find such findings online to share them quickly with other experts.

The genetic range that mutates, or changes, is called 677. The changes are so similar that researchers think evolution supports this particular variant. And that’s in a troubling place, said Vaughn Cooper, director of the Center for Evolutionary Biology and Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, which worked on the study.

“The stretch of the Spike is important because of its proximity to a key region for virulence,” Cooper told CNN by email.

“We actually consider these mutations to be relatively rare (compared to other types of mutations), but they are disproportionately selected when they occur later,” he added.

The US average daily COVID-19 cases fell below 100,000 for the first time in months

The team has reviewed the genome sequences stored in GISAID, a global database that researchers use to share genetic information about the virus. This is where scientists first noticed the emergence of disturbing new variants such as B.1.1.7, first seen in Great Britain, and B.1.351, first seen in South Africa.

“By the end of January 2021, our two independent SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance programs, based at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences in Albuquerque, New Mexico and the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport, Louisiana, each saw an increasing number of … a virus carrying the S: Q677P mutation, and this variant has increased in the frequency of samples collected in late 2020 to mid-January, “write the researchers.

What if COVID-19 never goes away? What scientists say about the future of viruses

The abbreviation – Q677P – refers to a specific change in the amino acids that make up that part of the spike protein.
They had identified seven similar mutations in 677 – each apparently occurring independently. They named it after the bird to make it easier to identify.

One, called Robin 1, has appeared in more than 30 US states, dominating the Midwest, they said. The second “first emerged from the October 6, 2020 sample from Alabama and was named ‘Robin 2’ because of its resemblance to the parent sub-line Robin 1,” they wrote. This is especially evident in the Southeast. The so-called Pelican was first seen in samples from Oregon, and has since appeared in 12 other states as well as Australia, Denmark, Switzerland and India.

The Pelican was the first variant that caught the attention of researchers, in part because it was found in nearly 28% of samples from Louisiana and 11% of samples from New Mexico.

“The remaining Q677H sub-lineages each contain about 100 or fewer sequences, and are named: Yellowhammer, detected mostly in the southeastern US; Bluebird, mostly in the northeastern United States; Quail, especially in the Southwest and Northeast. and Mockingbird, especially in the states of south-central and East coast, “wrote the research team.

Can your employer force you to get vaccinated? The answer may surprise you

The United States has barely studied the genome sequences of the circulating coronavirus, so if these variants appear so frequently in the database, they are likely very common, the researchers said. The appearance of so many similar mutations at the same time was “extraordinary,” they said.

“This variant was not detected until mid-August 2020, but as of February 3, 2021, it already includes more than 2,327 of the 102,462 genomes stored in the US GISAID,” they wrote. It deserves attention, they say.

.



image source

Three people tested positive for the British variant of COVID-19 at Davidson College | Instant News


“Our contact tracing and quarantine have worked effectively, and many of our positive test results have come from students who have been quarantined from across campus,” read a statement from the school. “However, as you will read below, the variants – of which there are at least four concerns – will continue to reach the campus. Although the virus is slightly different, the ways to prevent it are the same: a mask, 6 feet distance, and washing your hands. “

.



image source