Tag Archives: night

A cooler night is coming as the mercury drops to 6 ° C again | Instant News



Mercury fell to six degrees Celsius in Karachi on Monday morning under the influence of a cold wave that swept across the country today, the Pakistan Meteorological Department said.

The Met Office added that the cold wave will continue until at least January 16 in the port city. “Under the influence of the cold north wind, mercury fell to 6 ° C on Monday morning and this weather pattern will most likely continue until January 16. After that, the nighttime temperature will most likely remain between 10-11 degrees Celsius,” said Sardar. Sarfraz, Sindh’s chief meteorological officer.

The Met Office predicts cool nights in Karachi this week with temperatures hovering between 6 and 8 degrees Celsius. The weather is likely to cool again later this month due to western disturbances.

“We expect another western wave later this month, which will bring rain and snow to the north and over the country in the third week of this month. This wave will be followed by extremely cold weather in the country and under its influence, it will cool down again at the end of this month and from next month, ”said Sarfraz.

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Many areas of Karachi remained without electricity until Sunday evening | Instant News


After power cuts across the country on Saturday night, parts of Karachi remained without power until Sunday evening as efforts to restore electricity continued.

Electricity cannot be restored to many areas such as Nazimabad, North Nazimabad, North Karachi, Surjani City and parts of the East and South Districts until the night.

The city’s sole electricity supplier, K-Electric (KE), said in a statement that the nationwide power outage due to a national grid blackout was flowing into the KE grid and affected Karachi’s electricity supply as well.

The power company claims that since midnight 12, his team has been working to restore electricity to the city. By evening, according to a KE spokesperson, the electricity supply from the national grid could be continued through the existing connection points with KE.

The power company said its team was ready to handle any customer complaints it received at its 118 call centers.

Meanwhile, Energy Minister Sindh Imtiaz Sheikh said the massive power outage across the country was simply the incapacity of the federal power ministry.

Even after 12 hours, he pointed out in a statement, the federal ministry could not find the right fault. He demanded that the chairman of the National Transmission and Shipping Company (NTDC) be suspended immediately and a questionnaire committee formed to investigate the matter. Sheikh said it was a matter of great concern for state institutions that the whole country fell into darkness just because of one power plant.

He regretted that due to the lack of provincial representation in NTDC, there were no checks and balances. The federal government, he said, was ignoring the need to improve mechanisms for distributing power over two and a half years in office. The only job the federal government is doing is blaming the previous government, said Sindh’s energy minister.

Meanwhile, the Karachi Water and Waste Disposal Agency (KWSB) said that its main water pump station experienced a disruption after the power went out, resulting in the water supply to the city being cut off.

Only small distribution pumping stations, according to a water council spokesman, can run on generators. On Sunday evening, the water board said that with the restoration of electricity, the water supply was resumed to various parts of the city.

KWSB Managing Director Asadullah Khan said that as long as the power goes out, the city cannot receive around 357 million gallons of water. “The water board will take all steps to fill the water supply gap,” he said.

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At 5.8 ° C, Karachi had another cold night of the season | Instant News


People in Karachi had a particularly cold night when mercury fell to another 5.8 degrees Celsius on Saturday morning, the Pakistan Meteorological Department said, adding that winter would continue for at least another week.

“Under the influence of the Siberian wind, the temperature fell to 5.8 ° C on Saturday morning,” said Chief Meteorological Officer Sindh Sardar Sarfaraz. “This is the second time the temperature has dropped below 6 ° C this month. On January 1, a minimum temperature of 5.8 ° C was recorded. “

Sarfaraz said that under the influence of the Siberian wind, the whole country was in the grip of the cold wind. Noting that the temperature had dropped below 6 ° C twice this month, he warned that winter would last in the city for at least another week.

He said the weather in Karachi is likely to remain cold and dry until January 15 or 16, with minimum temperatures ranging between 6 ° C and 9 ° C, adding that there is no chance of rain for at least the next two weeks.

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Waikeria Uprising: Witnesses report new fires in prison as protests continue | Instant News


Adrien Disher, who lives near the Waikeria Prison, said he saw another fire in Waikeria last night.

A new fire broke out in the Waikeria Prison last night, according to an eye witness, after several days of rioting at the facility.

A group of 16 inmates are still avoiding arrest on the roof of the prison after starting riots and lighting a destructive fire in the prison yard on Tuesday afternoon.

Adrian Disher, who lives about 3 km from the prison, said the fires only started last night and he saw emergency services heading to the scene around 7pm.

“It’s quite big, up in the treetops.”

“This must be a new one,” he said.

Fire and Emergency New Zealand directs requests about reported fires to Corrections.

Meanwhile, a former negotiator earlier yesterday said it was “unthinkable” that the fighting had been going on for so long.

Correction said the men had gained access to tactical equipment including shields and body armor, and made homemade weapons for use against prison staff.

With 13 years of experience dealing with crisis negotiations under his belt, Lance Burdett knows the importance of trying to limit situations to two or three days.

The Waikeria prison near Te Awamutu was smoldering after a night of fire as the prisoners continued to riot.  Photo / NEWSHUB
The Waikeria prison near Te Awamutu was smoldering after a night of fire as the prisoners continued to riot. Photo / NEWSHUB

“The longer it takes, the more likely it won’t end well,” he said.

“People are being assertive – they are not going to give a little.”

Burdett, who runs consultancy Warn International, has studied events around the world and said history books show how the siege is getting worse.

The golden rule of negotiation emphasizes getting the other person to talk and listen.

“Don’t be afraid to give something away,” added Burdett.

He admits conflicting traditions, but says being the first to offer something creates goodwill.

There are concerns over the structural integrity of the Waikeria Prison buildings following the significant damage caused by the riots.  Photo / NEWSHUB
There are concerns over the structural integrity of the Waikeria Prison buildings following the significant damage caused by the riots. Photo / NEWSHUB

“That applies to human nature. If I buy you a drink, the first thing you want to do, apart from drinking it, is buy me another one.”

He also said it was important that arrangements be made “honest and respectful”.

“Never lie, once you lie, you’ve lost all credibility.”

He praised the Penitentiary for allowing inmates to speak with parents and deputy leader of the Māori Party, Rawiri Waititi.

The inmates have asked to speak with the vice chairman of the Māori Party, Rawiri Waititi.  Photo / Andrew Warner
The inmates have asked to speak with the vice chairman of the Māori Party, Rawiri Waititi. Photo / Andrew Warner

“Both are very good choices and I commend them for doing that.”

However, he said old school tactics such as trying to starve rioters were unlikely to get good results.

“You just add fuel to the fire.”

Something had to happen to break the deadlock.

“Now the Correctional Center is in a position where the prison is basically being held for ransom by a group of individuals. They have to move at some point.

“This is not the only prison in New Zealand. There are other prisons and they will look at this and see what the response is.”

The correction was confirmed last night that inmates deliberately activated sprinklers in the cell on three occasions yesterday – twice at Mt Eden Remand Prison and once at Rimutaka Prison.

Fire and emergency response and prisoners secured in new cells.

The Herald asked Correction whether it was concerned about copycat behavior among inmates after the Waikeria Prison riots and what precautions the department was taking to monitor and suppress such behavior.

Correction said it could not respond last night, but added “no incidents of copycat behavior”.

Last night, Waititi said he had been contacted by the inmates’ whānau who said the men were only willing to surrender if he was present.

“They don’t trust the authorities and believe they will be harmed after surrendering,” he said.

“They have stated that they would come out with body bags if I was not there to escort them out and ensure their safety.

“This is a protest, not a riot.”

Waititi said he had tried to contact Minister of Corrections Kelvin Davis but was blocked from accessing the prison a second time.

“The law allows the right for every member of parliament to visit prisons and communicate with inmates regarding their treatment in prison or complaints about treatment,” Waititi said.

“The purpose of my first visit was not to negotiate surrender. I went to listen.”

The aim of the second visit is to ensure the safety of the 16 people when they surrender, he said.

“If this situation turns into custard and if there are fatalities – it is entirely on the Government.”

Opposition lawmakers are demanding Government intervention to end the crisis, with
National Party leader Judith Collins asked Davis to step up.

On Twitter, he chided Davis for not making a public statement in favor of Corrections staff “dealing with violent prison riots” in Waikeria.

“Let’s be clear. The mass destruction of taxpayer-funded property, assaults of correctional staff and stockpiling of weapons are not ‘peaceful protests’,” he wrote, too.

Davis needs to explain how the loss of control happened and what he will do to fix it, Collins said.

“He was very happy bragging about prison in opposition but now that he’s in charge, he’s nowhere to be seen.”

Riot inmates at the Waikeria Prison have been in hiding since setting fire to the facility on Tuesday afternoon.  Photo / NEWSHUB
Riot inmates at the Waikeria Prison have been in hiding since setting fire to the facility on Tuesday afternoon. Photo / NEWSHUB

A spokesman for Davis said he would not comment or visit the prison until the situation was resolved.

Maori Council executive director Matthew Tukaki called for calm amid rising tensions.

He asks politicians to step down and allow manau to work with correctionals, prisoners and whanau to resolve the situation quickly.

“The issues being handled are complex and in the interests of the safety of all parties involved, we have to resolve this situation and be on time.

“Health and safety risks to workers and prisoners need to be addressed as do the broader concerns of all involved.

“The reality is that the prison may have reached its use by date and in time to discuss its future – but that can only happen against the backdrop of a swift resolution to the current impasse.”

Incident supervisor Jeanette Burns yesterday said 16 prisoners continued to light significant fires.

Police at Waikeria Prison near Te Awamutu as fighting continues between the inmates and guards.  Photo / Michael Craig
Police at Waikeria Prison near Te Awamutu as fighting continues between the inmates and guards. Photo / Michael Craig

“We are very committed to ensuring that this is resolved safely,” he said.

“There are many risks involved, including the structural integrity of buildings damaged by fire, the weapons and equipment available to detainees, the toxicity of the burning building materials, and the violence offered by detainees.”

Negotiations with the group are ongoing, he said.

On Friday, Correction confirmed the unrest experienced by inmates gain access to power tools and tactical equipment as well as making emergency weapons.

Protesting prisoners have also accessed medical pharmacies where controlled medicines are stored.

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Dramatic photos show injured hikers climbing ropes to mountains in Aoraki / Mt Cook National Park before being rescued | Instant News


The two climbers were before they saved. One of them had a badly broken arm and was tied to the side of a mountain. Photo / Provided

Two climbers – one seriously injured – spent one night in Aoraki / Mt Cook National Park as rescuers departed complicated mission to take them to safety.

The climbers were trapped by a rock slide on steep terrain on Wednesday evening and weather conditions hindered rescue efforts, but a lull in the clouds early Thursday allowed the helicopter crew to unload an alpine cliff rescue team.

A Greymouth Rescue Helicopter then flew the couple – a man and a woman in their 50s – to Greymouth Hospital.

The man’s arm was badly broken in two places, a concussion and a badly injured leg. The woman was relatively unscathed, and she had tied the injured climber to the steep slope to prevent her from falling and suffering further injuries.

The two climbers were before they saved.  One of them had a badly broken arm and was tied to the side of a mountain.  Photo / Provided
The two climbers were before they saved. One of them had a badly broken arm and was tied to the side of a mountain. Photo / Provided

New Zealand’s Maritime rescue coordination center is leading a complex rescue. Search mission coordinator Neville Blakemore said the climbers activated the danger warning function of their InReach device at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday following the rock slide.

The rescue was completed at 8:50 a.m. on Thursday when the climbers arrived at Greymouth Hospital, having been flown there in a rescue helicopter.

Blakemore said being able to activate the device may have saved the wounded
a climber’s life. The pair were well equipped for the terrain they were on.

On Wednesday evening, the coordination center requested Helicopter Line helicopters to fly from Aoraki / Mt Cook with the Department of Conservation’s alpine cliff rescue team.

A lull in the clouds early Thursday allowed the helicopter crew to drop off the alpine cliff rescue team.  Photo / Provided
A lull in the clouds early Thursday allowed the helicopter crew to drop off the alpine cliff rescue team. Photo / Provided

They were unable to get to the site of the rock slide at an altitude of 1,800 meters on Mount D’Archiac (50 km northeast of Aoraki / Mt Cook) due to thick clouds. Instead, they landed a rescue team at Godley Hut to wait the night, monitor the weather and stay in touch with the coordination center.

The center has helicopters with night flying equipment on standby in Christchurch and
Greymouth.

Low clouds prevented Christchurch helicopters from flying, but at 3 a.m. on Thursday, during a lull in the clouds in the mountains, Greymouth Rescue Helicopters were able to fly to the scene and bring down an alpine cliff rescue team.

The two climbers were flown to Greymouth Hospital at around 7.30am.

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