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Study: masks and travel limits pay off for Blackfeet national news | Instant News


Stay-at-home orders and mask warrants helped the Blackfeet tribe crush a second wave of COVID-19 infections and led to the reopening of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation to public travel this spring, according to a news report. study. do to use the resilience it has to protect itself, ”Missoula County health director Ellen Leahy said of the study published in the Centers for Disease Control Morbidity and Mortality weekly report, released Friday. “If a community decides they have the political will to get out of this pandemic, they can do it.” The Blackfoot tribe was one of the first communities in Montana to react aggressively to the pandemic last March. In particular, the Blackfeet Tribal Business Council has taken action to protect the few dozen people who are fluent in their language. Losing them to a highly infectious respiratory disease threatened the loss of their traditional culture, according to tribal spokesperson James McNeely. Here’s a look at Johnson & Johnson’s COVID vaccination program and the setbacks it experienced along the way. Responses included a ban on all non-residential traffic within the reserve, including tourists wishing to use the eastern entrances to Glacier National Park. Residents were required to wear masks in public and refrain from all public activity, but extremely necessary. The reservation remained almost COVID-free for much of the early spring and summer of 2020. But the use of the spa relaxed. summer camping with gatherings at the Kalispell Northwest Montana Fair and Rodeo and over Labor Day weekend, cases have increased 63 times more than reported in July. Coronavirus infections struck nearly one in 10 Native Americans on the reserve between June 16 and December 10. After a new stay-at-home order was issued on September 28, infections fell by a factor of 33 – by 6.4 cases per 1,000 residents from October 5 to 0.19 before November 7. Keeping the eastern entrances to Glacier National Park closed, moving all students to distance learning for the fall semester, and providing a Thanksgiving meal to each household to reduce trips to the grocery store may also have contributed to the success, according to the report. “The strictly enforced stay-at-home order, with increased penalties, likely contributed to the more than thirty-fold decrease in incidence by November 7,” the report said. “The sharp drop in the incidence of COVID-19 in the Blackfeet Tribal Reservation may not have happened without widespread and consistent application of the mask use mandate in public and stay-at-home orders . ” The study also found that the first people in the Blackfoot community to fall ill after the rules were relaxed in August were among young people, followed by a second wave of infections among those aged 50 to 65. About 85% of transmissions occurred within households among the Pieds-Noirs, compared to 22% of transmission within households among the Montanais in general. In addition to the physical restrictions, the Pieds-Noirs also acted quickly to immunize their population. Last month, the Tribal Business Council reopened the Glacier Park border and general activity reservation, though masks and social distancing are still needed. “If you look at county by county, look at counties with Indian reservations – they all have higher rates of vaccination than counties that don’t,” Leahy said. “And the highest vaccination rate is Blackfeet. It’s very high. They reached far in the estimated immunity of the herd. The study authors recognized several limitations. These included a possible misclassification of infections from two separate COVID testing systems, combining reports from multiple agencies and limited data on household, workplace and community circumstances on the reservation. .



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Brood X’s cicadas will not spawn in the north; journey down state required to experience massive emergence | Local News | Instant News


TRAVERSE CITY – A large X brood of cicadas will emerge from the ground after 17 years and start crying trees – but in the north, residents must travel down to enjoy the thrill. with the big clutches, ”said entomologist Duke Elsner, retired Michigan State University Extension educator. Northern Michigan has annual cicadas that come out in cycles each year, a different brood each year for four or five years. “Basically there isn’t enough of it to be really loud,” Elsner said. Annual cicadas are larger and usually black with undertones of green and white, he said, but without the characteristic red eyes of periodic cicadas that emerge by the millions after The Brood X phenomenon – pronounced Brood 10 – will return in parts of southern Michigan this year, scientists say, mostly along the southern state border as well as in Jackson and Washtenaw counties. There are periodic 17 year old cicadas in the Traverse City area and people there will have to travel to Ann Arbor or further south of the United States if they are to experience this mass emergence, ” said Gary Parsons, head of the Arthropod collection at MSU. Research Collection and Director of the MSU Bug House.Cicadas are a type of insect that is distinguished from other species or insects by having their mouthparts modified into the shape of a slender, hinged beak to suck fluids, a-t- he declares. but are not toxic or injurious to people or animals. “Cicadas do not bite and are harmless to humans and property – other than being a nuisance. They can pile up in millions in parks, woods and neighborhoods and seemingly be everywhere. When they’re this plentiful, they fly, land and crawl all over the place, including sometimes landing on humans, ”Parsons said. Female cicadas insert and lay their eggs in thin twigs of trees and shrubs after mating. “When the tiny nymphs hatch, they drop to the ground, burrowing into the ground, then find a root to suck in fluids for the next 13 or 17. Parsons said. The university scientist said Brood X is the largest and most widespread brood in the United States, and the only periodic brood that emerges in Michigan. “As far as I know, the only population that still exists in Michigan is down around Ann Arbor, ”Parsons said. After this year, Brood X won’t reappear until 2038, he said. cycles, due to global warming trends. Insects typically emerge when the soil temperature is 64 degrees and after a rain.Climate Central, a nonprofit news organization that analyzes and reports on climate science, has calculated average soil temperatures across the country. area of ​​emergence of Brood X. It is estimated that Brood X cicadas will emerge between five and 10 days – even up to 15 days or more in parts of the range – earlier than in previous cycles, scientists from the group said. Counties expected to see the bulk of Brood X’s emergence include Branch, Jackson, and St. Joseph, according to a US Forest Service map of planned activity this year. Other sources also include parts of Berrien, Cass, Hillsdale and Washtenaw counties in the cicada landing zone. .



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FOIA Presents Travel Voucher Idea for Owners of PFAS Contaminated Wells in East Bay Township | Local News | Instant News


TRAVERSE CITY – Travel vouchers to offset costs associated with public water connections for affected residents have been launched as part of discussions around an investigation into PFAS water contamination in the Township of East Bay. Grand Traverse County Board Chairman Rob Hentschel suggested in an email to Cherry Capital According to information released to Record-Eagle under Michigan’s Freedom of Information Act, Hentschel mentioned the concept before local leaders get grant funds to pay. the 18 public connections required for the affected homes still use well water; the idea was that if the grant funds could not be acquired, perhaps the travel vouchers could be a compromise – an authorized use of restricted airport dollars. Some of the affected residents and environmental experts criticized the suggestion as being irresponsible in the face of revelations about contaminated drinking water and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Local officials, however, said it was the result of brainstorming and was never intended for the public. Clean Water, Travel Vouchers The email in question with the line of subject line “$ 3,900 PFAS Travel Voucher” was sent Nov 9 from Hentschel to airport manager Keven Klein and read: “Random thought … sitting at the East Bay twp meeting … If we don’t can’t pay for the capping of neighboring wells and municipal water hooks … can we run a promotion with the airlines for the travel vouchers in You’ll be happy to know they haven’t thrown the airport under the bus. Not a single mention of the airport … – Rob “Some residents and concerned environmental experts have said that such a travel voucher idea is reprehensible.” It would have been an insult, “said Joyce Lundberg, whose well water for her home along Indian Trail Boulevard was among those contaminated with PFAS chemicals.” What would we do with travel vouchers in the midst of a pandemic ? We wanted clean water. ”Liz Kirkwood, executive director of the nonprofit For Love Of Water, said she was initially“ a little speechless ”when she learned the suggestion of travel vouchers for those with contaminated wells FLOW is a Traverse City-based organization that advocates for groundwater protection and will host a webinar on March 10 on threats to Michigan’s groundwater resources. communities by PFAS said the emerging family of chemical contaminants holds untold potential for problems of environmental injustice – especially given its long-term and widespread use at d he industrial, aeronautical and commercial purposes and the way pollutants are increasingly present in drinking water. way to have a drink of your refreshing well water and know if it’s contaminated with PFAS, ”said Alissa Cordner, as a sociological professor of sociology at Whitman College in Washington and co-director of the PFAS Project Lab with researchers at Northeastern University in Boston, she said that often communities subject to PFAS contamination have historically experienced other types of pollution and tend not to be wealthy. Pine Grove mirrors this trend with its blue collar workers and history of a TCE plume, which prompted public water to flow through the neighborhood decades ago, but not all connected homes back then. not always in a financial position to do much about it, indicating the need for broader systemic changes in the way toxic chemicals are produced and used. people affected by pollution, she said an offer of “It seems clear to me that a small travel voucher and continued contamination of drinking water is not up to the mark,” Cordner said. Hentschel said his email to the airport manager should be considered in perspective; it was a private email not intended for public presentation, he said. “There is no evidence that it came from the airport, but we wanted to do something,” Hentschel said. Because airport funds are limited to airport operations and promotion, he said the suggestion was right that he was looking for ways to help affected residents. “These are raw ideas,” Hentschel said, later adding that the idea “was not to ride. For the public, but to think outside the box.” Klein also said Hentschel’s idea was an attempt to come up with a solution through brainstorming. But it wouldn’t have been appropriate to make that offer to affected residents, he said. “I think what he was trying to say was that ‘is “we have to be more creative” “said the airport manager. said they might have actually taken advantage of such a travel voucher, if subsidies had not been found to pay for their public water hookups. But that wouldn’t fly for everyone. “I appreciate Rob’s efforts for sure,” said Hillerie Rettelle, who lives on Avenue B and whose well has returned a collective. of more than 840 pieces per trillion of PFAS chemicals – as many as 35 times that of the state. Rettelle said Hentschel has worked Hard to get public water connections as quickly as possible for affected residents and tried to help them get back the money they spent preparing for public water connections when they were not satisfied to wait for government action. As much as she could appreciate a travel voucher, Rettelle said she knew not all affected residents were able to use it. Some would not have connected to public water if the subsidies had not been secured, she said. “If you can’t afford to connect to clean drinking water, you can’t afford to go on vacation,” Rettelle said, adding that during a pandemic people are even less likely to want to travel. “In November, if they had asked me if I wanted a travel voucher or clean water, it would have been 100% clean water,” she said. of affected residents, said she was not offended by Hentschel’s suggestion. She said she even joked that the airport paid for their family’s travel in perpetuity, if identified as the source of contamination. “I joked that if it ended up being the airport’s fault, the air miles could be greatly appreciated.” Contractors at Matt’s Underground Construction in Kalkaska spent the last week connecting homes with PFAS-contaminated water wells to municipal water supplies, first along Avenue B and then down the avenue C. its well was among the highest concentrations in the neighborhood. She hadn’t showered at home because her surgeon had told her that a healing wound from shoulder surgery should not be exposed to pollution. State and local health warned her not to drink or cook with water in October, she said. Rettelle took a shower in her own bathroom Tuesday night for the first time in over four months and described it in one word: “Amazing”. Others are eager to see their connections coming. Lundberg’s well failed last summer and she spent $ 3,000 to repair it after high water levels pushed sand into the pump. It was three months later when she learned of the groundwater contamination, she said. “It was a shock,” Lundberg said. The longtime neighborhood resident, 94, said she was grateful that state, county and township dollars collectively paid for her water. connection to the system, especially after spending so much on his well last July. She chose this out of an offer of $ 25,000 to connect to the water system at the time, Lundberg said. “You know, that’s life. If I had spent the $ 25,000, I was really pissed off, ”she says. .



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As Winter Holidays Approach, Health Services Remind Residents Of Coronavirus Travel Restrictions | Local | Instant News



As schools prepare to lay off for winter vacation, Warren County Health Services reminded residents on Saturday that the state’s travel restrictions remain in place and urged to ban all non-essential travel during the break. coronavirus curve after experiencing more than two months of record cases and hospitalizations, despite warnings in place to avoid travel and large gatherings because of the virus. Health services reported nine new cases on Saturday, as well than 12 healings. , anyone traveling to a state that does not border New York must receive a negative COVID test within 72 hours of returning to the state. Once back home, travelers must self-quarantine for three days before receiving a second negative test on day four.The guidelines do not apply to anyone who has traveled out of state for less than 24 hours. hours or who travel from a neighboring state, which includes Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and New Jersey: There are currently 25 people in travel-related quarantine in the county, according to Health Services, while New York has reported its lowest seven-day average positive test rate since November 30.



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West Coast States Announce Two-Week Travel Advisory To Contain Spread Of COVID-19 | Washington | Instant News


(The Center Square) – Three west coast states are asking out-of-state visitors to self-isolate for at least two weeks to help slow the COVID-19 pandemic The new travel advisories were issued by the governors of California, Oregon, and Washington on Friday and also applies to residents returning home from outside the tri-state. Residents are urged to stay as close to home as possible during the holiday season, as all three states are grappling with an increase in the number of cases. “COVID-19 does not stop at state borders,” said Oregon Governor Kate Brown. “With hospitals in the West depleted, we need to take action to ensure that travelers do not bring this disease home with them. ” According to reviews, non-essential travel includes sightseeing or any other type of recreational activity.Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation has projected that the United States will have 320,403 deaths by Jan. 1 and 438,940 by March 1. “The increase in cases is increasing the strain on our hospital systems and threatening the lives of the elderly, essential workers and vulnerable Californians,” said California Governor Gavin Newsom . “Travel increases the risk of the spread of COVID-19, and we must all collectively step up our efforts right now to keep the virus at bay and save lives.” Warned that tight and poorly ventilated spaces on planes, buses or trains are particularly susceptible to spreading the virus. Travel advisories urge people not to travel out of state, ask eg to self-quarantine for 14 days after arriving from there outside the country. The advisory recommends people restrict social activities to their immediate homes, as Washington state health officials urged the public to do this week. “Limiting and reducing travel is one way to reduce the spread of disease,” said Washington Gov. Jay Inslee. The advisories define essential travel as travel for work and study, support for critical infrastructure, economic services and supply chains, health, immediate medical care, and safety and security. The Johns Hopkins University tally places the current US death toll from COVID-19 at more than 242,000. The three governors have warned that more stay-at-home orders are possibilities and have chosen to tighten restrictions in recent months instead of a full order. .



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